Wednesday July 18, 2018

HIV Infected Smokers More likely to die of lung cancer than AIDS, Reveals Indian-origin Researcher

Smoking kills! A recent research reveals a vicious reality about the people infected with HIV, who loves to smoke, are more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS.

0
//
122
lung cancer
Cigarette smoking is injurious to health. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

New York, September 20, 2017: People living with HIV who adhere to antiretroviral therapy, but smoke tobacco cigarettes are more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS, a study led by an Indian-origin researcher has revealed.

The findings showed that overall people with HIV who take antiviral medicines, but who also smoke are six to 13 times more likely to die from lung cancer than from HIV/AIDS, depending on the intensity of smoking and their sex.

“Smoking and HIV are a particularly bad combination when it comes to lung cancer,” said lead author Krishna Reddy, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

“Lung cancer is now one of the leading killers of people with HIV, but most of these deaths can be prevented,” added Rochelle Walensky, Professor at Harvard Medical School.

Among men who continued to be heavy smokers, an estimated 29 percent would die of lung cancer by age 80, as would 23 per cent of moderate smokers and 19 per cent of light smokers.

For women who continued to be heavy smokers, an estimated 29 percent would die of lung cancer by age 80, as would 21 per cent of moderate smokers and 17 per cent of light smokers.

“The data tell us that now is the time for action: smoking cessation programmes should be integrated into HIV care just like antiviral therapy,” Reddy said in the paper published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

However, among those who managed to quit smoking at age 40, only about six per cent die of lung cancer.

“Quitting smoking is one of the most important things that people with HIV can do to improve their health and live longer,” suggested Travis Baggett, Assistant Professor at the Harvard Medical School.

ALSO READ: Cases of Glaucoma show a rising trend in India, can be caused by Smoking: Doctors

Besides reducing the risk of lung cancer, quitting will also decrease their risk of other diseases such as heart attack, stroke and emphysema, the researchers said. (IANS)

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Smokers Put Their Kids’ Heart in Danger

The study published in the European Heart Journal, however, did not show an effect if only one parent smoked

0
The study shows that exposure to passive smoke in childhood causes a direct and irreversible damage to the structure of the arteries
The study shows that exposure to passive smoke in childhood causes a direct and irreversible damage to the structure of the arteries. Pixabay

Do you smoke when your kids are around? It’s time to change your habits as exposure to passive smoking can increase risks of heart attacks and strokes in your children at later ages, a study said.

The team of researchers from Tasmania, Australia and Finland found that exposure to smoking in childhood thickens arteries’ walls which, in turn, ups the risks of heart attack and stroke.

“The study shows that exposure to passive smoke in childhood causes a direct and irreversible damage to the structure of the arteries,” said Seana Gall, research fellow at the Menzies Research Institute, Tasmania, and University of Tasmania.

The 3,776 children who participated in the research were aged between three and 18 at the start of the studies.

kid
Exposure to smoking in childhood thickens arteries’ walls which, in turn, ups the risks of heart attack and stroke. Pixabay

The researchers asked questions about parents’ smoking habits and they used ultrasound to measure the thickness of the children’s artery walls once they had reached adulthood.
The researchers found that carotid intima-media thickness, a measurement of the thickness of the innermost two layers of the arterial wall, in adulthood was 0.015 mm thicker in those exposed to both parents smoking than in those whose parents did not smoke.

Also Read: Passive Smoking May Spike up Snoring Risk in Kids

The study published in the European Heart Journal, however, did not show an effect if only one parent smoked.

“We think that the effect was only apparent with both parents smoking because of the greater overall dose of smoke these children were exposed to,” said Gall. (IANS)