Thursday November 21, 2019
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Get Perfect Beach Holiday Skin

Jill Zander, founder of the Jill Zander Skin Rejuvenation Clinic, shares tips to keep skin looking beautiful in the summer sun and beyond, rpeorts femalefirst.co.uk:

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Get Perfect Beach Holiday Skin
Get Perfect Beach Holiday Skin. Pixabay

People love holidaying on beach, but they do not know how to keep their skin glowing. Expert gives tip to protect skin to have that beautiful beach holiday look.

Jill Zander, founder of the Jill Zander Skin Rejuvenation Clinic, shares tips to keep skin looking beautiful in the summer sun and beyond, rpeorts femalefirst.co.uk:

* Sun protection: Use a sunblock daily. Always include your neck, décolleté and backs of hands and reapply frequently. Wear a hat and large lensed sunglasses.

* Antioxidants: We become more sensitive as we get older to external stresses, as a result of free radicals produced by environmental pollution, car exhaust fumes, UVA and UVB and cigarette smoke. Invest in a scientifically proven home care regime to protect your skin with vital nutrients providing good antioxidant protection enriched with vitamins C and E.

Summer-Proof
Representational image. Pixabay

* Repair sun damage: When it comes to sun damage, vitamin A is the most valuable skin care nutrients applied to the skin. Vitamin A helps to smooth sun damage, giving less wrinkled skin and also helps to even out skin tone.

* Use a good facial scrub: It is required to remove oil, dirt, impurities and dead cells to improve texture and restore natural glow. Do it at night only.

Also Read: How to get Revitalised and Youthful Skin

* Summer scent: Never apply fragrance to the skin in the day. Oil of Bergamot, often used as a fixative, can cause photo sensitivity and pigmentary problems. Only apply in the evening. (Bollywood Country)

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Skin Exposure to UVB Light Alters Gut Bacteria For Good: Study

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome

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UVB
UVB Light causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, it has so far been shown only in rodents. Pixabay

Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans — possibly via vitamin D which can help explain the protective role of UVB in inflammatory diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Sun exposure, vitamin D levels and the mix of bacteria in our gut are each associated with risk of inflammatory conditions like MS and IBD, said scientists from University of British Columbia.

Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome.

However, that UVB, therefore, causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, has so far been shown only in rodents.

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome.

Healthy female volunteers were given three, one-minute sessions of full-body UVB exposure in a single week.

Before and after treatment, stool samples were taken for analysis of gut bacteria – as well blood samples for vitamin D levels.

Skin UVB exposure significantly increased gut microbial diversity, but only in subjects who were not taking vitamin D supplements.

UVB
Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome. Pixabay

“Prior to UVB exposure, these women had a less diverse and balanced gut microbiome than those taking regular vitamin D supplements,” reported Professor Bruce Vallance, who led the University of British Columbia study.

“UVB exposure boosted the richness and evenness of their microbiome to levels indistinguishable from the supplemented group, whose microbiome was not significantly changed”.

Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, the analysis suggests that vitamin D mediates the change — which could help explain the protective effect of UVB light in inflammatory diseases like MS and IBD.

The largest effect was an increase in the relative abundance of “Lachnospiraceae” bacteria after the UVB light exposures.

This indicates that vitamin D at least partly mediates UVB-induced gut microbiome changes.

The study is not designed to show the exact mechanism by which the microbiome changes occur, but both UVB and vitamin D are known to influence the immune system.

UVB
Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans. Pixabay

“It is likely that exposure to UVB light somehow alters the immune system in the skin initially, then more systemically, which in turn affects how favourable the intestinal environment is for the different bacteria,” suggests Vallance.

ALSO READ: Re-Assessing The Classical West: Two Emperors And A Sign

The results have implications for people who are undergoing UVB phototherapy, said scientists. (IANS)