Monday August 20, 2018
Home Opinion How nature de...

How nature destroys the negative tendencies in a positive manner

0
//
138
Republish
Reprint

tree-338211_640

 

BY ANIL K. RAJVANSHI

There is a beautiful story in Panchtantra. In a huge well lived two groups of frogs who were always fighting for territory and resources of the well. The king of one group who was very intelligent decided to befriend a cobra and get him into the well so that it could finish off the other group. The cobra came into the well and one by one started eating the frogs of the other group. The king was very happy with this development and felt that his aim of controlling the well and its resources was achieved. However soon the cobra ate all the frogs of the other group and turned his attention to the king’s group. The cobra told the frog king that he needs food to survive and so is helpless. Despite king’s pleas and entreaties, the cobra started eating the king’s subjects and family members one by one and ultimately ate the king himself! There is a general tendency in people specially those in power to take the help of negative and evil forces to achieve their goals, little realizing that these forces are nobody’s friends and have their own agenda. They destroy everything in their wake including their creator and cannot be controlled once unleashed. It is therefore best to keep away from them and they should not be played with.

Nature also destroys the negative tendencies but in a very evolutionary and positive manner. The progress or evolution of species takes place by branching. Hence whichever branch gets into a dynamic equilibrium with the surroundings survives, grows and prospers. The other branch, which could not get into equilibrium with the surrounding forces, simply dies off and with it that branch of the species. Thus nature evolves by making the other branch irrelevant. This is a great lesson for all of us. If we want to show somebody down then the best way to do it is to rise higher than that person and make him/her irrelevant. In this process the whole system gets lifted and thus this process is far superior to the one in which the person is brought down using negative forces whereby the whole system looses. This has been taught in all the great religions of the world and is the basis of victory of nonviolence. However to rise up requires great courage, conviction, faith in oneself and internal security.

Sometimes when the evolutionary process goes out of hand and nature cannot solve it by branching, then it removes the species violently as happened in the death of dinosaurs and wiping out of certain species by volcanic events etc. Generally such cataclysmic events are less frequent and the natural process is mostly effected by branching.

How can one make negative or evil forces irrelevant? Patanjali in his Yoga Darshan recommends that one should show indifference to these forces. Thus by not opposing them but by being indifferent to them and acting positively we can make the system evolve so that these forces become irrelevant and die their natural death. Similarly one should not think negatively about others even if they have harmed us because the very act of thinking about a negative person brings his/her negativity to our mind. Thinking deeply is a two way street. We can send thought packets as well as receive them whenever our minds are anchored to the object of perception. In fact the very act of perception means that the information packets from the object of perception will be received. The same applies to thinking about somebody’s mind.

Human beings also have tremendous propensity to humiliate other humans. We seem to get pleasure in bringing others down and in seeing them in misery. This is a general human tendency though this world is also full of examples of great people like Edison, Ford, Faraday etc. who have produced great inventions to remove the misery of humans and make the life of mankind better. Similarly the humanitarian work of Gandhi, Christ, Buddha etc. has also helped mankind. Nevertheless the tendency to create miseries for others could be traced to the evolutionary process whereby to gain control over resources it was necessary to remove the competition and humiliation and pulling down others was a part of this process. However if we realize that by reducing our needs and becoming spiritual we can become better human beings then we do not need to control others and create conditions to fight for the resources. This world can therefore become a much better place if we make ourselves better so that we rise above others and pull the whole system up.

 (The author is the Director and Hon. Secretary Nimbkar Agricultural Research Institute (NARI). He could be reached at  anilrajvanshi@gmail.com)

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Scientists Go Beyond The Laws Of Nature To Unlock Secrets Of Hawaii Volcano

Geologists have died studying active volcanoes

0
Dr. Jessica Ball of USGS, a geologist and volcanologist who does research at the US Geological Survey, is updating Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists on the ground during a helicopter overflight of the ocean entry of the fissure 8 lava flow where a laze (lava haze) plume is visible over the active parts of the flow margin near Kapoho, Hawaii, June 8, 2018.
Dr. Jessica Ball of USGS, a geologist and volcanologist who does research at the US Geological Survey, is updating Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists on the ground during a helicopter overflight of the ocean entry of the fissure 8 lava flow where a laze (lava haze) plume is visible over the active parts of the flow margin near Kapoho, Hawaii, June 8, 2018. VOA

Dressed in heavy cotton, a helmet and respirator, Jessica Ball worked the night shift monitoring “fissure 8,” which has been spewing fountains of lava as high as a 15-story building from a slope on Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano.

