Thursday November 15, 2018
Home Business Getting the b...

Getting the best rolling papers – A small guide to having the best experience

Many rolling paper options these days are dangerous because they are infused with chemicals like chlorine. That’s of course not good at all for your body and you should try to avoid those kind of rolling papers as hard as you can.

0
//
rolling papers
Choosing the right rolling papers can make a big difference in how your experience goes overall. (representative image) Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi, November 7, 2017 : Smoking is something that requires you to do some shopping once in a while. Whether you’re new to smoking or have been on SmokeCartel for ages, it doesn’t change the fact that you need to buy rolling papers in order to, well, smoke. However, choosing the right rolling papers can make a big difference in how your experience goes overall. There used to be a time when it was cool not to pay any attention to what you’re using as rolling paper. However, those times are fortunately gone and now consumers such as yourself can make the right decision when it’s time to roll. Here are some tips on how to get the best rolling papers.

The importance of going for the natural choice

Many rolling paper options these days are dangerous because they are infused with chemicals like chlorine. That’s of course not good at all for your body and you should try to avoid those kind of rolling papers as hard as you can. Not only do they put you in harm’s way, but they also tend to change the taste of the herb you’re smoking. Not to mention that if you’re the kind of smoker that likes to keep their herb organic, it would be highly counterproductive to just toss that into the trash in favor of a chemical-filled rolling paper option.

Choosing the best brands

If you want to have the best smoking sessions, you need to invest in the best brands available, which treat rolling papers with care and attention. Here are the names that you want to embed into your smoker memory as soon as possible:

Elements

This company offers great rolling papers, in a cool package that features a small magnet as a mechanism for keeping the package shut when it’s not being used. The papers themselves are of great quality. The rice paper rolls are incredibly thin, and a pack can hold up to 100 leaves depending on the size option you go for.

RAW Organic

RAW Organic offers tan and really thin rolling papers. According to them anyway, the papers are organic and naturally grown. You can’t help but appreciate the craft that goes into making these, but also their effectiveness and resistance. RAW Organic papers are known to be run-resistant.’

Zen Effen

Zen Effen sells their papers in paper packaging. They are naturally grown, hemp gum papers, and represent one of the thinnest options that you have in terms of high quality rolling papers. At least, as far as hemp papers are concerned. Throughout their time on the market, Zen Effen have managed to provide a very high quality combination of great flavor, on-point burn time and resistance.

Skunk Brand

Don’t let the name fool you, as we’re not talking about some newcomers that want to amaze with the name alone. They have actually been around since 1994, when they helped popularized hemp papers. These papers are known for their slow burn are made out of pure hemp.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Usage of E-Cigarettes In American Teens Have Reached ‘Epidemic Proportions’: FDA

Gottlieb slammed the e-cigarette makers for approaching the problem of underage use as "a public relations challenge.''

0
e-cigarettes
Do you believe e-cigarettes are a healthier alternative to smoking? Think again. Pixabay

American teens’ use of e-cigarettes has hit “epidemic proportions,” the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in a statement released Wednesday.

In what it called the “largest coordinated enforcement effort in FDA history,” the agency issued written warnings and fines to 1,300 retailers for their role in selling the devices to children.

According to the data cited by the FDA, last year more than 2 million middle school and high school students used the devices, which deliver nicotine in an inhalable form.

In a speech at FDA headquarters, Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said, “The disturbing and accelerating trajectory of use we’re seeing in youth and the resulting path to addiction must end.”

 

e-cigarettes
In this April 11, 2018, photo, an unidentified 15-year-old high school student uses a vaping device near the school’s campus in Cambridge, Mass. Health and education officials across the country are raising alarms over wide underage use of e-cigarettes and other vaping products. The devices heat liquid into an inhalable vapor that’s sold in sugary flavors like mango and mint — and often with the addictive drug nicotine. VOA

 

Until now, the FDA had eyed e-cigarettes as a powerful tool to help adults break their habit of using conventional tobacco products. But research has found little evidence of such products’ effectiveness.

Gottlieb admitted that the agency had neglected to take into account how attractive the flavored products would be to youths.

The commissioner said the FDA would continue to study e-cigarettes as a less harmful alternative for adult smokers, but “that work can’t come at the expense of kids.”

The FDA said it was giving the makers of Juul, Vuse, MarkTen XL, Blu and Logic, the five top-selling brands, 60 days to present the agency with a viable plan to prevent vaping among children. If they fail, it could order the products off the market.

The five brands account for more than 97 percent of U.S. sales, according to the FDA.

 e-cigarettes
Packages of flavored liquids for e-cigarettes are seen displayed at a smoke shop in New York City. VOA

Critics have long argued that the manufacturers of e-cigarettes are deliberately targeting children by offering their products in sugary flavors.

Also Read: Daily Cigarette Smokers Develop Greater Risk of Heart Attack, Says Study

Gottlieb slammed the e-cigarette makers for approaching the problem of underage use as “a public relations challenge.”

“I’m here to tell them today that this prior approach is over,” he said. (VOA)