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If you Believe these 10 Things about North-East Indians, You are a Racist!

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A woman from north-eastern India, Pixabay

New Delhi, May 5, 2017:  Many people hailing from Northeast are being asked weird questions like, “Do you guys eat Dog Meat”, “Are you from China?”, etc. The amalgamation of stereotypes and racism is consequent in making the ‘Indian’ citizens hailing from the Northeastern part of India alienated.

10 girls from Northeast India recall racial slurs or supposedly ‘jokes’ that they encountered in ‘mainland’ India. The ordeal with racism is paltry amount of shame is associated with it. If you are at the receiving end of a racist attack, you are told by people around you to laugh it off because, ‘joke hai yaar‘.
These racial remarks and slurs are masqueraded as ‘curiosity’ or ‘jokes’. In an article published by Huffington Post, we get to know the plight of North-east Girls in India and what they deal with for who they are-

1. Trisha Bhuyan, 27, Assam: Once I was interning with a reputed newspaper around 5 years back. The other intern and I were having a generic conversation, when I told her that I did my schooling in Assam. She said, “Assam?…er…there are schools there? Isn’t it all jhopar pattis?”

Tribals of North-east India (representational Image): Twitter
2. Priyanjana Roy Das, 25, Assam: When a I was in Bangalore, a very perplexed friend asked if Guwahati was in Kerala, upon hearing that I am from that. But leave that, once I have been asked if a passport is required to go to the Northeast. Till this day, I hope that she was actually talking about a permit and not a passport.

3. Precious Kamei, 30, Manipur: I am a Naga, from Manipur so I have been subjected to a lot of ignorant remarks. I still get asked, “Have you ever tried human meat?” I mean why, just because I am a Naga? “Ise gussa mat dila, sab kuch khati hain…insaan ko bhi khati hain” (don’t make her angry, she eats everything…even humans) — this was supposed to be a joke. Our ancestors might have been head hunters, but mixing this up with cannibalism is just plain ignorant and stereotypical. I grew up knowing that I am an Indian. It was only after coming to Delhi that I was made aware that I am a Northeastern.

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4. Abhilasha M*, 28, Meghalaya: I am an Assamese who have been brought up in Shillong. Although my Hindi has always been a butt of jokes, it is my looks that catches everyone’s attention. “But you don’t look Northeastern,” I have been told over and over again, even a couple of days ago.

5. Richivandana Gogoi, 27, Assam: I was at my gym a couple of days ago, when the instructor decided to talk to me. “Aap kahaan se ho? Northeast? West Bengal? Kyunki aapke face se pata nahin chal raha,” he stated. (Where are you from? Northeast? West Bengal? Because I can’t make out from your face) I answered I am from Assam. He then spoke that I don’t look like I am from Northeast because apparently Northeastern people are supposed to be fair and I am dusky. He also spoke that the Northeast is a very perilous place, which is why he has never went there.

North-east women performing a folk dance (Representational Image): Twitter

6. Annie L, 33, Nagaland: This was last year in Bengaluru. I was mansplained that Northeast was inherently wild, until someone civilised came and turned it better. What does that even mean?

7. Richa Barman, 39, Assam: This was during my college days, so it has been a while. I was asked if I was a member of the extremist outfit, ULFA or if any of my relatives were.

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8. R. Konyak*, 30, Nagaland: Once a college friend asked me if my house in Nagaland is made of bamboos. I was patient and replied that we don’t live in tree houses. She took a couple of minutes to take this new bit of information in and spoke, “But I thought you all live in bamboo houses.”

9. E. Kharraswai*, 33, Meghalaya: I don’t think people from the “mainland” can distinguish between a Manipuri or a Naga or a Mizo. They believe that all the tribes are all Nagas. So, naturally, there have been a number of times I have heard ignorant stuff but there is this incident that I thought was the epitome of all things ignorant. A junior from college and I shared a rickshaw to college, when she asked me where I was from. I said Meghalaya. She replied, “Oh, that is in which state?”

10. N. Tzudir, 20, Nagaland: When I moved to Delhi for my undergraduate programme, in my first week at my hostel a girl said, “Oh you are from Nagaland? I thought you are from India”. When I gave her a piece of my mind, she clarified, “I meant from Delhi, Punjab, MP, you know.”

– prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

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The Best Destinations for a Perfect Travel Experience

Here are some offbeat Indian destinations for backpackers

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Travel destinations
For millennials, travel is not just a means of escaping a busy lifestyle, but an end in itself. Pixabay

Millennials are seekers of wholesome experiences. For them, travel is not just a means of escaping a busy lifestyle, but an end in itself. It’s an essential part of life, not a break away from it.

In sync with the new taste and preferences of young adventure-seekers, the following places are rising up to the occasion by enhancing their travel experiences:

Wayanad- travel
Wayanad is the perfect travel destination for nature-lovers. Pixabay

Aurangabad
An exquisite confluence of history and culture, Aurangabad is home to the renowned Ajanta and Ellora Caves, a lot of old forts, art galleries, and museums. Besides this, the place is a bubbling, simmering pot of a range of dishes that no food-lover can afford to miss.

Mukteshwar
What could be better than mountains and peace? Mukteshwar is the stuff that a nature lover’s dreams are made of. It is the perfect place to chill alongside Nature within the folds of mighty mountains while enjoying the soul-soothing embrace of sunlight and the skin-tingling kiss of wintry waft. Mukteshwar is less than an eight-hour drive from Delhi, making it one of the closest hill stations to the Capital.

Wayanad
Wayanad is another treat for nature-lovers who also seek unique cultural experiences. Situated at a distance of 76 kilometers from the beaches of Kozhikode, the region is popular among backpackers on account of its near-perfect weather and scenic setting punctuated with dams, lakes, and hike trails. The town paints a quaint and soothing picture with the lush green of mountainous plateaus, picturesque jungles, and idyllic valleys dominating. Squatting atop the Western Ghats and enclosing part of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, Wayanad is not considered the most beautiful district in Kerala in vain.

Alleppey- travel
Alleppey is a famous travel destination known for its backwaters and houseboats. Pixabay

Pokhara
Pokhara is often called the tourism capital of Nepal – and it is not in vain that it has received this moniker. It serves as a gateway to the renowned Annapurna Circuit, is among the most exciting paragliding destinations the world over, and offers the entrancing sight of the beautiful lake framed by sky-piercing mountains. What crystallizes its reputation as the ultimate ‘Adventure Land of Nepal’ is that it cuts a less busy version of Kathmandu while holding on its own as a must-visit backpacker’s paradise.

Also Read- Marine Animals Can Help Humans Monitor Oceans: Study

Alleppey
It is only when one has explored the intricate network of waterways which can only have been knitted by Mother Chaos that one realizes that the tag ‘Venice of the East’ does Alleppey injustice. Perpetually carrying the fascinating look of a forest having just emerged from a spell of rain, the region is famous for its toddy shops, punted boats, coir industry, paddy fields, the floating villages, and houseboats! (IANS)