Wednesday August 15, 2018

Harshvardhan Kapoor: No Interest In Forming Opinion About Anything

The treatment of the film is very different

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Harshvardhan Kapoor No Interest In Forming Opinion About Anything
Harshvardhan Kapoor No Interest In Forming Opinion About Anything, flickr
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“I am someone who is very comfortable in my own world and I know it is not a good thing. I really do not take much interest in forming an opinion on anything political because I am not inclined to that,” Harshvardhan told IANS.

Having grown up in a family of film stars and producers like father Anil Kapoor, sister Sonam Kapoor Ahuja, uncles like Boney Kapoor, Sanjay Kapoor as well as cousins like Arjun Kapoor and Mohit Marwah, Harshvardhan has seen success and failure of the entertainment business from close quarters.

Is that the reason why the end result of the film does not bother him much and he is rather focussed on the process of filmmaking?

Harshvardhan said: “No, that is not true… I do get hurt. When my debut film did not work for most of the people, I was upset but do we really know how to control the fate of a film?

Jacqueline Fernandez and Harshvardhan Kapoor
Jacqueline Fernandez and Harshvardhan Kapoor. flickr

“All we can do is put on hard work. In a year, only 10 films get huge success at the box office out of so many films releasing in India. And what is the definition of success?

“From childhood I have seen, there are films that are counted as most successful film and in two weeks, those films went off the people’s memories. On the other hand, there are films that didn’t work commercially, but people cherish them even today. So what really a successful film is?” questioned the young actor.

As for his “Bhavesh Joshi Superhero” — directed by Vikramaditya Motwane, he believes it has a quality of being relatable to the mass audience.

“The treatment of the film is very different. It is modern and cinematically rich. The inspiration of the core character may be drawn from the angry young man era of our Hindi cinema, but the feet are very much in today’s time.

“It is a realistic film and not a larger than life superhero film. I think the content of the film is quite accessible to the larger audience unlike my ‘Mirzya’,” Harshvardhan said.

The actor believes that the definition of the superhero is changing in Indian cinema where the story of common man is getting celebrated.

“It is the story of a young guy who was leading a regular life with a lot of complaint about the system that we all do, but we really do not do much about it.

“Then he finds himself in extraordinary circumstances and decided to make a choice… a very brave choice that a regular guy will not attempt to do. I think that’s what makes him a superhero.”

Mirziya, Harshvardhan Kapoor & Saiyami Kher
Mirziya, Harshvardhan Kapoor & Saiyami Kher. Flickr

For the film, Harshvardhan went by the script and the director’s vision.

Also, being a formally trained actor, Harshvardhan’s process of immersing himself in a character is a combination of method acting and personal life experiences.

“To bring a certain emotion in a scene, I do not look out for others’ examples, but my own life experiences. Of course, I cannot live life like that character in the film, but in my personal life, I must have experienced something similar.

“Another important thing we have to keep in mind is, in film shooting, we do not shoot the story as sequentially as the audience watch on screen. We might shoot the climax at the beginning of filming.

Also read: I’m so proud to call you my daughter Anil to Rhea

“So when I am performing a scene, I try to understand what the story wants to achieve through the scene. I also use my sense memory.” (IANS)

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‘A Fantastic Woman’ Could Have Been Paramount in Portraying a Transgender Woman’s Struggle

"A Fantastic Woman" fails to carry us along in its protagonist's tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can't wait to get out of it.

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Daniella Vega
'A fantastic Women' seems stretched out. Flickr

Film: “A Fantastic Woman” (Spanish, with English Subtitles, based on a transgender woman); Director: Sebastian Lelio; Starring: Daniela Vega; Rating: 1/2 (2 and a half stars)

“A Fantastic Woman” could have been penetrating portrait of a transgender woman’s struggle for dignity after her middle-aged lover suddenly dies on her.

Marina (played with consummate sensitivity by Daniela Vega) never quite recovers from the traumatic shock. Neither does the film. It quickly goes downhill from the point of tragedy, building what looks like a shell-shocked narrative in-sync with the stupor that falls over Daniela’s soul after Orlando (Francisco Reyes) passes away.

The ensuing trauma of a ‘woman’ who is unacceptable to society for her gender and status in the life of the man she loved, is brought out like a dentist extracting rotten teeth. It is a graceless situation.And director Sebastian Lelio goes with the frown, rendering every crease in Daniela’s disheveled existence in shades of black and fright.

Daniela Vega
Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, makes it seem unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose. Flickr

Daniela’s dilemma is so in-your-face, it hardly needed to be affirmed so strongly by the narrative. Her humiliation is shown in scenes in the hospital and at the police station. And we know what happens to the mistress specially when she is gender-challenged. But Marina’s behaviour post the tragedy eschews empathy. She frets, fumes, snarls and at one point even jumps on to the car of her deceased lover’s family to bounce up and down.

By this point the edgy narrative begins to look uneasily unfocused.

Perhaps Marina’s unconventional methods of protest are a cultural things. Maybe in Chile, the conventions of bereavement are played out at a pitch that seems fairly bizarre to us. Also, the fact that the film is in Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, such as the one where Marina is confronted by Orlando’s wife in a car basement, seems unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose.

Also Read: Eating diorder can be treated in transgenders

“A Fantastic Woman” fails to carry us along in its protagonist’s tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can’t wait to get out of it.

Neither can we. (IANS)