Saturday April 20, 2019

Harshvardhan Kapoor: No Interest In Forming Opinion About Anything

The treatment of the film is very different

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Harshvardhan Kapoor No Interest In Forming Opinion About Anything
Harshvardhan Kapoor No Interest In Forming Opinion About Anything, flickr

“I am someone who is very comfortable in my own world and I know it is not a good thing. I really do not take much interest in forming an opinion on anything political because I am not inclined to that,” Harshvardhan told IANS.

Having grown up in a family of film stars and producers like father Anil Kapoor, sister Sonam Kapoor Ahuja, uncles like Boney Kapoor, Sanjay Kapoor as well as cousins like Arjun Kapoor and Mohit Marwah, Harshvardhan has seen success and failure of the entertainment business from close quarters.

Is that the reason why the end result of the film does not bother him much and he is rather focussed on the process of filmmaking?

Harshvardhan said: “No, that is not true… I do get hurt. When my debut film did not work for most of the people, I was upset but do we really know how to control the fate of a film?

Jacqueline Fernandez and Harshvardhan Kapoor
Jacqueline Fernandez and Harshvardhan Kapoor. flickr

“All we can do is put on hard work. In a year, only 10 films get huge success at the box office out of so many films releasing in India. And what is the definition of success?

“From childhood I have seen, there are films that are counted as most successful film and in two weeks, those films went off the people’s memories. On the other hand, there are films that didn’t work commercially, but people cherish them even today. So what really a successful film is?” questioned the young actor.

As for his “Bhavesh Joshi Superhero” — directed by Vikramaditya Motwane, he believes it has a quality of being relatable to the mass audience.

“The treatment of the film is very different. It is modern and cinematically rich. The inspiration of the core character may be drawn from the angry young man era of our Hindi cinema, but the feet are very much in today’s time.

“It is a realistic film and not a larger than life superhero film. I think the content of the film is quite accessible to the larger audience unlike my ‘Mirzya’,” Harshvardhan said.

The actor believes that the definition of the superhero is changing in Indian cinema where the story of common man is getting celebrated.

“It is the story of a young guy who was leading a regular life with a lot of complaint about the system that we all do, but we really do not do much about it.

“Then he finds himself in extraordinary circumstances and decided to make a choice… a very brave choice that a regular guy will not attempt to do. I think that’s what makes him a superhero.”

Mirziya, Harshvardhan Kapoor & Saiyami Kher
Mirziya, Harshvardhan Kapoor & Saiyami Kher. Flickr

For the film, Harshvardhan went by the script and the director’s vision.

Also, being a formally trained actor, Harshvardhan’s process of immersing himself in a character is a combination of method acting and personal life experiences.

“To bring a certain emotion in a scene, I do not look out for others’ examples, but my own life experiences. Of course, I cannot live life like that character in the film, but in my personal life, I must have experienced something similar.

“Another important thing we have to keep in mind is, in film shooting, we do not shoot the story as sequentially as the audience watch on screen. We might shoot the climax at the beginning of filming.

Also read: I’m so proud to call you my daughter Anil to Rhea

“So when I am performing a scene, I try to understand what the story wants to achieve through the scene. I also use my sense memory.” (IANS)

Next Story

Global Judicial Executions Fell By One-Third In 2018, Reaching Lowest in A Decade

One case it highlighted was the execution of Zeinab Sekaanvand, who reported being a victim of domestic and sexual violence at the age of 17 in West Azerbaijan Province during her "grossly unfair trial" in West Azerbaijan Province.

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Nooses are prepared ahead of a public hanging in Mashhad, Iran. RFERL

The number of known judicial executions around the world declined by nearly one-third in 2018 compared to 2017, reaching the lowest level in at least a decade, Amnesty International says in its annual report on death sentences and executions.

Belarus was among a handful of countries that defied the trend, the human rights group said in the report released on April 10: The only European state that carries out executions put at least four people to death in 2018, it said, twice as many as in 2017.

