Tuesday April 23, 2019

Exercise may help Patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer to cope better with side effects of Chemotherapy

The findings showed that as a result of the exercise, muscle mass improved as did functional properties, such as balance, walking speed and leg strength

0
//
Exercise, Pixabay

London, March 12, 2017: Walking or jogging either three times a week for 50 minutes or five times a week for 30 minutes may help patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer to cope better with the side effects of chemotherapy, a study has showed.

Side effects of the chemotherapy may include loss of sensation, weakness, exhaustion, infections or severe diarrhoea, which often causes patients to reduce or even discontinue the programme.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The findings showed that as a result of the exercise, muscle mass improved as did functional properties, such as balance, walking speed and leg strength.

Further, the toxicity of the chemotherapy could be reduced through moderate activity.

“This is important because it is especially due to severe toxic effects that patients with gastrointestinal cancer often have to reduce the dose or even discontinue the chemotherapy altogether,” Katrin Stucher, doctoral student at the Goethe University Frankfurt in Germany, said in a statement.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Patients, who were engaged in exercise along with chemotherapy could tolerate the therapy better and experience less disease recurrence (relapses) later on.

“We believe that it will make sense in future to offer patients opportunities for physical exercise during chemotherapy. To eliminate adversities through the weather, exercise rooms could be set up in hospitals,” Stucher added. (IANS)

Next Story

Research Claims, Regular Exercise Can Boost Life Of Breast Cancer Survivors

"The main cause of mortality in women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer is heart disease," said Kyuwan Lee, doctoral student at the University of Southern California (USC), noting that prescribed exercise is not considered standard care currently.

0
yoga
The study found that patients who participated in a 16-week exercise programme had a significantly reduced risk of developing cardiovascular disease over their sedentary counterparts. Pixabay

Exercise can likely reduce the risk of heart disease in women with breast cancer, results of a clinical trial has showed.

Breast cancer patients are exposed to a higher risk of cardiovascular complications during and after cancer treatment from chemotherapy and radiation therapy. These can be exacerbated by obesity and sedentary lifestyles.

The study found that patients who participated in a 16-week exercise programme had a significantly reduced risk of developing cardiovascular disease over their sedentary counterparts.

heart
In his next phase, he plans to study prevention of cardiovascular dysfunction in cancer patients undergoing cardio-toxic chemotherapy, which uses drugs whose side effects can cause irreversible damage to the heart muscles. Pixabay

“The main cause of mortality in women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer is heart disease,” said Kyuwan Lee, doctoral student at the University of Southern California (USC), noting that prescribed exercise is not considered standard care currently.

“We hope that this study shows the importance of exercise in reducing the risk of heart disease to emphasise the need to integrate exercise into clinical practice for cancer patients,” he added.

cancer
Breast cancer patients are exposed to a higher risk of cardiovascular complications during and after cancer treatment from chemotherapy and radiation therapy. These can be exacerbated by obesity and sedentary lifestyles. VOA

For the study, published in the journal Oncology, the team conducted a randomised clinical trial that included 100 sedentary, obese women breast cancer stage I-III survivors.

Also Read: “Countries Had “Set Up” Migrant Caravans That Make Their Way To The U.S.,” President Donald Trump Calls for Ending Aid

The women participated in three weekly supervised one-on-one exercise sessions for 16 weeks: 80-minute sessions of resistance and aerobic exercise for two days and 50 minutes of aerobic exercise on the third day. This intervention meets the exercise guidelines set forth by the American Cancer Society for cancer survivors.

The findings are only the beginning for Lee. In his next phase, he plans to study prevention of cardiovascular dysfunction in cancer patients undergoing cardio-toxic chemotherapy, which uses drugs whose side effects can cause irreversible damage to the heart muscles. (IANS)