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Find out How ‘Shiva Linga’ in Hinduism is related to Science

Each Linga comprises of 'Har' that is Lord Shiva and 'Hari' who is Lord Vishnu

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Shiva Linga. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Hiranyagarbha is beginning of life and is a formula that is complete within itself and does not require any organ to reproduce
  • Like structure of DNA, which is double helix; Shiva Linga also represents double helix structure
  • Each Linga comprises of a ‘Har’ that is Lord Shiva and ‘Hari’ who is Lord Vishnu

Lord Shiva is the fundamental God of Hindus. He is worshipped in many forms bust most common form is Shiva Linga. As birth of Lord Shiva cannot be traced, we worship in form of Linga. The word “Linga” itself means symbol. The twelve Shiva Lingas or Jyotirlingas are worshipped by people all over the country.

A Shiva Linga comprises of three parts- top, middle and bottom part. The lowermost part has four sides and is underground while the middle part has eight sides and remains on pedestal. The part we actually worship is a top most part which is round and resembles like egg. This egg is sometimes referred to cosmic egg or what people generally call ‘Brahmanda’.

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As we know base structure of any life form is DNA and RNA. It is related to shiva linga. Here is the explanation.

Hiranyagarbha is beginning of life and is a formula that is complete within itself and does not require any organ to reproduce. It reproduces from one to two, two to four and so on like DNA which consists of genetic code and reproduces on its own. Like structure of DNA, which is double helix; Shiva Linga also represents double helix structure. Number of snakes wrapped around Shiva Linga in form of double helix.

4 heads of Shiva Linga (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
4 heads of Shiva Linga (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Some of the incidents in Mahabharata describes that Lord Shiva had four heads each in one direction. Just like DNA and RNA have four mononucleotides in each direction- Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine and Thymine (Uracil in case of RNA). Like each nucleotide has three components – Sugar, base and Phosphoric acid, Shiva also had 3 eyes in each head.

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When Shiva Linga originated, rishis thought that each Linga comprises of a ‘Har’ that is Lord Shiva and ‘Hari’ who is Lord Vishnu. One can easily found that Jalhari consists of 3 lines. Three in Sanskrit means ‘many’ or ‘multiple’. The sage imagines ‘Har’ is neutron and ‘Hari’ is proton inside nucleus. Lord Brahma is considered as electrons. This means that Lord Brahma is circulating around Hari as electrons revolve around nucleus.

Since neutrons have no charge, it is protons which held electrons in their orbits. This has been picturised as Hari (Lord Vishnu) ties up Brahma through thread attached to his naval. He is coordinating with Hari after creating nature and looks after it. Shiva is a neutron and just like a neutron is neutral and consists no charge, Shiva is also neutral and meditates alone in Himalayas.

Lord Shiva meditating (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Lord Shiva meditating. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

When a nucleus is broken or destroyed, a destructive energy releases. Similarly many epics had shown that if we disturb Lord Shiva energy will be released in form of Rudrani or Kali which would destroy everything.

If one looks at nuclear reactor, it looks like a Shiva Linga or mound. Water is sprinkled continuously on Lord Shiva to keep his temper in control. Hence, temper of Lord Shiva resembles a nuclear reactor.

Shiva Linga has not only religious importance but also scientific importance. Therefore, Shiva is the smallest and largest thing in the World.

-prepared by Aparna Gupta an intern at NewsGram. Twitter @writetoaparna99

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Some Interesting Facts About The Language Of Gods: Sanskrit

Read some interesting facts about the oldest language, the language of gods: Sanskrit

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Sanskrit
Sanskrit was considered as ‘DEV BHASHA’ or ‘DEVAVANI. Pixabay

BY AAYUSH

Sanskrit is one of the oldest languages known to mankind It is also believed to be the most systematic and technical language of all. It is also referred to as the mother of all languages and is the only language that is used in holy functions and ceremonies of the Hindus, as it has always been regarded as the sacred language of the religion and gods. Sanskrit mantras, when recited in combination with the sound vibrations, have a specific effect on the mind and the psyche of the individual.

