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Facebook reunites mother and son after 15 years

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

In a scene straight from a Bollywood movie, a Facebook photo helped a Californian woman reunite with her son after 15 years.

Three-year-old Jonathan was allegedly kidnapped by his father and taken to Mexico 15 years back.

Last year, Jonathan, now 18, posted a childhood photo with his brother on Facebook, thinking that his mother Hope Holland or his grown-up brother may find him on the social networking site, Time reported.

Last week, the reunion finally happened and a teary Holland could not stop thanking Facebook for this miracle.

“I am happy. It has been a long journey here,” Holland, who had lost all hopes of seeing Jonathan again, was quoted as saying.

The miracle happened when Holland was signing up for a webinar on Facebook in January this year. There, she saw a picture of two little boys taking a bath together.

“At first, my body responded with panic and excitement. Heart palpitations and sweat…my breathing out of control,” she told ABC 10 television.

“I was the one who had taken the picture,” she said.

She visited Jonathan’s Facebook page and messaged someone who was scrolling through same photos she was looking at.

The person put her in touch with Jonathan. Three days later, they spoke on the phone for the first time and decided to meet, the Time report said.

Jonathan plans to return to California after completing high school.

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4,000 Viewed NZ Mosques Shootings Live, Claims Facebook

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram

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Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. Facebook said it is aware of outages on its platforms including Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. VOA

Facing the flak over its inability to spot and remove the livestreaming of New Zealand mosque’s shooting, Facebook on Tuesday said 4,000 people viewed it before being taken down.

“The video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast. No users reported the video during the live broadcast,” Chris Sonderby, VP and Deputy General Counsel, said in a blog-post. “Including the views during the live broadcast, the video was viewed about 4,000 times in total before being removed from Facebook,” Sonderby added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcasted graphic footage of shooting via Facebook Live for nearly 17 minutes. It was later shared in millions on other social media platforms.

Fifty people were killed in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian national Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

According to Facebook, the first user report on the original video came in 29 minutes after the video started, and 12 minutes after the live broadcast ended. “Before we were alerted to the video, a user on ‘8chan’ posted a link to a copy of the video on a file-sharing site,” said Sonderby.

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

“We removed the personal accounts of the named suspect from Facebook and Instagram, and are identifying and removing any imposter accounts that surface,” he said.

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram.

Also Read- Netflix Not to Integrate its Services with Apple Streaming Platform

“Some variants such as screen recordings were more difficult to detect, so we expanded to additional detection systems, including the use of audio technology,” Sonderby said.

“In the first 24 hours, we removed about 1.5 million videos of the attack. More than 1.2 million of those videos were blocked at upload, and were therefore prevented from being seen on our services,” he said. (IANS)