Monday April 22, 2019
Home Lead Story Huawei May Co...

Huawei May Consider Selling 5G Technology to Apple

However, it is also worth noting that the US considers Huawei a security threat because of its close link with the Chinese government

0
//
5G
FILE - The logos of Huawei are displayed at it retail shop window reflecting the Ministry of Foreign Affairs office in Beijing, Jan. 29, 2019. VOA

Chinese smartphone-maker Huawei could be considering selling its high powered 5G-enabled modems and chipsets to Apple, according to media reports.

“A source with knowledge of the situation has confirmed that Huawei is now ‘open’ to selling its ‘5G Balong 5000’ chipsets, but only to Apple,” Engadget reported on Monday.

So far, the company has refrained from selling the advanced processors and modems it uses on its mobile portfolio to other competitors.

Launched in January, Huawei’s modem “5G Balong 5000” was introduced as the world’s most powerful 5G modem and the first that fully supports both, Non-Standalone (NSA) and Standalone (SA) 5G network architectures.

“Huawei’s surprising change of heart only really matters because Apple appears to be in a tough spot with its sole modem supplier, Intel. The chipmaker currently provides the wireless modems that go into all current iPhones and iPads and it said late last year that its 5G-ready ‘XMM 8160’ modems would be available for its customers in the second half of 2019,” the report said.

However, citing an an anonymous source, recent media reports claimed that Apple has “lost confidence” in Intel after the chipmaker failed to meet certain development deadlines.

huawei
FILE – A staff member stands in front of a Huawei shop in Beijing, China, March 7, 2019. VOA

Besides, Apple’s ongoing legal battles with US-based chip-maker Qualcomm also gives Huawei the edge to sell its technologies to the iPhone-maker without having to face tough competition.

However, it is also worth noting that the US considers Huawei a security threat because of its close link with the Chinese government.

Not only has the US government banned their federal agencies from using Huawei products, but it has also been encouraging other countries to refrain from using Huawei’s technology with their 5G networks.

Also Read- Sir Ganga Ram Doctors Remove ‘Largest Ureteric Stone’ with the Help of Da Vinci Robot

But the “Balong 5000” seems like the kind of chip Apple would need. It supports both sub-6 and mmWave 5G networks, and is backward compatible with 2G, 3G and 4G LTE networks.

This would give Apple the ability to build an iPhone that would support 5G networks built off of existing 4G infrastructure, as well as the “standalone” 5G networks that will follow, the report added.

As explained by the company earlier, the Balong chipset, which is currently for Huawei’s internal use only, is mainly intended to support Huawei’s smart products, such as Internet of Things (IoT) products and phones including Huawei’s “Mate 20X” and foldable “Mate X” smartphones. (IANS)

Next Story

Swatch Defeats Apple in Legal War Over Catch-phrase

In 2007, Swatch trademarked the term “iSwatch” before Apple could register for “iWatch.”

0
Apple, women
The Apple logo is shown outside the company's Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, California. VOA

Swiss watchmaker Swatch defeated Apple in a legal battle where the iPhone-maker claimed that the watch company used the phrase “One More Thing” — which was regularly used by Steve Jobs in his key notes.

While launching a “film noir inspired” set of watches in Australia, Swatch did use the phrase but it said the line was picked up from an old detective TV serial “Columbo” in which the character often said “just one more thing”, 9To5Mac reported on Saturday.

Drian Richards, the hearing officer of the case, sided with Swatch and ordered Apple to pay the watchmaker’s legal fees.

He noted that Apple had never used the “One More Thing” phrase in conjunction with any “particular” goods or services.

How much will Apple have to pay back to Swatch remains undisclosed as of now.

Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

In August, 2015 Swatch had trademarked the expression “One More Thing”.

However, Apple believed that watch-maker should not be allowed to use that trademark over the phrase and instead applied for its own trademark.

This latest ruling in Australia comes after Apple lost a similar legal battle with Swatch in Switzerland earlier in April where the watchmaker used the phrase “Tick Different” while promoting its new NFC-enabled watch.

Also Read- YouTube Music Now Streaming Free on Smart Speakers

Apple argued that the phrase unfairly traded on its “Think Different” slogan it used in the 1990s but the Swiss court sided by Swatch on the issue.

In 2007, Swatch trademarked the term “iSwatch” before Apple could register for “iWatch.” (IANS)