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Facebook can even help you lose weight: Study

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New York, Connect emotionally with your friends on Facebook if you want to avoid binge eating and a bloated body that happens later, says a study. facebook-260818_640

According to the researchers from University of North Carolina, if young women are not using Facebook to compare their bodies to their friends’ bodies, they are less likely to struggle with risky dieting behaviors compared to their peers.

“Young college women who are more emotionally involved in Facebook and have lots of Facebook friends are less concerned with body size and shape and less likely to engage in risky dieting behaviors,” said Stephanie Zerwas, assistant professor of psychiatry.

In the study, 128 college-aged women completed an online survey with questions designed to measure their disordered eating.

The team also asked questions about each woman’s emotional connection to Facebook — her incorporation of the social networking site — into their daily life, time spent on the site each day and number of Facebook friends.

They also checked whether they compared their bodies to their friends’ in online pictures. The team noticed that being more emotionally invested in Facebook was associated with less concern about body size, shape and lesser risky dieting behaviors.

“Facebook could be an amazing tool to nurture social support and connections with friends and families,” Zerwas said.

The social networking site could also be used a tool to foster dangerous dieting behaviors in young adults, the authors said in a paper published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

 

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AI Couldn’t Catch NZ Attack Video Streaming: Facebook

Facebook said it was exploring how AI could help it react faster to this kind of content on a live streamed video

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Facing flak for failure to block the live broadcast of the New Zealand terrorist attack last week, Facebook on Thursday said that its Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools were not “perfect” to detect the horrific video.

Vowing to improve its technology, the social networking giant, however, ruled out adding a time delay to Facebook Live, similar to the broadcast delay sometimes used by TV stations.

“There are millions of Live broadcasts daily, which means a delay would not help address the problem due to the sheer number of videos,” Guy Rosen, Facebook’s Vice President of Integrity, said in a statement.

“More importantly, given the importance of user reports, adding a delay would only further slow down videos getting reported, reviewed and first responders being alerted to provide help on the ground,” Rosen added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcast graphic footage of the New Zealand shooting via Facebook Live for 17 minutes, which was later shared in millions on other social media platforms, including Twitter and YouTube.

Fifty people were killed and dozens injured in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

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This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

The circulation of the video on social media platforms attracted widespread criticism from different quarters.

In a letter to CEOs of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Microsoft, House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson asked the technology companies to brief the US Congress on March 27 regarding their response to dissemination of the video on their platforms.

Thompson also warned the technology companies that unless they do better in removing violent content, the Congress could consider policies to bar such content on social media.

Also Read- Finland Probing Nokia Phones Sending Data to China

Facebook on Thursday said it was exploring how AI could help it react faster to this kind of content on a live streamed video.

“AI has made massive progress over the years and in many areas, which has enabled us to proactively detect the vast majority of the content we remove. But it’s not perfect.

“However, this particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Rosen said, referring to the New Zealand attack video. (IANS)