Monday January 22, 2018

Exercise may become anti-cancer therapy in future

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For the first time international clinical trial has been evaluating the effect of intense physical exercise on the body to improve survival of men with advanced prostate cancer is underway.

Physical exercise has a direct effect on cancer — as effective as drugs — for treating patients with prostate cancer even in advanced stages of the disease said Dr Fred Saad, urologist-oncologist and researcher at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM)

“Typical patients with metastases often become sedentary. It is thought that this affects cancer progression,” he said.

Together with Robert Newton, professor at the Edith Cowan University Exercise Medicine Research Institute in Australia, Dr Saad is leading the first international study which aims to demonstrate that exercise literally extends the life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

Normally, patients at this stage have a life expectancy of two to three years.

“We want to reduce mortality by at least 22 percent, which represents about six months of longer survival. This is the equivalent benefit of a new drug. Exercise could therefore supplement available treatments, inexpensively,” said Dr Saad.

The study has already started in Ireland and Australia. In the coming weeks, some 60 hospitals across the world will begin recruiting patients. In total, nearly 900 men with advanced prostate cancer will participate.

“We will study exercise as if it were a drug added to standard treatments. All patients will be treated within the latest scientific knowledge for this type of cancer,” he explained.

The team has designed a specific strength and cardiovascular training programme for patients in the “exercise” group.They will have an hour of aerobic and resistance training three times a week.

An exercise specialist will supervise them for the first 12 months, and then they will continue without direct supervision. They will be evaluated for quality of life, appetite, and treatment tolerance in relation to their improved physical condition.

The Theory is that cancer progression is directly affected by exercise in addition it also helps patient tolerate therapy better

Overview of the Phase 3 clinical trial will be presented by Dr Saad at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago from June 3-7.

-by Bhaskar Raghavendran

Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication from Amity school of communication, Noida. Contact the author at Twitter: bhaskar_ragha

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  • Pritam Go Green

    Many scientists have proved that the power of yoga and exercise is much more than that of medicines. So yes people should definitely be taught the benefits of doing a regular exercise, Since it can cure dangerous diseases such as Cancer etc.

  • Akanksha Sharma

    Exercise can improve your health and reduce the risk of developing several diseases like diabetes, cancer and several heart diseases.

  • Pritam Go Green

    Many scientists have proved that the power of yoga and exercise is much more than that of medicines. So yes people should definitely be taught the benefits of doing a regular exercise, Since it can cure dangerous diseases such as Cancer etc.

  • Akanksha Sharma

    Exercise can improve your health and reduce the risk of developing several diseases like diabetes, cancer and several heart diseases.

Next Story

Colorectal Cancer Rising Among Younger Adults

Researchers note that rates of colorectal cancer have been falling since the 1980s.

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Colorectal Cancer rising among the young adults. Pixabay
Colorectal Cancer rising among the young adults. Pixabay
  • Latest research says young adults have higher chances of having colorectal cancer
  • Risk is higher in those born in 1990
  • The research also has stats for other kinds of cancer

Americans born in 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer than those born around 1950, a new study suggests.

The study found that colorectal cancer is on the rise among young and middle-aged adults in their early 50s. Rectal cancer is growing particularly fast among people younger than 55, with 30 percent of diagnoses in people under 55.

“Trends in young people are a bellwether for the future disease burden,” said Rebecca Siegel, of the American Cancer Society and lead author of the study that appeared in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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The risk is more for people born in 1990 than those in 1950. Wikimedia commons
The risk is more for people born in 1990 than those in 1950. Wikimedia commons

“Our finding that colorectal cancer risk for millennials has escalated back to the level of those born in the late 1800s is very sobering. Educational campaigns are needed to alert clinicians and the general public about this increase to help reduce delays in diagnosis, which are so prevalent in young people, but also to encourage healthier eating and more active lifestyles to try to reverse this trend.”

Researchers note that rates of colorectal cancer have been falling since the 1980s with an even steeper decline in the past decade, which has been caused by more screening.

But they wanted to find out why some studies have shown a rising rate among people under 50 for whom screening is generally not done. For their study, researchers looked at cases of colorectal cancer in people over 20 from 1974 to 2013. There were 490,305 cases.

Cancer rate declined generally but increased in this particular age group. VOA
Cancer rate declined generally but increased in this particular age group. VOA

The data showed the rates of colon cancer initially decreased after 1974, but then grew by one or two percent from the mid-1980s to 2013 among adults aged 20 to 39. For people aged 40 to 54, the rates increased between .5 percent and one percent from the mid 1990s to 2013.

For rectal cancer, the increases were greater, with rates rising about three percent per year from 1974 to 2013 in adults aged 20 to 29. For adults between 30 and 39, there was a similar rise from 1980 to 2013. For adults between 40 and 54, rates increased by two percent from the 1990s to 2013.

Rates for adults older than 55 has been declining for about 40 years, researchers said.

Also Read : Immunotherapy : Allison’s Trials

Researchers say the results could change the age at which screening for colorectal cancer starts and cite 10,400 cases diagnosed in people in their 40s plus 12,800 cases in people in their early 50s.

“These numbers are similar to the total number of cervical cancers diagnosed, for which we recommend screening for the 95 million women ages 21 to 65 years,” Siegel said. VOA