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Engagement With U.S. For Peace Talk On Track: Taliban

"Peace talks [are] out there, regional players are pressing for peace, the Taliban is talking about peace, the Afghan government is talking about peace,"

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Members of Taliban delegation take their seats during the multilateral peace talks on Afghanistan in Moscow, Nov. 9, 2018. VOA

The Taliban has said that its engagement with the United States for negotiating an end to “the war and illegitimate occupation” of Afghanistan remains on track, ruling out once again any direct peace talks with the government in Kabul

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid told VOA a new round of discussions with the U.S. is in the cards but dates and a venue have not yet been determined.

He was responding to and rejected as “false claims” reports that insurgent negotiators were planning to hold direct talks with Afghan officials in Saudi Arabia later this month.

U.S. special representative for Afghanistan reconciliation, Zalmay Khalilzad, held two days of marathon talks in mid December with a high-powered Taliban delegation in Abu Dhabi, where envoys of Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and the host country also were in attendance.

Afghan President, elections, U.S.
Afghan President Ashraf Ghani speaks during a U.N. conference on Afghanistan, Nov. 28, 2018, at U.N. offices in Geneva, Switzerland. VOA

The Pakistani government took credit for arranging the meeting in the United Arab Emirates following Khalilzad’s preliminary interactions with Taliban representatives based in Qatar.

“There has been no interruption in the dialogue process with America because ending the occupation of Afghanistan is now a compulsion for them [U.S.],” said Mujahid.

He asserted that if talks fail to achieve the desired results and the war continues with the Taliban “the Americans would have no option but to be driven out of Afghanistan.”

In a separate statement issued via Taliban social media, Mujahid appeared upbeat, however, about the outcome of the series of negotiations held with the Americans.

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Sher Mohammad Abbas Stanakzai, right, head of the Taliban’s political council in Qatar, takes part in the multilateral peace talks on Afghanistan in Moscow, Nov. 9, 2018. VOA

“We can say with certainty that they indeed proved effective. They have given birth to hope that should the negotiations continue with such speed, then it is possible that foreign aggression be brought to an end, following which peace will be established,” the Taliban spokesman said.

He defended Taliban’s stance for not holding talks with the Afghan government, dismissing them as the product of “foreign occupation” of Afghanistan, with no “authority or ability” to end to the conflict.

President Donald Trump reportedly is weighing options about whether to significantly reduce the more than 14,000 forces currently stationed in Afghanistan.

The reports have worried officials in Kabul and foreign critics who maintain the drawdown would leave no incentive for the Taliban to halt fighting and seek a negotiated settlement to the war.

Mujahid mocked Afghan officials for urging Trump to review his drawdown plans, saying “the Afghan people saw the quislings at Kabul letting out screams.”

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U.S. special envoy for peace in Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, talks with local reporters at the U.S. embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Nov. 18, 2018. VOA

The Taliban maintains the U.S. is its main adversary in the Afghan war and views direct talks with Washington as a legitimate effort to seek withdrawal of foreign troops before engaging in an intra-Afghan peace dialogue.

The 17-year war in Afghanistan is the longest overseas American military intervention in history. It has cost nearly a trillion dollars and killed roughly 150,000 people. Civilians, security forces, including more than 2,400 U.S. troops, and insurgents are among those killed.

U.S. military officials appear to be positioning themselves to tackle various possible outcomes of the talks with the Taliban.

General Austin Scott Miller,who commands U.S. and NATO-led non-combat Resolution Support (RS) mission in Afghanistan,told his troops last Tuesday to be ready to deal with “positive processes or negative consequences.” He nevertheless underscored the need for a political settlement to end the Afghan war.

Also Read: Peace Offer By Afghan Government Gets Rejected By Taliban

“Peace talks [are] out there, regional players are pressing for peace, the Taliban is talking about peace, the Afghan government is talking about peace,” Miller told dozens of NATO soldiers during a routine exercise session at RS headquarters in Kabul.

“Are [the RS] able to adapt? Are we able to adjust? Are we able to be in the right place to support positive processes and negative consequences, that’s what I ask you guys to think about in 2019,” Miller said. (VOA)

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U.S. Pentagon Emits More Greenhouse Gases Than Portugal, Study Finds

The Pentagon, which oversees the U.S. military, released about 59 million metric tons of carbon dioxide

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FILE - The Pentagon building is seen in Washington. VOA

The United States creates more planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions through its defense operations alone than industrialized countries such as Sweden and Portugal, researchers said Wednesday.

The Pentagon, which oversees the U.S. military, released about 59 million metric tons of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in 2017, according to the first study to compile such comprehensive data, published by Brown University.

The Pentagon’s emissions were “in any one year … greater than many smaller countries’ greenhouse gas emissions,” the study said.

If it were a country, its emissions would make it the world’s 55th-largest contributor, said Neta Crawford, the study’s author and a political scientist at Boston University.

U.S., Pentagon, Greenhouse Gases
FILE – Air pollution hangs over the skyline as the sun rises over Beijing’s central business district, Jan. 14, 2013. VOA

“There is a lot of room here to reduce emissions,” Crawford said.

Request for comments to the Pentagon went unanswered.

Troop movements

Using and moving troops and weapons accounted for about 70% of its energy consumption, mostly due to the burning of jet and diesel fuel, Crawford said.

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It dwarfed yearly emissions by Sweden, which the international research project Global Carbon Atlas ranks 65th worldwide for its of CO2 emissions.

Pentagon emissions were higher than those of Portugal, ranked 57th by the Global Carbon Atlas, said Crawford.

China is the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide, the main gas responsible for climate change, followed by the United States.

The Pentagon called climate change “a national security issue” in a January report to Congress and has launched multiple initiatives to prepare for its impact.

U.S., Pentagon, Greenhouse Gases
The United States creates more planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions. Pixabay

Global temperatures are on course for an increase of 3 to 5 degrees Celsius (5.4-9.0 degrees Fahrenheit) this century, far overshooting a global target of limiting the increase to 2 C or less, the U.N. World Meteorological Organization said in November.

Four degrees Celsius of warming would increase more than five times the influence of climate on conflict, according to a study published in Nature magazine on Wednesday.

Improvements

Crawford said the Pentagon had reduced its fuel consumption significantly since 2009, including by making its vehicles more efficient and moving to cleaner sources of energy at bases.

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It could reduce them further by cutting fuel-heavy missions to the Persian Gulf to protect access to oil, which were no longer a top priority as renewable energy gained ground, she said.

“Many missions could actually be rethought, and it would make the world safer,” she said. (VOA)