Monday February 18, 2019

Exercise may become anti-cancer therapy in future

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For the first time international clinical trial has been evaluating the effect of intense physical exercise on the body to improve survival of men with advanced prostate cancer is underway.

Physical exercise has a direct effect on cancer — as effective as drugs — for treating patients with prostate cancer even in advanced stages of the disease said Dr Fred Saad, urologist-oncologist and researcher at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM)

“Typical patients with metastases often become sedentary. It is thought that this affects cancer progression,” he said.

Together with Robert Newton, professor at the Edith Cowan University Exercise Medicine Research Institute in Australia, Dr Saad is leading the first international study which aims to demonstrate that exercise literally extends the life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

Normally, patients at this stage have a life expectancy of two to three years.

“We want to reduce mortality by at least 22 percent, which represents about six months of longer survival. This is the equivalent benefit of a new drug. Exercise could therefore supplement available treatments, inexpensively,” said Dr Saad.

The study has already started in Ireland and Australia. In the coming weeks, some 60 hospitals across the world will begin recruiting patients. In total, nearly 900 men with advanced prostate cancer will participate.

“We will study exercise as if it were a drug added to standard treatments. All patients will be treated within the latest scientific knowledge for this type of cancer,” he explained.

The team has designed a specific strength and cardiovascular training programme for patients in the “exercise” group.They will have an hour of aerobic and resistance training three times a week.

An exercise specialist will supervise them for the first 12 months, and then they will continue without direct supervision. They will be evaluated for quality of life, appetite, and treatment tolerance in relation to their improved physical condition.

The Theory is that cancer progression is directly affected by exercise in addition it also helps patient tolerate therapy better

Overview of the Phase 3 clinical trial will be presented by Dr Saad at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago from June 3-7.

-by Bhaskar Raghavendran

Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication from Amity school of communication, Noida. Contact the author at Twitter: bhaskar_ragha

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  • Pritam Go Green

    Many scientists have proved that the power of yoga and exercise is much more than that of medicines. So yes people should definitely be taught the benefits of doing a regular exercise, Since it can cure dangerous diseases such as Cancer etc.

  • Akanksha Sharma

    Exercise can improve your health and reduce the risk of developing several diseases like diabetes, cancer and several heart diseases.

SHARE
  • Pritam Go Green

    Many scientists have proved that the power of yoga and exercise is much more than that of medicines. So yes people should definitely be taught the benefits of doing a regular exercise, Since it can cure dangerous diseases such as Cancer etc.

  • Akanksha Sharma

    Exercise can improve your health and reduce the risk of developing several diseases like diabetes, cancer and several heart diseases.

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Know How Higher Intake of Sodium Can Treat Lightheadedness

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

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"Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms," Juraschek said. Pixabay

Higher sodium intake should not be used as a treatment for lightheadedness, say researchers challenging current guidelines for sodium consumption.

Lightheadedness while standing, known as postural lightheadedness, results from gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults.

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

However, contrary to this recommendation, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) found that higher sodium intake, actually increases dizziness.

“Our study has clinical and research implications,” said Stephen Juraschek, researcher from BIDMC in Boston.

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Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions. Pixabay

“Our results serve to caution health practitioners against recommending increased sodium intake as a universal treatment for lightheadedness. Additionally, our results demonstrate the need for additional research to understand the role of sodium, and more broadly of diet, on lightheadedness,” Juraschek said.

For the study, reported in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, the team used data from the completed DASH-Sodium trial, a randomised crossover study that looked at the effects of three different sodium levels (1500, 2300, and 3300 mg/d) on participants’ blood pressure for four weeks.

While the trial showed that lower sodium led to decrease in blood pressure, it also suggested that concerns about lower level of sodium causing dizziness may not be scientifically correct.

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The study also questioned recommendations to use sodium to treat lightheadedness, an intervention that could have negative effects on cardiovascular health.

“Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms,” Juraschek said.

“Clinicians should check on symptoms after initiation and even question the utility of this approach. More importantly, research is needed to understand the effects of sodium on physical function, particularly in older adults.” (IANS)