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Facebook ‘Tricks’ Kids, Parents into Spending Money in Free Games

And parents also did not know their children could use their credit card without re-entering a password or some other form of verification, according to the Reveal

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Facebook, data,photos
A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Facebook engaged in practices that “tricked” children and their parents into spending money in free-to-play games, the media has reported.

According to records that are part of a class-action lawsuit, and include internal Facebook memos, secret strategies and employee emails, the social media giant engaged in what was internally dubbed “friendly fraud” in order to maximise its revenues.

“And the company often denied attempts by parents to recover hundreds or even thousands of dollars until credit card companies ‘clawed back’ the money from Facebook,” the VentureBeat reported late on Saturday.

The story detailed the case of one 12-year-old boy who had spent nearly $1,000 in the game Ninja Saga. That case led to a lawsuit in 2012, the report added.

Facebook, Fake News
Facebook ‘tricked’ kids, parents to spend money on ‘free’ games: Report. VOA

The time span for the abuses covered 2010 to 2014, but the documents related to these cases were not released until now.

An internal Facebook survey of users found that many parents did not even realise that the social networking giant was storing their credit card information.

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And parents also did not know their children could use their credit card without re-entering a password or some other form of verification, according to the Reveal. (IANS)

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Zoom Raiders Use Social Media Platforms Like Instagram, Twitter To Organise Campaigns

Teenagers running those accounts told the news outlet that they found Zoomraiding a way to escape completing school work

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Twitter
Twitter is also reportedly looking at how it can deal with the issue. Pixabay

As more classes go online with video meeting app Zoom due to the COVID-19 restrictions, bad actors are making use of social media platforms such as Instagram and Twitter to organise harassment campaigns, or what has come to be known as “Zoomraiding” or “Zoombombing”, the media reported.

There are several accounts on Instagram and Twitter asking people to share Zoom meeting codes so that they can raid those video conferences or classes organised through the app, CNET reported on Friday. While Instagram is in the process of pulling down accounts that claim to offer Zoomraiding, the menace is far from over.

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“Zoomraiding” or “Zoombombing” has emerged as a new type of online harassment in which hate speech, pornography or other inappropriate content is suddenly flashed by disrupting a video call on Zoom. Twitter is also reportedly looking at how it can deal with the issue.

Zoom
As more classes go online with video meeting app Zoom due to the COVID-19 restrictions, bad actors are making use of social media platforms such as Instagram and Twitter to organise harassment campaigns, or what has come to be known as “Zoomraiding” or “Zoombombing”. IANS

After The New York Times discovered 153 Instagram accounts created for Zoombombing, the Facebook-owned photo and video-sharing app on Friday said it was still in the process of pulling down accounts and hashtags used for Zoombombing.

Teenagers running those accounts told the news outlet that they found Zoomraiding a way to escape completing school work.

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Zooms Founder and CEO Eric Yuan has apologized for the privacy and security issues being reported in his app that has seen a surge in usage globally as people work from home during lockdowns. (IANS)