Saturday April 21, 2018

Exercise may help Patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer to cope better with side effects of Chemotherapy

The findings showed that as a result of the exercise, muscle mass improved as did functional properties, such as balance, walking speed and leg strength

0
//
54
Exercise, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

London, March 12, 2017: Walking or jogging either three times a week for 50 minutes or five times a week for 30 minutes may help patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer to cope better with the side effects of chemotherapy, a study has showed.

Side effects of the chemotherapy may include loss of sensation, weakness, exhaustion, infections or severe diarrhoea, which often causes patients to reduce or even discontinue the programme.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The findings showed that as a result of the exercise, muscle mass improved as did functional properties, such as balance, walking speed and leg strength.

Further, the toxicity of the chemotherapy could be reduced through moderate activity.

“This is important because it is especially due to severe toxic effects that patients with gastrointestinal cancer often have to reduce the dose or even discontinue the chemotherapy altogether,” Katrin Stucher, doctoral student at the Goethe University Frankfurt in Germany, said in a statement.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Patients, who were engaged in exercise along with chemotherapy could tolerate the therapy better and experience less disease recurrence (relapses) later on.

“We believe that it will make sense in future to offer patients opportunities for physical exercise during chemotherapy. To eliminate adversities through the weather, exercise rooms could be set up in hospitals,” Stucher added. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

New Biomarker Helps Identify Cancer Chemotherapy Timing

Angiogenesis therapy is clinically used to suppress tumour growth. Adding an anti-angiogenic drug can boost an anticancer drug's effectiveness

0
//
23
Biomarker can be used to decide timing fro chemotherapy.

In ray of hope for doctors to identify the tumour normalising period for effective timing of anti-cancer drug treatment, a team of researchers have discovered a new biomarker that can visualise the activity of blood vessels.

Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is essential for tumour growth. The team from Osaka University in Japan, in a paper reported in The American Journal of Pathology, described a vascular stabilization biomarker that can visualize blood vessel activity, thus optimising the timing of anticancer therapies including anti-angiogenics.

Chronic diseases are not yet included in cancer prevention schemes.
This can help cancer patients greatly.

Combination therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors and anticancer drugs can improve drug delivery into tumour tissues and prolong progression-free survival. “Vascular normalisation by angiogenesis inhibitors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling inhibitors, is a promising method for improvement of chemotherapy.

“However, it is unclear how we can recognise the ‘window of opportunity’ for the tumour vascular normalising period for effective timing of anti-cancer drug treatment. Therefore, biomarkers delineating this window are essential,” explained Nobuyuki Takakura, Professor at Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University.

Also Read: What We Know About Cancer Risk and Coffee

Angiogenesis therapy is clinically used to suppress tumour growth. Adding an anti-angiogenic drug can boost an anticancer drug’s effectiveness. Basic research indicates that anti-angiogenic therapy allows the blood vessels to return to quiescence and “normalise” so that the anti-cancer drug can penetrate the tumour more effectively. IANS

Next Story