The lava poured into a channel oozing toward the Pacific Ocean several miles away. In the eerie orange nightscape in the abandoned community of Leilani Estates, it looked like it was flowing toward the scientist, but that was an optical illusion, Ball said.

“The volcano is doing what it wants to. … We’re reminded what it’s like to deal with the force of nature,” said Ball, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.

Scientists have been in the field measuring the eruptions 24 hours a day, seven days a week since Kilauea first exploded more than two months ago.

They are a mix of USGS staff, University of Hawaii researchers and trained volunteers working six-to-eight-hour shifts in teams of two to five.

They avoid synthetics because they melt in the intense heat and wear gloves to protect their hands from sharp volcanic rock and glass. Helmets protect against falling lava stones, and respirators ward off sulfur gases.

This is not a job for the faint hearted. Geologists have died studying active volcanoes. David Alexander Johnston, a USGS volcanologist was killed by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington state. In 1991,

American volcanologist Harry Glicken and his French colleagues Katia and Maurice Krafft were killed while conducting avalanche research on Mount Unzen in Japan.

Ball, a graduate of the State University of New York at Buffalo, located in upstate New York near the Canadian border, compared Kilauea’s eruptions to Niagara Falls.

“It gives you the same feeling of power and force,” she said.

Worth the risks

Kilauea, which has been erupting almost continuously since 1983, is one of the world’s most closely monitored volcanoes, largely from the now-abandoned Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at the summit. But the latest eruption is one of Kilauea’s biggest and could prove to be a bonanza for scientists.

Ball and the USGS teams are studying how the magma – molten rock from the earth’s crust – tracks through a network of tubes under the volcano in what is known as the “Lower East Rift Zone,” before ripping open ground fissures and spouting fountains of lava.

They are trying to discover what warning signs may exist for future eruptions to better protect the Big Island’s communities, she said.

Fissure 8 is one of 22 around Kilauea that have destroyed over 1,000 structures and forced 2,000 people to evacuate. They are what make this volcanic eruption a rare event, Ball said.

“They’re common for Kilauea on a geologic time scale, but in a human time scale it’s sort of a career event,” she said.

Meanwhile, the summit is erupting almost every day with steam or ash, said Janet Snyder, spokeswoman for the County of Hawaii, where Kilauea is located.

Scientists had thought the steam explosions resulted from lava at the summit dropping down the volcano’s throat into groundwater. This was based on Kilauea’s 1924 eruption, to which the current one is most often compared.

Scientists have been in the field measuring the eruptions 24 hours a day, seven days a week since Kilauea first exploded more than two months ago.
Scientists have been in the field measuring the eruptions 24 hours a day, seven days a week since Kilauea first exploded more than two months ago. Pixabay

But the explosions this time have released lots of sulfur dioxide gas, which means magma is involved, said Michael Poland, scientist-in-charge at Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, one of many volcanologists seconded to Kilauea.

“So we have already made a conceptual leap, leading us to believe it was different from what we had understood,” he said.

Poland and other scientists pulled equipment and archives out of the abandoned observatory at the volcano summit after hundreds of small eruption-induced quakes damaged the structure, and have decamped to the University of Hawaii in Hilo on the Big Island.

The archives included photos, seismic records and samples, some 100 or more years old, Poland said. “These materials are invaluable to someone who says, ‘I have this new idea, and I want to test it using past data.'”

Now the second longest Kilauea eruption on record, surpassed only by one in 1955, this eruption offers far better research opportunities than previous events, Ball said.

Also read: Earthquake Then Volcano, There is No Relief For the Hawaii Residents

“We’ve got much better instruments and we’ve got longer to collect the data,” she said, (VOA)