Monday December 10, 2018
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Ignorance is bliss? Not really

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New Delhi: A Sikh Gurdwara in Buena Park, Los Angeles was vandalized on Sunday with hateful graffiti against the ISIS which appears to be a case of mistaken identity. The parking lot of the Gurdwara and the temple was sprayed with anti-ISIS and anti-Islam remarks.

Sikhs in the western world have been the victim of several hate crimes because of the ignorance prevailing among the locals about the origin of the Sikhism. The similarity in the appearance as Sikh also keep long beards is a reason for the mistaken identity.

In September, a Sikh man was beaten and called Osama Bin Laden because of his appearance.

The Sikh community was asked to take extra caution in the wake of California shooting. It was said that hate crimes were expected to take place and Sikhs might be the wrong victims of this unjustified revenge.

Recently, Donald Trump with his venomous speeches sparked a fire in those ignorant minds who have a stereotypical fear about Islam.

This highlights two problems. First, how can a hate crime be justified? Even if a psychopathic couple shot 14 people dead, does that make the whole religion and its followers terrorists?

The second problem which is at the core of it is the ignorance. It is quite appalling how ignorant can people be. Imagine this scenario that you see a person and by the physical appearance of him, you come to a conclusion whether he is a danger or not. The height of ignorance is putting a tag on people who just happen to look like the ones you hate.

It’s like what Americans say about the difference between a Chinese and Japanese, ‘Same noodles, different sauce’.

It is a shame that a country that first achieved the freedom and a right to build a modern nation forgetting all the past baggage has turned into a nation which has created stereotypes about the rest of the world in its society that claims to be all inclusive and boasts of being a ‘melting pot’.

Indians and middle eastern people are same… all of the east Asians are same.

The struggle of 1776 was not to make the America that it has become. Nobody can deny this that the whole world appreciated how America was built from zero, how they have developed. People might criticize their means, but one has to praise the life standard they have created.

Noam Chomsky lives in the US and criticizes it. Soviet Russia collapsed because it did not allow the criticism of the state.

However, it appears that the fear has so much got into the minds of Americans that the country is no more same.

What the US is doing in Syria is hard to understand. They are against ISIS who are against Assad regime and the US is against Assad too and then Russia is bombing against IS also, but the US does not like Russia doing it. This whole sentence did not make any sense because what the US is doing does not make any sense.

How about informing people so that ignorance can be done away with? It makes more sense than bombing which is taking the lives.

Maybe Americans need Thomas Gray to come himself and say that this wasn’t the ignorance he thought to be bliss. Ask the innocent victims, for this is only creating hatred.

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Online Hate Thriving Even After The Recent Hate Crime In The U.S.

The commitment to eradicating hate from platforms is not always matched by the ability to do so because there is just so much content out there.

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Pittsburgh, Hate, shooting
Flowers surround signs on Oct. 31, 2018, part of a makeshift memorial outside the Tree of Life synagogue to the 11 people killed during worship services. VOA

A website popular with racists that was used by the man charged in the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre was shut down within hours of the slaughter, but it hardly mattered: Anti-Semites and racists who hang out in such havens just moved to other online forums.

On Wednesday, four days after 11 people were fatally shot in the deadliest attack on Jews in U.S. history, anonymous posters on another website popular with white supremacists, Stormfront, claimed the bloodshed at Tree of Life synagogue was an elaborate fake staged by actors. The site’s operator, a former Ku Klux Klan leader, said traffic has increased about 45 percent since the shooting.

The anti-Semitic rhetoric was just as bad on another site popular with white supremacists, The Daily Stormer, where a headline said: “Just go, Jews. You’re not welcome.”

Trying to stop the online vitriol that opponents say fuels real-world bloodshed is a constant battle for groups that monitor hate, and victories are hard to come by. Shut down one platform like Gab, where the shooting suspect posted a message shortly before the attack, and another one remains or a new one opens.

pittsburgh shooting, Hate
Flowers surround Stars of David on Oct. 31, 2018, part of a makeshift memorial outside the Tree of Life Synagogue to the 11 people killed during worship services Saturday in Pittsburgh., VOA

The problem dates back to the dawn of the internet, when users connected their computers to each other by dialing telephone numbers. A report issued by the New York-based Anti-Defamation League in 1985 found there were two online “networks of hate” in the United States, both run by neo-Nazis who spread anti-Semitic, racist propaganda.

