Monday February 26, 2018

Former Catholic Nuns Isabel and Federica fall in love, register same-sex Civil Union in Italy

Serafino Ferrino, refused to conduct the civil union, claiming they were morally "wrong" and that many Italian mayors agreed with him

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Italian Nuns
Two Nuns Waiting Together. Representational image. Pixabay
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  • Former Catholic nuns, Isabel and Federica, registered a  same-sex civil union and renounced their vows in North-west Italy on Wednesday, after falling in love
  • The civil union ceremony took place in Pinerolo on the outskirts of Turin and was conducted by the town’s mayor, Luca Salvai
  • Italy’s parliament voted civil unions – including same-sex partnerships – into law in May after the government won a confidence motion on the fiercely debated bill

Pinerolo, Italy, Sept 28, 2016: Two former Catholic nuns registered a same-sex civil union in northwest Italy on Wednesday after they fell in love and renounced their vows, media reports said.

“God wants people to be happy and to live their love openly,” Turin-based daily La Stampa quoted one of the ex-nuns named Isabel as saying.

“We call on our Church to welcome all people who love each other,” said the other nun, named Francesca, quoted by La Stampa.

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The civil union ceremony took place in Pinerolo on the outskirts of Turin and was conducted by the town’s mayor, Luca Salvai, a member of Italy’s grassroots Five Star movement.

La Stampa described the couple as two 44-year-old former Franciscan Sisters, who met on a pilgrimage. Isabel is from Latin America, and Federica is from Italy, according to the daily.

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A priest who was suspended from the priesthood in 2003 because of his support for gay marriage, Franco Barbero, was also going to bless the couple and has already done this for 19 gay couples this year, it reported.

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Gay activists on Tuesday lodged a complaint with prosecutors and police against a Catholic mayor in Favria on the outskirts of Turin who refused to officiate a civil union between two men.

Serafino Ferrino, refused to conduct the civil union, claiming they were morally “wrong” and that many Italian mayors agreed with him.

The Gay Centre rights group said it was taking action against all town and city councils who don’t apply the legislation which legalised same-sex partnerships in Italy earlier this year.

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Italy’s parliament voted civil unions – including same-sex partnerships – into law in May after the government won a confidence motion on the fiercely debated bill.

Italy was the last in Western Europe to adopt such reforms and the legislation was heavily diluted due to staunch opposition from the Catholic Church, Catholic groups, and conservative Catholic politicians as well as divisions within the ruling centre-left Democratic Party. (IANS)

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  • Anubhuti Gupta

    Love brings people together in the most astonishing ways

  • Antara

    Eventually, love overcomes everything!!

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‘In Standing up for Herself, Edie Also Stood up for Millions of Americans’, Tweets Bill Clinton as the World Mourns the Death of Gay Rights Activist Edith Windsor

Paying his tribute to Edie, former US President Barack Obama rightly said, "Few were as small in stature as Edie Windsor - and few made as big a difference to America."

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Edith Windsor
Edie dearly loved the LGBTQ community which loved her right back and held her in reverence for her fight for freedom, equality, and justice. Wikemedia

New York, September 13, 2017 Gay rights activist Edith Windsor, whose same-sex marriage fight led to a landmark US ruling, has died aged 88.

Her death was confirmed to the New York Times by her wife Judith Kasen-Windsor. She died in New York.

“The world lost a tiny but tough-as-nails fighter for freedom, justice and equality,” the BBC quoted Kasen-Windsor as saying.

“Edie was the light of my life. She will always be the light for the LGBTQ community, which she loved so much and which loved her right back,” she added.

Edith Windsor’s Supreme Court case struck down the Defence of Marriage Act in 2013, granting same-sex married couples federal recognition for the first time.

She had sued the US government after being ordered to pay $363,053 in federal estate tax after her previous wife, Thea Spyer, died. The couple had been partners for 44 years and had married in Canada in 2007.

Windsor, known as Edie, argued that the provision of the law which defined marriage as between a man and a woman prevented her from getting a tax deduction due to married couples – and was “unconstitutional”.

In the landmark 2013 ruling, the US Supreme Court agreed – and that decision became the basis for a wave of further court rulings increasing the rights of same-sex couples.

In 2015, another crucial Supreme Court ruling gave same-sex couples the right to marry.

Remembering the gay rights trailblazer Edith Windsor, former US Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama also paid their tributes.

“Few were as small in stature as Edie Windsor – and few made as big a difference to America,” Obama said. While Clinton tweeted: “In standing up for herself, Edie also stood up for millions of Americans…” (IANS)