Thursday April 25, 2019
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Efforts on to trace two pilots of crashed Pawan Hans chopper

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Mumbai: A massive search operation is on to locate two missing pilots of a Pawan Hans Ltd helicopter which crashed into the Arabian Sea around 80 nautical miles off south Mumbai, officials said on Thursday.

Members of the search operation have recovered a portion of the door of the ill-fated chopper which crashed on Wednesday evening around two nautical miles away from the SLQ Oil rig.

The 14-seater Pawan Hans Dauphin AS 365-N3 had two pilots on board on a night landing training mission. The cause of the crash is yet to be determined.

The names of the pilots are: commander E Samuel and co-pilot T K Guha, both living at the PHL residential complex in Mumbai.

According to the current situation, two Indian Coast Guard ships were diverted to the area, and also a helicopter carrying ship was dispatched from Porbandar port. Two Dornier choppers from Daman and Porbander were launched earlier on Thursday.

After the crash, Indian Navy’s Immediate Supply Vessels T48a nd T50, a naval destroyer INS Mumbai, a night capable helicopter Seaking C and other vessels were rushed to the area to trace the missing chopper, but rescue operations were hampered due to the morning haze.

A government undertaking, the PHL currently has nearly four dozen big and small helicopters in its fleet and is engaged in providing support services to the oil sector’s off-shore operations, services to remote hilly areas and tourist charters.

(IANS)

 

 

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Singapore To Come Up With Strict Alcohol Norms For Pilots

The Singapore Air Operator Certificate holders will be required to strengthen their alcohol abstention policies and implement an Airline Alcohol Management Programme from May to identify, manage and rehabilitate pilots with problematic use of alcohol, the release said. 

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Pilots found to be operating under the influence of alcohol may be subjected to criminal penalties of up to 50,000 Singapore dollars (about $36,878.5) and/or imprisonment of up to two years for the first offence, and up to 100,000 Singapore dollars and/or imprisonment of up to five years for repeat offenders. Pixabay

The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) announced here on Thursday that it would tighten the regulatory regime on alcohol abstention to mitigate the risk of pilots operating under the influence of liquor.

According to CAAS, the authority will implement the Airport Alcohol Testing Programme (AATP) and start random testing of pilots at Changi and Seletar airports on March 31, the Xinhua news agency reported.

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Pilots found to be operating under the influence of alcohol may be subjected to criminal penalties of up to 50,000 Singapore dollars (about $36,878.5) and/or imprisonment of up to two years for the first offence, and up to 100,000 Singapore dollars and/or imprisonment of up to five years for repeat offenders. Pixabay

It will set the alcohol abstinence standard at 0.02 grams per 210 liters of breath for pilots. Those found to exceed the standard would not be permitted to fly, it said.

Pilots found to be operating under the influence of alcohol may be subjected to criminal penalties of up to 50,000 Singapore dollars (about $36,878.5) and/or imprisonment of up to two years for the first offence, and up to 100,000 Singapore dollars and/or imprisonment of up to five years for repeat offenders.

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It will set the alcohol abstinence standard at 0.02 grams per 210 liters of breath for pilots. Those found to exceed the standard would not be permitted to fly, it said.
Pixabay

The Singapore Air Operator Certificate holders will be required to strengthen their alcohol abstention policies and implement an Airline Alcohol Management Programme from May to identify, manage and rehabilitate pilots with problematic use of alcohol, the release said.

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Kevin Shum, Director General of CAAS, said: “The safety of aircraft operations, passengers and crew on board is paramount and the CAAS and the aviation community take a serious view of pilots operating under the influence of alcohol.”

“The new alcohol testing and management programmes will help ensure that pilots’ ability to operate aircraft is not impaired by alcohol,” he said. (IANS)