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Government told not to repeal Sharia inspired bylaws in Jakarta, Indonesia

Some interpretations of Sharia are used to justify cruel crimes such as amputation as well as unequal treatment to women in inheritance, dress, and independence

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A public demonstration in Maldives, calling for Sharia 2014 Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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  • The Mathla’ul Anwar Islamic organization called on the government not to repeal Sharia inspired bylaws
  • Jokowi had earlier said that he would revoke 3,000 problematic bylaws in provinces, cities and regencies across the country
  • Home Minister Tjahjo Kumolo has been instructed by the President to complete the bylaw revocations in July

Justifying sharia inspired bylaws as guardians of the people’s morality, the Mathla’ul Anwar Islamic organization called on the government not to repeal such bylaws that are in place in many regions across the country.

According to a JakartaPost report, The Chairman of Mathla’ul Anwar, Ahmad Syadeli Karim, while speaking to the press after meeting President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, said that such bylaws are needed to prevent the country from sliding into further moral decadence.

Most of the people are aware of the word ‘Sharia’ but only a few people know what exactly it is. Sharia means “path” in Arabic which guides all facets of Muslim life including daily routines, familial and religious obligations, and financial dealings.

The influence of Sharia on both personal status law and criminal law is highly controversial. Some interpretations are used to justify cruel crimes such as amputation as well as unequal treatment to women in inheritance, dress, and independence.

In today’s world, where everyone needs to focus on ways to promote the idea of equality, such bylaws are following the idea of dominance.

Ahmad said at the State Palace, “We support the government’s efforts to increase investment, but the bylaws that are used to regulate goodness like zakat (obligatory alms for Muslims) for instance, and those that guard morality, should be strengthened, not to be revoked.”

Street protest for Sharia. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Street protest for Sharia. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

People supporting Sharia try to justify it by saying that Muslims around the world are united by a belief in God but executing people just because they were homosexual is something which needs justification too.

A quick Glance over Sharia inspired bylaws:

  • A Muslim who leaves Islam must be killed immediately.
  • A Muslim will be forgiven for murder of: i) an apostate ii) an adulterer iii) a highway robber. Vigilante street justice and honour killing is acceptable.
  • A Muslim will not get the death penalty if he kills a non-Muslim, but will get it for killing a Muslim.
  • Sharia never abolished slavery, sexual slavery and highly regulates it. A master will not be punished for killing his slave.
  • Sharia dictates death by stoning, beheading, amputation of limbs, flogging even for crimes of sin such as adultery.
  • Divorce is only in the hands of the husband and is as simple as saying: “I divorce you” and becomes effective even if the husband did not intend it.

Islam considers Jihad as a duty of every Muslim and Muslim head of State (Caliph). In a previously published article of NewsGram titled ‘Boko Haram: why world is silent on this Jihadi organization?’ it was known that a Jihadi organisation, Boko Haram has killed a number of people people, abducted and raped women and forced schools to close down all in the name of religion.

Jokowi had earlier said that he would revoke 3,000 problematic bylaws in provinces, cities and regencies across the country to try and boost investment in infrastructure projects. Among the bylaws to be scrapped are those inspired by Islamic teachings.

Home Minister Tjahjo Kumolo has been instructed by the President to complete the bylaw revocations in July 2016.

-by Pashchiema, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @pashchiema

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Bangladesh Government Build a New Rohingya Camp

The islet is about 30 kilometers from the mainland.

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View of the island of Bhasan Char in the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh

The Bangladesh government wants to send about 100,000 Rohingya refugees to a muddy, uninhabited island — “formed only in the last 20 years by silt from Bangladesh’s Meghna River” — in the Bay of Bengal.

Nearly 700,000 Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh after fleeing Myanmar following a military crackdown in August 2017.

The use of Bhashan Char Island, however, is being questioned by Human Rights Watch (HRW), which is urging the country to reconsider the move, because six other “feasible relocation sites” have been identified, they say in a report.

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Bangladesh has made some improvements to the islet, including housing for about 100,000 refugees. A look at the development of Bhasan Char, formed by silt deposits from the Meghna River, over the past 20 years. VOA

Most Rohingya are refusing to leave Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar refugee camp.

HRW, in a 68-page report, said the island is not suitable for human life and could become completely submerged in the event of a strong cyclone during a high tide.

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The islet is about 30 kilometers from the mainland. The New York-based organization said the lack of assurance of freedom of movement to and from Bhasan Char and its isolation “would essentially turn the island into a detention center.” (VOA)