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If you Believe these 10 Things about North-East Indians, You are a Racist!

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A woman from north-eastern India, Pixabay
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New Delhi, May 5, 2017:  Many people hailing from Northeast are being asked weird questions like, “Do you guys eat Dog Meat”, “Are you from China?”, etc. The amalgamation of stereotypes and racism is consequent in making the ‘Indian’ citizens hailing from the Northeastern part of India alienated.

10 girls from Northeast India recall racial slurs or supposedly ‘jokes’ that they encountered in ‘mainland’ India. The ordeal with racism is paltry amount of shame is associated with it. If you are at the receiving end of a racist attack, you are told by people around you to laugh it off because, ‘joke hai yaar‘.
These racial remarks and slurs are masqueraded as ‘curiosity’ or ‘jokes’. In an article published by Huffington Post, we get to know the plight of North-east Girls in India and what they deal with for who they are-

1. Trisha Bhuyan, 27, Assam: Once I was interning with a reputed newspaper around 5 years back. The other intern and I were having a generic conversation, when I told her that I did my schooling in Assam. She said, “Assam?…er…there are schools there? Isn’t it all jhopar pattis?”

Tribals of North-east India (representational Image): Twitter
2. Priyanjana Roy Das, 25, Assam: When a I was in Bangalore, a very perplexed friend asked if Guwahati was in Kerala, upon hearing that I am from that. But leave that, once I have been asked if a passport is required to go to the Northeast. Till this day, I hope that she was actually talking about a permit and not a passport.

3. Precious Kamei, 30, Manipur: I am a Naga, from Manipur so I have been subjected to a lot of ignorant remarks. I still get asked, “Have you ever tried human meat?” I mean why, just because I am a Naga? “Ise gussa mat dila, sab kuch khati hain…insaan ko bhi khati hain” (don’t make her angry, she eats everything…even humans) — this was supposed to be a joke. Our ancestors might have been head hunters, but mixing this up with cannibalism is just plain ignorant and stereotypical. I grew up knowing that I am an Indian. It was only after coming to Delhi that I was made aware that I am a Northeastern.

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4. Abhilasha M*, 28, Meghalaya: I am an Assamese who have been brought up in Shillong. Although my Hindi has always been a butt of jokes, it is my looks that catches everyone’s attention. “But you don’t look Northeastern,” I have been told over and over again, even a couple of days ago.

5. Richivandana Gogoi, 27, Assam: I was at my gym a couple of days ago, when the instructor decided to talk to me. “Aap kahaan se ho? Northeast? West Bengal? Kyunki aapke face se pata nahin chal raha,” he stated. (Where are you from? Northeast? West Bengal? Because I can’t make out from your face) I answered I am from Assam. He then spoke that I don’t look like I am from Northeast because apparently Northeastern people are supposed to be fair and I am dusky. He also spoke that the Northeast is a very perilous place, which is why he has never went there.

North-east women performing a folk dance (Representational Image): Twitter

6. Annie L, 33, Nagaland: This was last year in Bengaluru. I was mansplained that Northeast was inherently wild, until someone civilised came and turned it better. What does that even mean?

7. Richa Barman, 39, Assam: This was during my college days, so it has been a while. I was asked if I was a member of the extremist outfit, ULFA or if any of my relatives were.

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8. R. Konyak*, 30, Nagaland: Once a college friend asked me if my house in Nagaland is made of bamboos. I was patient and replied that we don’t live in tree houses. She took a couple of minutes to take this new bit of information in and spoke, “But I thought you all live in bamboo houses.”

9. E. Kharraswai*, 33, Meghalaya: I don’t think people from the “mainland” can distinguish between a Manipuri or a Naga or a Mizo. They believe that all the tribes are all Nagas. So, naturally, there have been a number of times I have heard ignorant stuff but there is this incident that I thought was the epitome of all things ignorant. A junior from college and I shared a rickshaw to college, when she asked me where I was from. I said Meghalaya. She replied, “Oh, that is in which state?”

10. N. Tzudir, 20, Nagaland: When I moved to Delhi for my undergraduate programme, in my first week at my hostel a girl said, “Oh you are from Nagaland? I thought you are from India”. When I gave her a piece of my mind, she clarified, “I meant from Delhi, Punjab, MP, you know.”

– prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

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British Columbia Looking For Skilled Indian to Join Tech Related Jobs

"India would be a very crucial market for us. There are many international immigrants including Indians in Vancouver".

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British Columbia, the Canadian province that is a leader in technology and has one of the fastest growing tech ecosystems in the world
British Columbian Flag.Wikimedia commons

British Columbia, the Canadian province that is a leader in technology and has one of the fastest growing tech ecosystems in the world, is looking at a shortfall of 30,000 skilled individuals to fill tech-related jobs, with India as an important catchment area for recruiting immigrant talent.

“India, the Philippines and Nigeria are the countries we are looking for tapping talent in the Information Technology (IT) sector,” says Patrick Mackenzie, CEO of the Immigrant Employment Council (IEC) of British Columbia, the southwestern province in Canada which accounts for more than 10,000 companies and approximately $29 billion (Canadian dollars) in revenue.

Speaking to IANS on the sidelines of the third annual BCTECH Summit here, Mackenzie said there are huge openings for immigrants as information system analysts, consultants, software engineers and designers and computer system managers.

“The current supply cannot meet the industry’s growing demands for tech talent. By 2021, there will be an anticipated shortfall of over 30,000 skilled individuals to fill tech-related jobs in the province,” he noted.

Unless immediate action was taken by the provincial and federal governments, tech employers, the settlement and integration sector and other key shareholders, this employment gap will severely limit the potential growth of the industry, Mackenzie added.

The “2016 Tech Talent BC Report” identifies three talent pools — new entrants or recent graduates, immigrants and other local supply to include career transitioners and people from under-represented groups.

The focus of the report was immigrants and the country needs to source 8,500 more immigrants than are currently projected to arrive in BC by 2021 to meet the growing tech sector demand.

British Columbia’s Premier John Horgan, in his remarks at the plenary session on Wednesday, put the figure at 9,600 which the province needs to bring people from across the world into the tech sector.

British Columbia, the Canadian province that is a leader in technology and has one of the fastest growing tech ecosystems in the world
British Columbia is willing to hire numerous skilled personnel for their technical industry. Pexels

The tech and innovation sector in BC has grown rapidly over the past 10 years, transforming its economy in many ways that people could not have imagined. It is evident in the increase of technology jobs from 66,000 in 2002 to more than one lakh in 2016.

Bruce Ralston, Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology, British Columbia, said the province is home to globally-recognised talent, trained at international renowned post-secondary institutions and some of the most successful and innovative companies in the industry.

Ralston said the government of British Columbia actively supported the tech sector to build the good, highly-skilled jobs of tomorrow and to keep their traditional sectors stay efficient, sustainable and globally competitive.

“However, we know the government cannot grow the tech sector alone, and we need strong partnerships –within the private sector, with other levels of government, with educators, and between our traditional industries and innovative tech companies- to continue to develop the emerging economy,” he added.

Mackenzie says even this year, despite the high number of openings, actually over 3,600 jobs will get unfilled till 2020-21 if we don’t find ways to fill them. “We need 8,500 immigrants with skills,” he added.

Asked about the emphasis the IEC would have on India as a pool for scouting talent, he said: “India is a leader in the tech sector and the Council has a very clear picture how to rope in talent and to tell the immigrants what they can look for and do in Canada”.

“India would be a very crucial market for us. There are many international immigrants including Indians in Vancouver”.

It is not just tech jobs and there are openings everywhere, the IEC CEO stressed.

One of the key findings of the IEC report on “Employer Challenges in Attracting and Integrating Immigrant Talent into BC’s Tech Sector” was that most employers had used at least one of the programmes to source international talent and had mixed reviews.

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The other was the alignment between immigrant talent and tech employer needs as they relate to soft skills (language) and hard skills (technical).

With a few exceptions, most employers felt that immigrants’ soft skills were in short supply and, in particular, their interpersonal communication styles often do not align with Canadian employers’ expectations.

The final theme of the report involved settlement and integration services and support for newcomers and their families.

British Columbia is home to international tech giants like Microsoft, Google and others.