Saturday November 16, 2019

Human Bones Found near Former Nazi Research Site in Berlin where dead camp victim’s body parts were sent by SS doctor Josef Mengele

The site is about 100 meters (yards) away from what was the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Human Heredity and Eugenics in the Nazi era

0
//
FILE - Federal police agent holds two photos and the identity card June 7, 1985 found in the house in which the man believed to be Nazi War Criminal Josef Mengele lived. Photo on left shows Mengele eating. Image source: VOA

Archaeologists in Berlin have unearthed a large number of human bones from a site close to where Nazi scientists carried out research on body parts of death camp victims sent to them by sadistic SS doctor Josef Mengele, officials said Thursday.

Experts have been examining the site in Berlin’s upscale Dahlem neighborhood since a small number of bones were found there in 2014 during road work on a property belonging to Berlin’s Free University.

In the dig they uncovered “numerous fractured skulls, teeth, vertebrae” and other bones, including those of children, Susan Pollock, a professor of archaeology at the university who was one of the leaders of the team, said in a statement.

The bones found in 2014 were never identified, and the new discovery provides researchers “a new possibility to illuminate the unusual find and the circumstances under which they were buried,” said Joerg Haspel, the leader of Berlin’s office that oversees memorial sites.

Trump to make quick trip to Mexico before immigration speech Europe’s refugee crisis simmers despite efforts to solve it

Several of the vertebrae found had traces of glue on them, indicating they may have been parts of skeletons on display.

German police shooting women and children from the Mizocz Ghetto, 14 October 1942. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
German police shooting women and children from the Mizocz Ghetto, 14 October 1942. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

The site is about 100 meters (yards) away from what was the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Human Heredity and Eugenics in the Nazi era.

The world-famous Kaiser Wilhelm Society predated the Nazi era and once counted famous scientists like Albert Einstein among its directors.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

During the Nazi dictatorship, however, the Dahlem institute was closely associated with pseudoscientific race research, and notorious Auschwitz physician Mengele as well as others are known to have sent many body parts there for study. It was also known to have a collection of bones from Germany’s colonial era, among others.

Experts now plan to use osteological identification methods to try to learn more about the newly discovered bones, and should at least be able to determine the general age of the person, their sex and how many different people’s bones were found, Pollock said. Results are expected at the earliest at the end of the year.

A working group of the university, the city, and the Max Planck Society, which the Kaiser Wilhelm Society was renamed after the war, has been keeping in close contact with Germany’s Central Council of Jews and Central Council of Sinti and Roma on the archaeological work.

Earlier this year, the Max Planck Society ordered a complete review of its specimens collection after discovering human brain sections in its archive that were from victims of Nazi Germany’s so-called euthanasia program in which psychiatric patients and people with mental deficiencies were killed.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

“The Max Planck Society has accepted a difficult legacy of its predecessor organization, the Kaiser Wilhelm Society,” said society president Martin Stratmann of his organization’s participation in the ongoing archaeological investigation. “We are well aware of the special responsibility that it entails.” (VOA)

Next Story

Mexico Mammoths: Human-Built Woolly Mammoth Traps Found in Tultepec

Researchers speculated that ancient hunters probably chased the giant animals into the pits, which are 1.70 meters deep and 25 meters in diameter

0
Mexico, Mammoths, Human
In this undated photo released by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, mammoth bones lie at an excavation site in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City. VOA

Anthropologists have found skeletons of at least 14 woolly mammoths that died after falling into traps built by humans 15,000 years ago.

The two pits were found in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City, Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said this week.

Researchers speculated that ancient hunters probably chased the giant animals into the pits, which are 1.70 meters deep and 25 meters in diameter (5½ feet by 82 feet).

There was some evidence that some of the mammals had been butchered.

Mexico, Mammoths, Human
The two pits were found in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City, Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said this week. Pixabay

Luis Cordoba, the head of the excavation team, said the discovery was key in studying the relationship between prehistoric hunting and gathering communities and the huge herbivores.

“There was little evidence before that hunters attacked mammoths. It was thought they frightened them into getting stuck in swamps and then waited for them to die,” he told reporters. “This is evidence of direct attacks on mammoths. In Tultepec we can see there was the intention to hunt and make use of the mammoths.”

Also Read- Apple Leads With 48% Share in the Smartwatch Market

The pits were found when crews were digging in the area to build a garbage dump.  (VOA)