Today, the vastness of the online world is a big part of the problem, said Oren Segal, director of the ADL’s Center for Extremism. Determining how many hate sites exist is nearly impossible, he said.

“It’s really difficult to put an actual number on it, but I would say this: There are thousands of hate sites and there are dozens and dozens of platforms in which hate exists,” Segal said.

A new study by the VOX-Pol Network of Excellence, composed of academic researchers who study online extremism, said the exact number of far-right adherents on just one platform, Twitter, is impossible to determine. But at least 100,000 people and automated accounts are aligned with radicals commonly referred to as the “alt-right,” the study found, and the true number is probably more than twice that.

pittsburgh shooting, Hate
A sign during a protest gathering on the block of the Jewish Community Center in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, where the funeral for Dr. Jerry Rabinowitz. VOA

An ADL report released a day before the shooting said extremists had increased anti-Semitic harassment against Jewish journalists, political candidates and others ahead of the midterm elections. Researchers who analyzed more than 7.5 million Twitter messages from Aug. 31 to Sept. 17 found almost 30 percent of the accounts repeatedly tweeting derogatory terms about Jews appeared to be automated “bots” that spread the message further and faster than if only people were involved.

The New York-based ADL said that before the 2016 election of President Donald Trump anti-Semitic harassment was rare, but afterward it became a daily occurrence. It commissioned a report in May that estimated about 3 million Twitter users posted or re-posted at least 4.2 million anti-Semitic tweets in English over a 12-month period ending Jan. 28.

Gab shutdown

The story of Gab, the platform where Robert Gregory Bowers allegedly wrote an ominous message early Saturday before the shooting, shows how new sites spring up in a hate-filled environment.

pittsburgh shooting, Hate
White nationalist demonstrators use shields as they guard the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. VOA

Created in 2016 to counter what founder Andrew Torba viewed as liberal censorship on social networks, Gab gained popularity among white supremacists and other right-wing radicals after tech companies clamped down on racist sites following the deadly clash at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. The Daily Stormer was offline briefly after the violence but re-emerged on a new host.

With Gab now shut down after the synagogue shooting, Torba is portraying the platform not as a hate-filled corner of the internet, but as a bastion of free speech that’s working with federal authorities “to bring justice to an alleged terrorist.”

A message posted by Torba said Gab was trying to get back online, and Segal has few doubts it will succeed.

Don Black, the former Klan leader who runs Stormfront, said traffic is up partly because of the Gab shutdown and partly because of increased interest among users. His site, which has been in operation since 1995 and has about 330,000 registered users, has only had one “prolonged” shutdown — a month following the Charlottesville melee, he said.

“I expect all sorts of more trouble now because of the Pittsburgh shooting,” Black said.

Pittsburgh, Hate, shooting
A mother and her child arrive to place flowers at a spontaneous memorial of flowers and sidewalk writing a block from the Tree of Life Synagogue. VOA

Free speech

Purging hateful content from the internet is a challenge. The Constitution’s guarantee of free-speech provides a roadblock to banning hate speech in the United States, according to the First Amendment Center, a project of the Washington-based Freedom Forum Institute.

“Political speech receives the greatest protection under the First Amendment, and discrimination against viewpoints runs counter to free-speech principles. Much hate speech qualifies as political, even if misguided,” said an essay by center scholar David L. Hudson Jr. and Mahad Ghani, a fellow with the center.

Some advocate other tactics for curbing hate.

Three days before the synagogue attack, a coalition that includes the Alabama-based Southern Poverty Law Center, a liberal advocacy organization that monitors hate groups, released a proposed framework aimed at social media companies.

The plan is geared around a model terms-of-service policy that states that platform users “may not use these services to engage in hateful activities or use these services to facilitate hateful activities engaged in elsewhere.” Next year, sponsors plan to begin posting report cards showing how sites are doing at quelling hate speech.

Pittsburgh, Hate, shooting
Monks pay their respects at a makeshift memorial outside the Tree of Life synagogue following Saturday’s shooting at the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Penn. VOA

No company has publicly announced plans to adopt the coalition’s guidelines, but Segal said the ADL separately has talked with several social media companies about limiting hate speech. Companies have been welcoming but solutions remain elusive, he said.

Also Read: Guilty Plea For The Pittsburgh Shooting Suspect

Segal added: “The commitment to eradicating hate from platforms is not always matched by the ability to do so because there is just so much content out there.” (VOA)