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HTC Not Quitting Smartphone Business: Report

This comes a month after the company indicated on its Instagram page that it was ready to introduce its Blockchain-powered smartphone Exodus

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HTC
HTC's contract manufacturing operations and VR division were reportedly not affected, Pixabay

Rubbishing previous reports that claimed it was quitting the smartphone business, Taiwanese smartphone maker HTC has said it is working towards releasing new devices by the end of this year and in early 2019, the DigiTimes reported.

The smartphone player has reportedly said that it is contemplating to launch a 6GB RAM and 128GB storage variant of HTC U12 life by the end of December.

“HTC said it will not give up its handset business as it believes that the handset has become indispensable to human life and that the related key VR technology will play a key role for the future development of mobile devices,” the report said on Thursday.

HTC
Representational image.

“In addition to continuing optimizing its VR platform and enriching its VR/AR content, HTC said it will also exert efforts to integrate related technologies including AI, blockchain and 5G to roll out new product lines for the 5G era.”

This comes a month after the company indicated on its Instagram page that it was ready to introduce its Blockchain-powered smartphone Exodus.

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The HTC Exodus is the brainchild of HTC Vive Founder, Phil Chen, who was also the driving force behind the Vive virtual reality (VR) headset and forms the start of a major Blockchain push as the company looks to return to the smartphone industry. (IANS)

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Usage of Smartphones for Eye Check-up May Lead to Misdiagnosis

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised - with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent

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Using smartphones to capture photographs of patients’ eyes for check-up may lead to misdiagnosis as camera colour sensors vary and as a result, images of the same eye may appear different depending on the model of smartphone used, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests that calibration of phone cameras is vital to capture accurate data.

Eye examinations to look for redness in the eye can indicate a variety of conditions including conjunctivitis, dry-eye disease and tear-gland dysfunction.

Clinicians increasingly use smartphones in conjunction with ophthalmic imaging equipment, such as the eyepiece of a slit lamp, because of their portability, ease of use and relatively low cost.

The connectivity also allows for upload to the Cloud, which is useful for telemedicine – the remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology – and Artificial Intelligence applications that store thousands of images from different institutions.

However, the autofocus algorithms and hardware specifications of cameras may be different for different manufacturers which means different cameras can produce different results for the same scene.

Switching mice destined to develop glaucoma to a low carbohydrate, high fat diet protects the cells of the retina and their connections to the brain from degeneration.
Low carb diet can maintain eyesight. Pixabay

“It is important that clinicians bear this in mind,” said lead study author Carles Otero from Anglia Ruskin University in England.

For the study, the researchers took 192 images of eyes using three smartphone cameras, two different lighting levels and two zoom levels.

The images were duplicated and one set was white balanced and colour corrected (calibrated) and the other left unaltered.

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The researchers took photographs in autofocus mode with the iPhone 6s, the Google Nexus 6p and the Bq Aquaris U Lite, and found that the iPhone results were significantly different from the other two devices, when computing relative redness of each eye, and when compared to a clinician’s diagnosis.

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised – with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent.

“Our results show that while the clinician’s subjective evaluation was not affected by different cameras, lighting conditions or optical magnifications, calibration of a smartphone’s camera is essential when extracting objective data from images,” Otero said. (IANS)