Sanskrit is the vehicle through which we have been fortunate to be gifted with the Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagvat Gita, and the two great epics Ramayana and Mahabharata. It is the only language that is used in holy functions and ceremonies of the Hindus, as it has always been regarded as the sacred language of the religion. Sanskrit mantras, when recited in combination with the sound vibrations, have a specific effect on the mind and the psyche of the individual.

10 Interesting Facts About the Sanskrit Language

 

Sanskrit language when recited is no less than a beautiful melody is a mystery in itself. Here are 10 interesting facts about the Sanskrit Language.

1. The Language of the Gods

Sanskrit was considered as ‘DEV BHASHA’ or ‘DEVAVANI’, the Language of the Gods by ancient Indians. The script is called DEVNAGARI which means used in the cities of the Gods. It was believed to have been generated by the god Brahma who passed it to the Rishis (sages) living in celestial abodes, who then communicated the same to their earthly disciples from where it spread on earth.

Sanskrit
The Sanskrit language is the oldest language and many other languages are taken from it. Vedicfeed

2. The oldest language in the world

Sanskrit is believed to be one of the oldest languages in the world. The Vedas, the oldest extant texts in any language, were written in Sanskrit.  The earliest form of Sanskrit language was Vedic Sanskrit that came approximately around 1500B.C, a period when knowledge was imparted orally through generations.

3. An innovative language

An old, yet, a highly technical, systematic language of the world. Following research, a report given by the NASA scientist, Rick Briggs, Sanskrit is one of the most suitable languages for computers. It is considered to be very efficient in making algorithms.

4. A language without a default script

Sanskrit did not have a “default” script (like Devanagari- Hindi) until very recently, i.e. less than 200 years back. It was written by everyone in the regional script of their region, in over two dozen scripts. This may make it the language that has been written in the most number of scripts.

Sanskrit culture had a great reluctance towards writing, and this continued for at least a millennium before the first texts were penned. Yet there are as many as 30 million Sanskrit manuscripts with around 7 million manuscripts preserved in India itself. This precisely means that the magnitude of work in Sanskrit surpasses that of Greek and Latin put together!

5. Sanskrit Newspapers and Radios

Sanskrit daily news and newspapers exist even today. It is the language of more than 90 weeklies, fortnightlies, and quarterlies published across India. Gujarat started publishing Vartman Patram and Vishwasya Vrittantam five years back and an all India Radio has been broadcasting daily news in Sanskrit once a day since the year 1974. ‘Sudharma’, the newspaper is published out of Mysore, a historic city in Karnataka, India. It has been running since 1970 and is now available online as an e-paper.

Sanskrit
Even though Sanskrit is old, yet, it is highly technical and systematic. Pixabay

6. Sanskrit speaking hamlets

There are still many villages in India where Sanskrit is still the primary language of communication. The villagers also insist the visitors converse in Sanskrit with them. Banter, greetings, quarrels on the streets, teaching – it’s all in Sanskrit here.

7. A Spiritual Language

The word “Sanskrit’ is a combination of two words – “Sanskar’ and “Krit’; “Krit’ meaning “Inculcating’ and “Sanskar’ meaning “Essence of Moral Values’. Thus Sanskrit means a language that has the capacity to indoctrinate higher values in an individual, the self.

8. A highly versatile language

Sanskrit has the power to say something using the minimum amount of words. There are numerous synonyms for each word each with specific meaning in the language of Sanskrit. For instance, a simple word like the elephant has about a hundred synonyms. English has only one word for love, Sanskrit has 96.

Sanskrit has an amazing wealth of words and synonyms to give great versatility. It has in fact over 70 words for water where English has just got one. Amazingly the Sanskrit language has over 122 words for the action to go each with the specific meaning.

9. The master of Phonetics

Sanskrit is perhaps one of the most accurate languages in pronunciation. It makes use of 49 types of sounds that make pronunciations of different kinds of words very distinct. The attention devoted to the grammar, phonetics, and linguistics in Sanskrit is believed to have been unprecedented until the 20th century.

10. Increases brain power

Sanskrit has also been proven to help in speech therapy. Research suggests that learning the language improves brain functioning and students improve academically; they get better marks in subjects like Mathematics and Science which some people find difficult. It is because Sanskrit enhances memory power and concentration.

