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Ebola Is Now Affecting New Born Babies in Congo: UN

WHO said the risk of the outbreak spreading to neighboring countries remains “very high”

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Ebola, WHO, congo
In this photo taken Sept 9, 2018, a health worker sprays disinfectant on his colleague after working at an Ebola treatment center in Beni, DRC. VOA

The World Health Organization says a worrying number of the newest Ebola cases amid Congo ’s ongoing outbreak are in patients not usually known to catch the disease: babies.

In an update published this week, the U.N. health agency reported 36 new confirmed cases of Ebola, including seven in newborn babies and infants younger than 2 years old. Six cases were reported in children aged between 2 and 17 and one case was in a pregnant woman.

While Ebola typically infects adults, as they are most likely to be exposed to the lethal virus, children have been known in some instances to catch the disease when they act as caregivers.

Ebola, WHO, UNICEF, congo, Uganda
Congolese health workers register people and take their temperatures before they are vaccinated against Ebola in the village of Mangina in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. VOA

Few cases of Ebola in babies have been reported, but experts suspect transmission might happen via breast milk or close contact with infected parents. Ebola is typically spread by infected bodily fluids. WHO noted that health centers have been identified as a source of Ebola transmission, with injections of medications “a notable cause.”

Ebola in Congo

WHO called Congo’s current epidemic “complex and challenging.” Congo’s health ministry says there are 346 confirmed cases, including 175 deaths, in what has become the worst Ebola outbreak in the country’s recorded history.

The outbreak has been plagued by security problems, with health workers attacked by rebels in districts where the virus has been spreading. Earlier this month, Ebola containment operations were paused after seven U.N. peacekeepers and 12 Congolese soldiers were killed, but all activities have resumed.

Ebola, WHO
A health care worker from the World Health Organization, left, gives an Ebola vaccination to a front line aid worker who will then vaccinate people who might potentially have the virus, in Mbandaka, Congo. VOA

The increasing number of cases in children and health workers — 39 health workers have been infected to date — suggests outbreak responders are having major problems stopping the virus in health clinics and convincing people to seek help when they develop symptoms. This is the first time this part of Congo has faced an Ebola outbreak.

Also Read: WHO Ships Vaccination For Yellow Fevre in Ethiopia

WHO said the risk of the outbreak spreading to neighboring countries remains “very high” but it does not recommend travel restrictions. Uganda this month started vaccinating health workers against Ebola in a heavily traveled border district near the outbreak. (VOA)

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Nutrition Tips That Will Help You in Healthy Ageing

Nutrition tips for people over 50

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Healthy ageing
Ageing brings along many changes to the bodily functions and affects most organs. Pixabay

BY SIDDHI JAIN

Ageing is inevitable, irreversible and progressive. Whats more is that it brings along many changes to the bodily functions and affects most organs.

Nutrition has a great role to play in healthy ageing, says Dr Aastha, Head Clinical Nutrition, Max Super Speciality Hospital, Mohali.

“People face several health issues due to age and lack of adequate nutrition can add to the severity of the situation. Therefore, proper nutrient intake is essential for people. As nutrient requirement of people changes with age, one must know what to eat and what not to, based on the condition of their body,” she said.

Few factors that might lead to reduced food intake after one hits 50 are: Loss of appetite, decreased sense of taste and/or smell, difficulty chewing and/or swallowing, loss of physical strength or mobility, chronic conditions and medication, mental and emotional factors, financial insecurity.

Some do’s and don’ts for people of age 50 years and above:

Healthy ageing
For a healthy ageing, eating fruits is important. Pixabay

Adopt easy-to-digest, easy-to-absorb, small frequent meals.

Limit sugars, sweet beverages, undiluted juices, prefer fruits

Add plenty of fluids to your diet as they keep you hydrated and boost digestion

Replace refined cereals and grains with whole grain cereals and pulses

The fibre composition in diet should be moderate

Limit sedentary lifestyle – be physically active

Two-three servings of seasonal fruits should be included every day’s meal

Add onion, ginger, garlic, lemon, cumin seeds, carom seeds, fenugreek seeds, almonds, walnuts, coconut water in diet as these are good for muscular flexibility, prevent water retention and swelling and also contribute to maintain healthy blood pressure.

Busting a few myths about ageing and nutrition:

Healthy ageing
Nutrition has a great role to play in healthy ageing. Pixabay

There is no reason for avoiding proteins in this age, as proteins are essential for tissue repair, avoiding pulses at night is an additional myth.

Salt needs to restricted only when one is hypertensive or has serum sodium levels on the higher side.

Cottage cheese does not have cholesterol if it is made from toned milk and is a very healthy option.

Saturated fats need not be eliminated totally from diet, unless one has a heart block or hypercholesterolemia.

Consumption of milk post dinner is just fine provided it’s not taken too late.

Also Read- Why People Are Turning To CBD Vs Traditional Medicine

Reducing number of meals beyond 3 is way more harmful, so one must target 3 major meals and 2 minor meals to keep metabolism going.

Eating healthily, combined with regular physical activity, can help a person live a full active life. (IANS)