Tuesday November 13, 2018

Human Bones Found near Former Nazi Research Site in Berlin where dead camp victim’s body parts were sent by SS doctor Josef Mengele

The site is about 100 meters (yards) away from what was the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Human Heredity and Eugenics in the Nazi era

0
//
FILE - Federal police agent holds two photos and the identity card June 7, 1985 found in the house in which the man believed to be Nazi War Criminal Josef Mengele lived. Photo on left shows Mengele eating. Image source: VOA
Republish
Reprint

Archaeologists in Berlin have unearthed a large number of human bones from a site close to where Nazi scientists carried out research on body parts of death camp victims sent to them by sadistic SS doctor Josef Mengele, officials said Thursday.

Experts have been examining the site in Berlin’s upscale Dahlem neighborhood since a small number of bones were found there in 2014 during road work on a property belonging to Berlin’s Free University.

In the dig they uncovered “numerous fractured skulls, teeth, vertebrae” and other bones, including those of children, Susan Pollock, a professor of archaeology at the university who was one of the leaders of the team, said in a statement.

The bones found in 2014 were never identified, and the new discovery provides researchers “a new possibility to illuminate the unusual find and the circumstances under which they were buried,” said Joerg Haspel, the leader of Berlin’s office that oversees memorial sites.

Trump to make quick trip to Mexico before immigration speech Europe’s refugee crisis simmers despite efforts to solve it

Several of the vertebrae found had traces of glue on them, indicating they may have been parts of skeletons on display.

German police shooting women and children from the Mizocz Ghetto, 14 October 1942. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
German police shooting women and children from the Mizocz Ghetto, 14 October 1942. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

The site is about 100 meters (yards) away from what was the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Human Heredity and Eugenics in the Nazi era.

The world-famous Kaiser Wilhelm Society predated the Nazi era and once counted famous scientists like Albert Einstein among its directors.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

During the Nazi dictatorship, however, the Dahlem institute was closely associated with pseudoscientific race research, and notorious Auschwitz physician Mengele as well as others are known to have sent many body parts there for study. It was also known to have a collection of bones from Germany’s colonial era, among others.

Experts now plan to use osteological identification methods to try to learn more about the newly discovered bones, and should at least be able to determine the general age of the person, their sex and how many different people’s bones were found, Pollock said. Results are expected at the earliest at the end of the year.

A working group of the university, the city, and the Max Planck Society, which the Kaiser Wilhelm Society was renamed after the war, has been keeping in close contact with Germany’s Central Council of Jews and Central Council of Sinti and Roma on the archaeological work.

Earlier this year, the Max Planck Society ordered a complete review of its specimens collection after discovering human brain sections in its archive that were from victims of Nazi Germany’s so-called euthanasia program in which psychiatric patients and people with mental deficiencies were killed.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

“The Max Planck Society has accepted a difficult legacy of its predecessor organization, the Kaiser Wilhelm Society,” said society president Martin Stratmann of his organization’s participation in the ongoing archaeological investigation. “We are well aware of the special responsibility that it entails.” (VOA)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Largely Opposed Office Plan In Berlin Abandoned By Google

Kreuzberg, which straddled the Berlin Wall that divided East and West Berlin during the Cold War, has traditionally been a bastion of the city's underground and radical culture.

0
Google, cryptocurrency, Doodle 4 google
A Google logo is seen at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California, VOA

Campaigners in a bohemian district of Berlin celebrated Wednesday after Internet giant Google abandoned strongly-opposed plans to open a large campus there.

The US firm had planned to set up an incubator for start-up companies in Kreuzberg, one of the older districts in the west of the capital.

But the company’s German spokesman Ralf Bremer announced Wednesday that the 3,000 square-metre (3,590 square-yard) space — planned to host offices, cafes and communal work areas, would instead go to two local humanitarian associations.

Google, Doodle 4 google
A Google logo is displayed at the entrance to the internet based company’s offices in Toronto. VOA

Bremer did not say if local resistance to the plans over the past two years had played a part in the change of heart, although he had told the Berliner Zeitung daily that Google does not allow protests dictate its actions.

“The struggle pays off,” tweeted “GloReiche Nachbarschaft”, one of the groups opposed to the Kreuzberg campus plan and part of the “F**k off Google” campaign.

Some campaigners objected to what they described as Google’s “evil” corporate practices, such as tax evasion and the unethical use of personal data.

Some opposed the gentrification of the district, pricing too many people out of the area.

Google
Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during a news conference in New Delhi. VOA

A recent study carried out by the Knight Fox consultancy concluded that property prices are rising faster in Berlin than anywhere else in the world: they jumped 20.5 percent between 2016 and 2017.

Also Read: Indian Embassy Organised A Second Diaspora Event In Berlin

In Kreuzberg over the same period, the rise was an astonishing 71 percent.

Kreuzberg, which straddled the Berlin Wall that divided East and West Berlin during the Cold War, has traditionally been a bastion of the city’s underground and radical culture. (VOA)