Tuesday March 19, 2019

Genes to Decide What Diet Suits You Best

Soon, genetic testing may identify what diet you should consume for a longer, healthier life

0
//
Genes to decide what diet suits you best.
Genes to decide what diet suits you best. Pixabay

Soon, genetic testing may identify what diet you should consume for a longer, healthier life.

Researchers have identified a group of genes that allow an organism to adapt to different diets and show that without them, even minor tweaks to diet can cause premature aging and death.

“The studies have revealed that single gene mutations can alter the ability of an organism to utilise a specific diet. This could explain why certain diets work for some but not others,” explained Sean Curran, assistant professor at University of Southern California (USC).

In the age of commercial gene sequencing, people might be able to identify which diet would work best for them through a simple blood test, added Shanshan Pang from USC.

Genes are a part of DNA/RNA.
Genes- A segment of DNA. Pixabay

They studied caenorhabditis elegans – a one-milimetre-long worm that scientists have used as a model organism for years.

Curran and Pang identified a gene called ‘alh-6’ which delayed the effects of aging depending on what type of diet the worm was fed by protecting it against diet-induced mitochondrial defects.

“What we have learned in the worm could translate to a better understanding of the factors that alter diet success in humans,” Curran said in the study appeared in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Also Read: Night Shifts, Jet Lag Disrupt Rhythm of Genes

Finding a genetic basis for an organism’s dietary needs suggests that different individuals may be genetically predisposed to thrive on different diets.

This could be the start of personalised dieting based on an individual’s genetic makeup, Curran stressed. (IANS)

Next Story

Check out the 9 Genes Responsible For Eyebrow Colours

Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the pigmentation genes will help improve the treatment of these diseases

0
Get Those Expressive Eyes With Perfect Eyebrows
Get Those Expressive Eyes With Perfect Eyebrows. Pixabay

An international research team has for the first time identified nine genes responsible for eyebrow colours.

Eyebrow colour is one of the most recognisable visual traits of the human body. It has a strong correlation with hair colour, but scientists believe in the existence of overlapping and unique genetic components for both traits.

Previous studies on human eyes, hair, and skin colour have identified multiple gene variants, but no findings for eyebrow colour have been reported as of yet.

For the new study, researchers from China, the Netherlands, Australia, Britain and the US analysed samples of 6,513 European individuals, and graded colours into four categories: red, blond, brown and black, Xinhua reported.

They found that eight genes, previously known pigmentation genes, could affect both eyebrow and hair colour, such as gene variant MC1R, responsible for both blond eyebrows and red hair.

In addition, C10orf11 is the newly-identified gene that only affects eyebrow colours.

Beware of too-thin brows as it can actually make you look older.
Beware of too-thin brows as it can actually make you look older. Pixabay

With these findings, researchers developed an eyebrow colour prediction model and are ready to improve it by studying the different age distributions.

Such a DNA-based eyebrow colour prediction model would improve the human phenotype research and be useful in future forensic applications, said lead author Liu Fan, researcher at the Beijing Institute of Genomics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

“Based on the new discoveries, we can more accurately infer individual hair, eyes, skin, eyebrow colour and other phenotypic information just from a DNA sample,” Fan said in the paper published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

Also Read- Nose of Kids Hold Clues to Serious Lung Infections

Eyebrow colour is controlled by genes that affect production of pigment. Melanin, for example, is a protective pigment that can block the ultraviolet radiation. Melanin-related gene abnormalities can lead to many diseases, such as albinism, and increase the risk of skin cancer.

Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the pigmentation genes will help improve the treatment of these diseases, the researchers noted. (IANS)