Sunday November 17, 2019
Home Science & Technology Dwarf star fo...

Dwarf star found orbiting closest to black hole

Researchers have found evidence of a white dwarf star orbiting a likely black hole at a distance of only 961,000 km at an astonishing speed

0
//
dwarf
star orbiting black hole, wikimedia

New York, March 14, 2017: Researchers have found evidence of a white dwarf star orbiting a likely black hole at a distance of only 961,000 km — just about 2.5 times the distance between the Earth and the Moon.

In a tightest orbital dance ever witnessed for a black hole and a companion star, the star whips around the black hole at an astonishing speed — about two orbits an hour, said the study published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

“This white dwarf is so close to the black hole that material is being pulled away from the star and dumped onto a disk of matter around the black hole before falling in,” said study lead author Arash Bahramian, affiliated with the University of Alberta in Canada and Michigan State University in the US.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

“Luckily for this star, we don’t think it will follow this path into oblivion, but instead will stay in orbit,” Bahramian said.

Although the white dwarf does not appear to be in danger of falling in or being torn apart by the black hole, its fate is uncertain.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The stellar system, known as X9, is located in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense cluster of stars in our galaxy about 14,800 light years away from the Earth.

“For a long time astronomers thought that black holes were rare or totally absent in globular star clusters,” study co-author Jay Strader from Michigan State University said.

“This discovery is additional evidence that, rather than being one of the worst places to look for black holes, globular clusters might be one of the best,” Strader added.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

For the study, the researchers used data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array as well as NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and NuSTAR telescope. (IANS)

Next Story

Astronomers Discover a Disc Very Close to Starving Black Hole

The presence of the black hole disc in such a low-luminosity active galaxy has astronomers surprised

0
Astronomers, Disc, Black Hole
The unexpected thin disc of material was found encircling a supermassive black hole at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147. Pixabay

Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a disc very close to a starving black hole – something that should not be there – based on current astronomical theories.

The unexpected thin disc of material was found encircling a supermassive black hole at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away, according to a study published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The presence of the black hole disc in such a low-luminosity active galaxy has astronomers surprised.

Black holes in certain types of galaxies such as NGC 3147 are considered to be starving as there is insufficient gravitationally captured material to feed them regularly.

Astronomers, Disc, Black Hole
Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a disc very close to a starving black hole. Pixabay

It is therefore puzzling that there is a thin disc encircling a starving black hole that mimics the much larger discs found in extremely active galaxies, the study said.

The disc’s material was measured by Hubble to be whirling around the black hole at more than 10 per cent of the speed of light.

At such extreme velocities, the gas appears to brighten as it travels toward Earth on one side, and dims as it speeds away from our planet on the other. This effect is known as relativistic beaming.

Hubble’s observations also show that the gas is embedded so deep in a gravitational well that light is struggling to escape, and therefore appears stretched to redder wavelengths. The black hole’s mass is around 250 million times that of the Sun.

Also Read- Education Institutions from Across the World Declares Climate Emergency

“This is an intriguing peek at a disc very close to a black hole, so close that the velocities and the intensity of the gravitational pull are affecting how we see the photons of light,” explained the study’s first author Stefano Bianchi of Roma Tre University in Italy.

Of particular interest, this disc of material circling the black hole offers researchers a unique opportunity to test Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity.

“We’ve never seen the effects of both general and special relativity in visible light with this much clarity,” said Marco Chiaberge of the European Space Agency, and the Space Telescope Science Institute and Johns Hopkins University, both in Baltimore, Maryland. (IANS)