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Having World at your Fingertips may not be Good! Internet in the classroom is linked to poorer Test Scores: Study

Researchers were able to measure the time spent on non-class related Internet surfing by having them surf using a monitored server

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In this April 18, 2013, photo sophomore Mike Ziehr looks at his computer in the student union at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. VOA
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Dec 16, 2016: Having the world at your fingertips through the Internet was touted as a revolution in education, but a new study suggests Internet in the classroom is linked to poorer test scores.

Writing in the journal Psychological Science, researchers at Michigan State University say the trend of lower test scores was seen even with the “most intelligent and motivated” students.

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For the study, the researchers observed laptop use of 127 students in an introductory psychology class. They found students, on average, spent 37 minutes using their computers for non-related use such as checking email and social media as well as shopping and watching videos.

Researchers were able to measure the time spent on non-class related Internet surfing by having them surf using a monitored server.

During the period of the study, they found 83 students surfed the net in more than half of the 15 classes that made up the course.

What they found was “Internet use was a significant predictor of students’ final exam score.”

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“The detrimental relationship associated with non-academic Internet use,” said Susan Ravizza, associate professor of psychology and lead author of the study, adding that it “raises questions about the policy of encouraging students to bring their laptops to class when they are unnecessary for class use.”

Even when the students used their computers for class-related work, it didn’t help their test scores, researchers said.

“There were no internet-based assignments in this course, which means that most of the ‘academic use’ was downloading lecture slides in order to follow along or take notes,” Ravizza said.

Citing previous studies, Ravizza said taking notes on a laptop is not as effective as taking notes by hand.

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“Once students crack their laptop open, it is probably tempting to do other sorts of internet-based tasks that are not class-relevant,” she said.

She added that she now asks students who bring their computers to her class to sit in the back so as not to distract others. (VOA)

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USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

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Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)