Tuesday September 18, 2018

Every Day In Madhya Pradesh 61 Children Die, Official Data Shows

This information was given by Minister for Woman and Child Development Archana Chitnis

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UN: A Child Dies Every Five Seconds, Most Are Preventable Deaths. Pixabay
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Contrary to the claims of the Madhya Pradesh government of protecting children from malnutrition and various diseases, official data shows that every day no less than 61 kids in the 0-9 age group die for the same reasons.

This information was given by Minister for Woman and Child Development Archana Chitnis in the state Assembly in response to a question by Congress MLA Ramnivas Rawat.

The Congress legislator had sought to know how many children were found under-weight and how many of them died between February and May 2018.

Chitness replied that a total of 1,183,985 children were found to be under-weight, out of which 103,083 were critically low on weight.

She further informed that during the period, 6,024 infants aged up to one year and 1,308 children between one and five years died due to various diseases.

Minister for Woman and Child Development Archana Chitnis
Minister for Woman and Child Development Archana Chitnis. Flickr

Rawat said it is a sad commentary on the state of childcare in the state.

“The state government has been making tall claims on children’s healthcare. But 7,332 children dying over a period of 120 days means 61 kids are dying every day!” he said.

The Minister said that at a review meeting on September 15, 2016, it was decided to issue a white paper on childcare in the state and a committee for the purpose had also been constituted.

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baby. pixabay

Also read:A Vaccine Against Pneumonia And Meningitis Saves Million Children

But the points of reference of the committee are yet to finalised and no meeting of the panel has been held as yet. (IANS)

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A Majority of Children Die Due to Lack of Basic Healthcare Facilities: UN

For children everywhere, the most precarious time is the first month of life

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A malnourished child lies in a bed waiting to receive treatment at a therapeutic feeding center in a hospital in Sana'a, Yemen, Jan. 24, 2016. (VOA)

An estimated 6.3 million children died before their 15th birthdays in 2017, or one every five seconds, mostly due to a lack of water, sanitation, nutrition and basic healthcare, according to report by United Nations agencies on Tuesday.

The vast majority of these deaths – 5.4 million – occur in the first five years of life, with newborns accounting for around half of the deaths, the report said.

“With simple solutions like medicines, clean water, electricity and vaccines” this toll could be dramatically reduced, said Laurence Chandy, an expert with the U.N. children’s fund UNICEF. But without urgent action, 56 million children under five – half of them newborns – will die between now and 2030.

Globally, in 2017, half of all deaths in children under five were in sub-Saharan Africa, where one in 13 children died before their fifth birthday. In high-income countries, that number was one in 185, according to the report co-led by UNICEF, the World Health Organization and the World Bank.

Children
UN: A Child Dies Every Five Seconds, Most Are Preventable Deaths. Pixabay

It found that most children under five die due to preventable or treatable causes such as complications during birth, pneumonia, diarrhoea, neonatal sepsis and malaria. Among older children – aged five to 14 – injuries become a more prominent cause of death, especially from drowning and road traffic.

For children everywhere, the most precarious time is the first month of life. In 2017, 2.5 million newborns died in their first month, and a baby born in sub-Saharan Africa or in Southern Asia was nine times more likely to die in the first month than one born in a high-income country.

Also Read- NASA Celebrates Its 60th Anniversary

Despite these problems, the U.N. report found that fewer children are dying each year worldwide. The number of under five deaths fell to 5.4 million in 2017 from 12.6 million in 1990, while the number of deaths in five to 14 year-olds dropped to under a million from 1.7 million in the same period. (VOA)