Tuesday March 26, 2019
Home Science & Technology Hacker breach...

Hacker breaches US FBI website, leakes personal account information to a Public site: Report

0
//
Hacking (representative image), Pixabay

Moscow, Jan 5, 2017: A hacker has claimed to have breached the US Federal Bureau of Investigation’s website and leaked personal account information to a public site, media reported.

The hacker, known as CyberZeist, exploited a zero-day vulnerability in the highly-secure Plone Content Management System (CMS) of the FBI’s website and leaked some of the information to Pastebin, an open source site that is often used by hackers to post stolen information and bits of code, RT.com reported on Thursday.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

A zero-day fault is a vulnerability in the code that has not been detected, listed, or patched yet. Therefore, the FBI had zero days to respond to the attack.

This is not the first time the hacker claimed breaching the FBI site. In 2011, CyberZeist is believed to have hacked the FBI site as a member of a group known as Anonymous.

Authorities in the US have not yet responded to the recent hacking incident that was claimed to have occurred last month.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“fbi.gov CMS Exploited, files in view – PasswordResetTool.py, product permissions, setup file. More coming soon #FBI #PWNED,” the hacker had tweeted on December 22.

“Don’t blame the #hacker, blame the faulty #code!,” CyberZeist had said in another tweet on December 27.

CyberZeist warned other agencies that are currently using the Plone CMS that they too are vulnerable to a similar attack. “Amnesty acknowledges to patch the Plone #vulnerability in their CMS, just in time!,” CyberZeist said in a recent tweet. (IANS)

Next Story

Networked Freezers at Stores, Work Places at Hacking Risk: Report

Earlier this week, cameras from US-based manufacturer of smart home products Nest were also reported to have been taken over by hackers who were broadcasting potentially terrifying messages

0
Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals
Representational image. Pixabay

Using default passwords on internet-enabled temperature control systems has exposed freezers at grocery stores, hospitals and pharmaceutical firms to the risk of being hacked, the media reported.

Security researchers at Safety Detective found over 7,419 networked thermostats manufactured by Scotland-based electronics manufacturer Resource Data Management (RDM) to be suffering from the vulnerability, Engadget reported on Friday.

On hijacking these devices, the hackers are able to adjust temperatures, change alarms and obtain floor places of facilities where the freezers are located.

Programming
It is very simple to set up, and works by creating code in blocks. Pixabay

The issue with RDM products comes from users failing to follow the necessary steps to secure their products.

“When approached by Safety Detective about the issue, RDM said the issue is related to the use of default passwords and users are encouraged to change them,” the report said.

Also Read- Apple, Google Face Criticism For Hosting Saudi Woman- tracking App

Earlier this week, cameras from US-based manufacturer of smart home products Nest were also reported to have been taken over by hackers who were broadcasting potentially terrifying messages. (IANS)