Tuesday October 23, 2018

Higher protein and salt content in our food, Volume Consumed can promote Post-meal Sleep: Study

The sleep period generally lasts around 20 to 40 minutes, with flies that eat larger portions generally sleeping more

0
//
115
Representational image. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

New York, November 22, 2016: Higher protein and salt content in our food, as well as the volume consumed, can lead to longer naps, suggests new research.

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute in the US created a system that can measure both the sleep and feeding behaviours of individual fruit flies and discovered that, in much the same way as humans, the insects sleep for longer periods following larger meals.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Further studies also revealed that certain types of food can promote post-meal sleep.

To better understand this relationship, William Ja and his team created the Activity Recording CAFE (ARC), a system for flies that enables visual tracking of food consumption and insect motion.

Recordings of fruit flies’ behaviour from this system revealed that after eating a meal, the insect sleep more before returning to a normal state of wakefulness.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The sleep period generally lasts around 20 to 40 minutes, with flies that eat larger portions generally sleeping more.

To determine if individual nutrients could modulate post-meal sleep, the team gave the flies food consisting of protein, salt or sugar.

The study, published in the journal eLife, found that only protein and salt were effectors of post-meal sleep, suggesting that this form of sleep can indeed be regulated by specific food types.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

“The ARC provides a starting point for future studies aimed at uncovering the exact genes and circuits that enable meal size, protein and salt to drive sleep,” Ja said.

“As sleep is a vulnerable state for animals in nature, it will be interesting to discover why post-meal naps are necessary,” Ja added. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Salt Not as Damaging to Health as Previously Thought, Says Study

Most previous studies on sodium intake had shown that heart disease and stroke were based on individual-level information

0
Salt
Moderate salt intake not as bad as earlier thought: Study. Pixabay

People with moderate or average salt intake need not reduce their sodium intake for prevention of heart disease and stroke, suggests a new study involving 94,000 people from different parts of the world, including India.

For a vast majority of individuals, sodium consumption does not increase heart risks, except for those who eat more than five grams a day, the equivalent of 2.5 teaspoons of salt, showed the findings published in the journal The Lancet.

Even those who consume a little more than five grams of salt a day, need not worry a lot as the study said that any health risk of sodium intake is virtually eliminated if people improve their diet quality by adding fruits, vegetables, dairy foods, potatoes, and other potassium rich foods.

“The World Health Organization recommends consumption of less than two grams of sodium — that’s one teaspoon of salt — a day as a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease, but there is little evidence in terms of improved health outcomes that individuals ever achieve at such a low level,” said first author of the study Andrew Mente from Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.

Salt
Very low salt intake may be as bad as high levels, international study claims. Pixabay

The researchers followed 94,000 people, aged 35 to 70, for an average of eight years in communities from 18 countries around the world and found there was an associated risk of cardiovascular disease and strokes only where the average intake was greater than five grams of sodium a day.

China is the only country in the study where 80 per cent of communities have a sodium intake of more than five grams a day.

Also Read: Salty Diet Reduces Thirst, Increases Hunger

In the other countries, the majority of the communities had an average sodium consumption of 3 to 5 grams a day (equivalent to 1.5 to 2.5 teaspoons of salt).

Most previous studies on sodium intake had shown that heart disease and stroke were based on individual-level information, said study co-author Martin O’Donnell, Associate Professor at McMaster. (IANS)