Also Read: Revival Of Indian Economy: PM Modi Is Doing His Job, What About Others ?

James Junior School in London has made Sanskrit compulsory. Students of this school are among the toppers in various fields and worldwide exams year after year. Some schools in Ireland also have made Sanskrit compulsory. (VedicFeed)

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Education: The Aptitude Decides Stream or Stream Decides Aptitude?

Why is science stream considered the most superior?

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Stream
Students are supposed to make a choice between 3 streams- Science, Commerce and Humanities. Pixabay

By Muskan Bhatnagar

Here we are again, it’s that time of the year when school students are promoted to the next grade. While 10th class students are promoted to 11th Standard, they’re supposed to choose a stream among the three- Science, Commerce and Humanities/Arts.

The Science stream happens to be the most popular among the three. Possibly everything can be pursued under the field of Science. With Commerce, the career options narrow down and similarly, Humanities provide the least number of career choices. No, these aren’t facts, but mere observations of people.

Science stream is considered to be the toughest of all three, whereas Humanities is seen as the easiest one. “History is just about mugging up things!”, “What is Business Studies in comparison to Physics?”, “Only the intelligent ones opt for Science and the failures end up in Humanities and Commerce “. These are a few taunts every non-science student must’ve come across at least once in their lives.

Since the beginning, Science is considered to be the most elite and Ideal stream. More than a subject, Indian families consider science as a part of their ‘family honor’. If a child doesn’t take up science after 10th then it is considered as an act of rebel and immaturity.

Science stream
Many students are pushed into science by their families against their will. Pixabay

And hence, most of the families force their kids to take up science.

The main issue lies with the thinking and the old mindset of parents and society. If a child doesn’t opt for science then the whole society especially the relatives of the family think that the child must be poor in studies or don’t want to work hard.

Unfortunately, opting for science increases the child’s social status and has a lot to do with prestige issues.

The fact that doors to all possible career options remain open with the science stream is a major factor in pushing kids into science against their will. Parents tend to overlook their child’s interests and aptitude. To them, science is a tried, tested, and full proof career option for their kids. They’re not completely aware of the options they can avail in other streams. And even if they are, who wants to take the road less traveled?

And therefore, once again, kids are forced to take up science.

“If your brother can do it, then why can’t you?”, “You have 3 different tuitions and you still can’t do it?”, “What are you going to do in Humanities? There’s no scope!” and so on. No importance is given to the fact that every child has a different aptitude and every child has his/her field of interest.

Forced stream
Every hour a student commits suicide in India. Pixabay

Imposing such decisions on kids can have major consequences. Do you know, every one hour a student commits suicide in India? And the others silently and secretly suffer from depression, anxiety, intellectual disability, etc just to live up to the expectations of their families.

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If a child is good at something or interested in a particular stream, then what is so wrong about it? Can’t we trust our kids enough that they’ll shine in the stream of their choice? Can we not show others that our kids can be successful in all the streams? Can we not support and encourage our children to excel in the field of their choice?

To guide and to enforce are two completely different things. For once, let’s guide our kids in their journey and not force them, overlooking all the taunts from society. Let’s support them in the field of their choice and watch them shine bright in the future.

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Lord Shiva: Man, Myth or Divine? Explains Sadhguru

Sadhguru stresses upon the fact that more often Shiva is described as a non-being

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Sadhguru
Sadhguru has stressed upon this fact that if you read through the Shiva Purana, you cannot identify Shiva as a good person or a bad person. Twitter

By Kashish Rai

“The word ‘Shiva’ means literally, that ‘which is not’. On another level when we say ‘Shiva’, we are referring to a certain Yogi, the Adiyogi or the first Yogi and also the Adi Guru, the first Guru.”

~ Sadhguru

“Shiva” who is known as Mahadeva is one of the chief deities of Hindus. He is considered as the supreme being within ‘Shaivism’, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism. He is known as “The Destroyer” within the Trimurti, the Hindu Trinity that includes Brahma and Vishnu.