Although Iran remains “a country where the use of the death penalty is rife,” a change in Iran’s drug laws led to a reduction of executions by “a staggering 50 percent,” Amnesty International said.

Still, the rights group said, executions in Iran often “were carried out after unfair trials.”

It said Pakistan, Iraq, and Somalia also showed “a significant reduction in the number they carried out,” helping to push down the number of global state executions from at least 993 in 2017 to at least 690 in 2018.

“The dramatic global fall in executions proves that even the most unlikely countries are starting to change their ways and realize the death penalty is not the answer,””Amnesty International Secretary-General Kumi Naidoo said.

Arrest
The trend does not include figures from China,”the world’s leading executioner” where “figures thought to be in their thousands remain classified as a state secret,” Amnesty International said. RFERL

‘World’s Leading Executioner’

The trend does not include figures from China,”the world’s leading executioner” where “figures thought to be in their thousands remain classified as a state secret,” Amnesty International said.

The rights group said it recorded 253 court-ordered executions in Iran, the lowest number there since 2010.

It said 160 of the people executed in Iran — 155 men and five women — were convicted of murder.

Eighteen people executed by authorities in Iran in 2018 were convicted on charges of moharebeh, or “enmity against God,” including six cases related to “political activities.”

Among the “enmity” cases were the executions of ethnic Kurdish prisoners who received “grossly unfair trials” and were “denied access to their lawyers after being arrested” and claiming they had been tortured into making false confessions.

Another 14 people executed in Iran were convicted of “spreading corruption on earth,” the rights group said, noting that some of those cases involved “consensual same-sex sexual conduct.”

It said 28 executions in Iran involved rape cases, 25 were for drug trafficking, and one was for robbery. Five people were executed in Iran on charges that Amnesty could not confirm.

‘Public Hangings’

Unlike previous years, none of the executions in Iran were carried out in public by stoning. But at least 13 executions were public hangings, the report says.

One case it highlighted was the execution of Zeinab Sekaanvand, who reported being a victim of domestic and sexual violence at the age of 17 in West Azerbaijan Province during her “grossly unfair trial” in West Azerbaijan Province.

Amnesty said Sekaanvand was 17 when she was arrested for murdering her husband and had been “tortured by male police officers through beatings all over her body” for 20 days when she “confessed” to stabbing him in 2014.

Zeinab Sekaanvand
Zeinab Sekaanvand. RFERL

She later retracted her confession in court, saying that her husband’s brother had killed him and raped her. But Amnesty said the court failed to investigate her statements and relied, instead, on the “confessions” she had been forced to make under torture.

In Pakistan, Amnesty said, 14 men were known to have been executed by authorities in 2018, including one who was convicted by an antiterrorism court.

That represents a decline of 77 percent compared to 2017 and 86 percent compared to 2016, the report said.

At least four executions were recorded in Belarus in 2018, according to Amnesty International. It said that before two executions in Belarus in 2017, the last time another European country carried out executions was in 2005.

Two people executed in Belarus in 2018 were convicted murderers Alyaksey Mikhalenya and Viktar Liotau, who a fellow death-row inmate said were taken from their cells one night in May “and never returned,” according to the report.

The other two were Ihar Hershaskou and Syamyon Berazhnoy, who it said were executed “without prior notification” in November after being sentenced to death in July 2017 following convictions for murder, kidnapping, and other charges.

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Another 14 people executed in Iran were convicted of “spreading corruption on earth,” the rights group said, noting that some of those cases involved “consensual same-sex sexual conduct.” Pixabay

Amnesty said their cases were unique because the Belarusian Supreme Court took the unprecedented step of reviewing their trials following an appeal that cited alleged procedural violations, but upheld their death sentences in July 2018.

Also Read: Central Asia Sees Feminism Coming Back

Amnesty International also noted that the number of judicial executions in the United States increased from 23 in 2017 to 25 in 2018.

It said 13 of the executions carried out in the United States in 2018 were in the state of Texas. (RFERL)