Wednesday February 19, 2020

Happy Sex Life comes with Hard Work and Effort, says Study

The findings are based on research involving approximately 1,900 participants from both heterosexual and same-sex relationships

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Representational image. Flickr

Toronto, November 8, 2016: The secret to a happy sex life is the belief that it takes hard work and effort, instead of expecting sexual satisfaction to simply happen, says a study.

“Your sex life is like a garden, and it needs to be watered and nurtured to maintain it, says a new study,” said researcher Jessica Maxwell from the University of Toronto.

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These “sexpectations” — the need to work on sexual growth or rely on sexual destiny — are so powerful they can either sustain otherwise healthy relationships or undermine them, she added.

“People who believe in sexual destiny are using their sex life as a barometer for how well their relationship is doing, and they believe problems in the bedroom equal problems in the relationship as a whole,” Maxwell said.

“Whereas people who believe in sexual growth not only believe they can work on their sexual problems, but they are not letting it affect their relationship satisfaction,” she pointed out.

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The findings are based on research involving approximately 1,900 participants from both heterosexual and same-sex relationships.

Maxwell said there is a honeymoon phase lasting about two to three years where sexual satisfaction is high among both sexual growth and sexual destiny believers.

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But the benefit of believing in sexual growth becomes apparent after this initial phase, as sexual desire begins to ebb and flow, she added.

The study, published online in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, showed that, while sexual-growth beliefs can buffer the impact of problems in the bedroom, they do not help as much if the problems become too substantial, Maxwell noted. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Social Media Can Make Break-Ups More Worse

According to a study, many shared stories of encountering exes via their comments in shared spaces

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Even before social media break-ups sucked, but it was much easier to get away from the person. It can make moving on almost impossible if you are constantly being bombarded with reminders in different places online. Pixabay

Estrangement has become harder in the digital age and social media platfroms, such as Facebook and Instagram, can make break-ups much worse, say researchers. People who use features like unfriending, unfollowing or blocking still face troubling encounters with ex-partners online.

For the study, published in the journal ‘Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction’, the researchers recruited people who had upsetting encounter online within 18 months of parting and interviewed them for over an hour.

“Even before social media break-ups sucked, but it was much easier to get away from the person. It can make moving on almost impossible if you are constantly being bombarded with reminders in different places online,” said study lead researcher Anthony Pinter from University of Colorado Boulder in the US.

According to researchers, among 19 who underwent in-depth interviews, a disturbing trend emerged: Even when people took every measure possible to remove their exes from their online lives, social media returned them – often multiple times a day.

“A lot of people assume they can just unfriend their ex or unfollow them, and won’t have to deal with them anymore. Our work shows it’s not the case,” Pinter said. News Feed, the primary interface that opens when one goes for Facebook, was a major source of distress, delivering news of ex-lovers announcing they were in new relationship.

In one case, a participant noticed his roommate had “liked” his ex’s post. He was the last of his friends to know. Memories revived by posts from the past were equally heart-rending, with one participant recalling how a sweet years-old message from his ex-wife popped up out of nowhere delivering an “emotional wallop,” the researchers said.

Hands, Couple, Red X, X, Marked, Stamped, Stigma
Estrangement has become harder in the digital age and social media platfroms, such as Facebook and Instagram, can make break-ups much worse, say researchers. People who use features like unfriending, unfollowing or blocking still face troubling encounters with ex-partners online. Pixabay

According to the study, many shared stories of encountering exes via their comments in shared spaces, such as groups or mutual friends’ pictures. Even when someone unfriends his/her ex, if a mutual friend posts a picture without tagging them that may still flow through their feed.

And even when they blocked their exes some reported that the ex’s friends and family would still show up on Facebook as suggestions under ‘People you may know’. The authors suggest such encounters could be minimised with platform designers paying more attention to the “social periphery” – all those people, groups, photos and events that spring up around a connection between two users.

ALSO READ: Our Government is Working To Eliminate Tuberculosis From The Country by 2025: Union Health Minister Dr. Harsh Vardhan

For those wanting to rid their online lives from reminders of love lost, they recommend unfriending, untagging, using Take a Break and blocking while understanding they may not be foolproof. (IANS)