With context to the Hindu Mythology, Shiva is the supreme being who creates, protects and transforms the Universe~ But Shiva is beyond this identity. Who is Shiva? Is he a god or a construct of collective imagination? Or is there a deeper meaning to Shiva? Revealed only to those who seek? Jaggi Vasudev, an Indian yogi and author popularly known as “Sadhguru” explains it all!

Sadhguru says, “Today, modern science is proving to us that everything comes from nothing and goes back to nothing. The basis of existence and the fundamental quality of the cosmos is vast nothingness. The galaxies are just a small happening – a sprinkling. The rest is all vast empty space, which is referred to as Shiva. That is the womb from which everything is born, and that is the oblivion into which everything is sucked back. Everything comes from Shiva and goes back to Shiva.”

Shiva
“Shiva” who is known as Mahadeva is one of the chief deities of Hindus. He is considered as the supreme being within ‘Shaivism’, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism. Twitter

Sadhguru also stresses upon the fact that more often Shiva is described as a non-being. He is not described as the light but as darkness. Here, Sadhguru describes that the light is not eternal in comparison to the darkness. He says, “Light is not eternal. It is always a limited possibility because it happens and it ends. Darkness is a much bigger possibility than light. Nothing needs to burn, it is always – it is eternal. Darkness is everywhere. It is the only thing that is all pervading.”

Sadhguru tells that in some places in the west, Shiva is considered to be a Demon!

He says that if we look at it as a concept, there isn’t a more intelligent concept on the planet about the whole process of creation and how it has happened.

Shiva: Being the Adiyogi & One and The Same!

Sadhguru further explains that “Shiva refers to both “that which is not,” and Adiyogi, because in many ways, they are synonymous. This being, who is a yogi, and that non-being, which is the basis of the existence, are the same, because to call someone a yogi means he has experienced the existence as himself.”

When we talk about Shiva as “that which is not,” and Shiva as a yogi, in a way they are synonymous, yet they are two different aspects. Because India is a dialectical culture, we shift from this to that and that to this effortlessly. One moment we talk about Shiva as the ultimate, the next moment we talk about Shiva as the man who gave us this whole process of yoga.

Adiyogi
A Still of Adiyogi Statue of Lord Shiva at Coimbatore which is 112.4 ft tall. It has been recognized as the Largest Best Sculpture by the Guinness World Records. The founder of Isha Foundation, Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev designed the statue and was inaugurated by Honourable PM Sh. Narendra Modi in 2017.

Shiva is Beyond Any Perception!

Sadhguru has stressed upon the fact that Shiva is beyond the image and perception of what people see in through Indian Calender art.

He says that, “Calender Artists have made him a chubby-cheeked, blue-colored man because a calendar artist has only one face. Why would a yogi like Shiva look chubby-cheeked? If you showed him skinny it would be okay, but a chubby-cheek Shiva – how is that?”

In the yogic culture, Shiva is not seen as a God. He was a being who walked this land and lived in the Himalayan region. As the very source of the yogic traditions, his contribution in the making of human consciousness is too phenomenal to be ignored.

 Devotional Manifestation: Ancient Shiva Temples

Sadhguru says that in India since the the Ancient times, temples were built mostly for Shiva. It was only in the last 1000 or so years that other temples came up.

He writes, “The word Shiva literally means ‘that which is not.’ So the temple was built for ‘that which is not.’ ‘That which is’ is physical manifestation; ‘that which is not’ is that which is beyond the physical.”

There are thousands of Shiva temples in the country, and most of them don’t have any form as such. They just have a representative form and generally it is a linga.

Dhyanlinga
A Still of Dhyanlinga, a yogic temple near Coimbatore, India. Twitter

“The Adiyogi Shiva does not belong to the past, he belongs to the future”

At many places, Sadhguru has stressed upon this fact that if you read through the Shiva Purana, you cannot identify Shiva as a good person or a bad person. He is Sundaramurthy, the most beautiful. At the same time, nobody can be more horrible than him!

Shiva is a terrible combination of everything put together…

(About Sadhguru: Named one of India’s 50 most influential people, Sadhguru is a yogi, mystic, a bestselling author & poet. Sadhguru has been conferred the “Padma Vibhushan” by the Government of India in 2017, the highest amongst the annual civilian awards, accorded for exceptional and distinguished service.)