Sunday June 16, 2019

Genes to Decide What Diet Suits You Best

Soon, genetic testing may identify what diet you should consume for a longer, healthier life

0
//
Genes to decide what diet suits you best.
Genes to decide what diet suits you best. Pixabay

Soon, genetic testing may identify what diet you should consume for a longer, healthier life.

Researchers have identified a group of genes that allow an organism to adapt to different diets and show that without them, even minor tweaks to diet can cause premature aging and death.

“The studies have revealed that single gene mutations can alter the ability of an organism to utilise a specific diet. This could explain why certain diets work for some but not others,” explained Sean Curran, assistant professor at University of Southern California (USC).

In the age of commercial gene sequencing, people might be able to identify which diet would work best for them through a simple blood test, added Shanshan Pang from USC.

Genes are a part of DNA/RNA.
Genes- A segment of DNA. Pixabay

They studied caenorhabditis elegans – a one-milimetre-long worm that scientists have used as a model organism for years.

Curran and Pang identified a gene called ‘alh-6’ which delayed the effects of aging depending on what type of diet the worm was fed by protecting it against diet-induced mitochondrial defects.

“What we have learned in the worm could translate to a better understanding of the factors that alter diet success in humans,” Curran said in the study appeared in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Also Read: Night Shifts, Jet Lag Disrupt Rhythm of Genes

Finding a genetic basis for an organism’s dietary needs suggests that different individuals may be genetically predisposed to thrive on different diets.

This could be the start of personalised dieting based on an individual’s genetic makeup, Curran stressed. (IANS)

Next Story

Diet Rich in Calories Cause Brain Health to Deteriorate Faster

High calorie diet causes brain health to decline faster: Study

0
Sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease, Kepler, NASA, tissue
A researcher takes a tissue sample from a human brain at the Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s UK Tissue Bank, at Imperial College London, Britain June 3, 2016. An appendix, often considered useless, seems to store an abnormal protein, which if it makes its way into the brain, has been found to become a hallmark of Parkinson's. VOA

The unhealthy habits of modern-day living with a diet high in calories may cause brain health to deteriorate faster, according to an Australian study published on Thursday.

Compared to 50 years ago, people currently consume an average of around 650 extra kilocalories each day, which is equivalent to a fast-food meal of a burger, fries and a soft drink, said the study’s lead author, Nicolas Cherbuin of the Australian National University (ANU).

“People are eating away at their brain with a really bad fast-food diet and little-to-no exercise,” Cherbuin, who is a professor at the ANU Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, said in a statement.

“We’ve found strong evidence that people’s unhealthy eating habits and lack of exercise for sustained periods of time puts them at serious risk of developing type 2 diabetes and significant declines in brain function, such as dementia and brain shrinkage,” he added.

Maintain the level of calories to 1600 a day by eating the right amount of portion of the healthy foods
Britain urges people to reduce calories intake to 1600 a day. Wikimedia Commons

According to the study, 30 per cent of the global adult population is either overweight or obese, and over 10 per cent of the world’s adult population will have type 2 diabetes by 2030, reports Efe news.

The expert pointed out that while the link between this type of diabetes and the deterioration of brain function has long been known, research shows that the loss of neurons and their functions begins “much, much earlier”, indicating “a clear association between this brain deterioration and unhealthy lifestyle choices”.

Also Read- If You Can’t Reach Cloud, We’ll Bring it to Your Backyard, Says AWS CEO

“People eating too much of the wrong kind of food, particularly fast food, is the other big worry,” according to the expert, who warned that advice for people to reduce their risk of brain problems, including their risk of dementia, begin too late, mostly when people are in their 60s or later.

“The damage done is pretty much irreversible once a person reaches midlife, so we urge everyone to eat healthy and get in shape as early as possible – preferably in childhood but certainly by early adulthood,” Cherbuin said. (IANS)