Monday February 19, 2018

HIV Infected Smokers More likely to die of lung cancer than AIDS, Reveals Indian-origin Researcher

Smoking kills! A recent research reveals a vicious reality about the people infected with HIV, who loves to smoke, are more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS.

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Cigarette smoking is injurious to health. Pixabay
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New York, September 20, 2017: People living with HIV who adhere to antiretroviral therapy, but smoke tobacco cigarettes are more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS, a study led by an Indian-origin researcher has revealed.

The findings showed that overall people with HIV who take antiviral medicines, but who also smoke are six to 13 times more likely to die from lung cancer than from HIV/AIDS, depending on the intensity of smoking and their sex.

“Smoking and HIV are a particularly bad combination when it comes to lung cancer,” said lead author Krishna Reddy, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

“Lung cancer is now one of the leading killers of people with HIV, but most of these deaths can be prevented,” added Rochelle Walensky, Professor at Harvard Medical School.

Among men who continued to be heavy smokers, an estimated 29 percent would die of lung cancer by age 80, as would 23 per cent of moderate smokers and 19 per cent of light smokers.

For women who continued to be heavy smokers, an estimated 29 percent would die of lung cancer by age 80, as would 21 per cent of moderate smokers and 17 per cent of light smokers.

“The data tell us that now is the time for action: smoking cessation programmes should be integrated into HIV care just like antiviral therapy,” Reddy said in the paper published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

However, among those who managed to quit smoking at age 40, only about six per cent die of lung cancer.

“Quitting smoking is one of the most important things that people with HIV can do to improve their health and live longer,” suggested Travis Baggett, Assistant Professor at the Harvard Medical School.

ALSO READ: Cases of Glaucoma show a rising trend in India, can be caused by Smoking: Doctors

Besides reducing the risk of lung cancer, quitting will also decrease their risk of other diseases such as heart attack, stroke and emphysema, the researchers said. (IANS)

 

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Daily Exercise May Boost Better Lung Function Among Smokers

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries

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According to the researchers, leisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokers. Pixabay
According to the researchers, leisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokers. Pixabay

If you are a smoker try doing regular physical activities as it may help you to have better lung function, a new study suggests.

“This result highlights the importance of physical activity among current smokers specifically, which are a group at higher risk of poor lung function,” said the lead author of the study Elaine Fuertes, a researcher from the Barcelona Institute of Global Health (ISGlobal).

“One possible explanation for this result may be that physical activity improves respiratory muscle endurance and strength via a short or moderate-term effect that requires sustained physical effort to maintain it,” Fuertes added.

ALSO READ: Pollution, the silent killer in metros; 35 per cent children in India have poor lung capacity 

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries. Pixabay
For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries. Pixabay

Over a 10-year period, 3,912 adults (aged between 27 to 57-years-old at the start of the study) were considered as being active if they exercised with a frequency of two or more times a week and a duration of one hour a week or more.

Associations between physical activity and lung function were only apparent among current smokers, suggesting the existence of an inflammation-related biological mechanism, the researchers said.

ALSO READ: Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) May Combat Lung Function Decline in Women: Study

The researchers also found that participants who were active at the end of the study, either by becoming active or remaining active throughout, had significantly higher lung function than those consistently inactive.

“The results of this study strengthen the epidemiological evidence supporting an association between physical activity and respiratory health,” said co-author Judith Garcia-Aymerich, Head of the Non-Communicable Diseases and Environment Programme at ISGlobal.

“This evidence should be used to inform and support public health messages that promote increasing and maintaining physical activity as a way of preserving respiratory health in middle-aged adults,” Garcia-Aymerich noted.