Monday October 14, 2019

Feeling homesick? Go for Animal-assisted Therapy to lead a satisfactory Life!

The participants who took eight weeks of dog therapy experienced significant reductions in homesickness and a greater increase in satisfaction with life

2
//
Dog Therapy. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
  • According to a research, Animal-assisted therapy may help first-year college students overcome homesickness and may help lower drop-out rates
  • The therapy includes 45-minute weekly sessions involving small group interactions with dogs and their handlers, and engagement with fellow students from the study
  • In a 2009 report conducted for B.C. Stats, 29 percent students who wanted to drop out, decided to stay

Toronto, Sept 09, 2016: Animal-assisted therapy can help first-year university students combat homesickness and could also be a useful tool in lowering drop-out rates, finds an interesting research.

Homesick students are three times more likely than those who manage their homesickness to disengage and drop out of university, the researchers said.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

“Transitioning from high school to university can prove to be a challenge for many first-year students,” said John Tyler Binfet, Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Okanagan, Canada.

In the study, the participants who completed eight weeks of dog therapy experienced significant reductions in homesickness and a greater increase in satisfaction with life.

Participants reported that sessions “felt like they were at home chatting with friends who brought their puppies.”

But the non-treatment group reported an increase in their feelings of homesickness, the study said.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

Dog therapy included 45-minute weekly sessions involving small group interactions with dogs and handlers, and engagement with other first-year students participating in the study.

For the study, published in the journal Anthrozoos, 44 first year university students who self-identified as homesick were given a survey to measure levels of homesickness, satisfaction with life and connectedness with the campus.

Half of the students completed eight weeks of dog therapy, while the other half were informed that their sessions would begin in eight weeks’ time.

A total of 29 per cent of students who dropped out cited more interactions and friendships with other students as a factor that would have influenced their decision to stay longer, according to a 2009 report conducted for B.C. Stats — the statistics agency for British Columbia in Canada.

“Moving to a new city, I did not know anyone at the university and became very homesick and depressed. I was mainly secluded in my dorm room and did not feel like I belonged here. Coming to animal assisted therapy sessions every Friday gave me a sense of purpose and kept me enthusiastic about life,” stated Varenka Kim, a student at UBC Okanagan. (IANS)

  • Manthra koliyer

    Dog therapies can be one the best ways to solve all the problems people face.

  • Jagpreet Kaur Sandhu

    Wow! Sounds interesting, as they say dogs can be our best friends.

Next Story

Dog Ownership Leads to Longer Life And Healthy Heart

Studies Show that Dog ownership alleviates social isolation, improves physical activity and lowers blood pressure

0
Dog
Keeping a dog is a good motivation for physical activity, which is an important factor in rehabilitation and mental health. Pixabay

A dog at home means longer life and better cardiovascular health, especially for heart attack and stroke survivors who live alone, according to a new study and a separate meta-analysis on the subject.

Prior studies have shown that dog ownership alleviates social isolation, improves physical activity and even lowers blood pressure.

“The two new studies provide good, quality data indicating dog ownership is associated with reduced cardiac and all-cause mortality,” said Glenn N.Levine, Chair of the writing group of the American Heart Association’s scientific statement on pet ownership.

Researchers in this study compared the health outcomes of dog owners and non-owners after a heart attack or stroke using health data provided by the Swedish National Patient Register.

The patients studied were Swedish residents aged 40-85 who experienced a heart attack or an ischemic stroke from 2001-2012.

Dog
Having a dog is associated with increased physical exercise, lower blood pressure levels and better cholesterol. Pixabay

Compared to people who did not own a dog, researchers found that for dog owners, the risk of death for heart attack patients living alone after hospitalization was 33 per cent lower, and 15 per cent lower for those living with a partner or child.

The risk of death for stroke patients living alone after hospitalization was 27 per cent lower and 12 per cent lower for those living with a partner or child.

In the study, nearly 182,000 people were recorded to have had a heart attack, with almost 6 per cent being dog owners, and nearly 155,000 people were recorded to have had an ischemic stroke, with almost 5 per cent being dog owners.

The lower risk of death associated with dog ownership could be explained by an increase in physical activity and the decreased depression and loneliness, both of which have been connected to dog ownership in previous studies.

Dog
Compared to people who do not own a dog, Study says that for dog owners, the risk of death for heart attack patients living alone after hospitalization is 33 per cent lower. Pixabay

“Keeping a dog is a good motivation for physical activity, which is an important factor in rehabilitation and mental health,” said Tove Fall, professor at Uppsala University in Sweden.

In the meta-analysis, Researchers reviewed patient data of over 3.8 million people taken from 10 separate studies for a composite meta-analysis study.

Researchers found that compared to non-owners, dog owners experienced a 24 per cent reduced risk of all-cause mortality, 65 per cent reduced risk of mortality after heart attack; and 31 per cent reduced risk of mortality due to cardiovascular-related issues.

“Having a dog was associated with increased physical exercise, lower blood pressure levels and better cholesterol profile in previous reports,” said Caroline Kramer, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto.

ALSO READ: Microsoft Planning to Launch a New Keyboard with Emoji Menu

The findings of the study and meta-analysis were published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a journal of the American Heart Association. (IANS)