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India-Pak Tensions: Balochistan likely to inform international community about Indian interference

After Modi's remark on the issue of Balochistan, mixed reactions from the concerned sides, the situation still looks questionable.

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Baloch people. Wikimedia Commons

Sept 12, 2016: Earlier, welcoming Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s statement on Balochistan in his Independence Day address, several Baloch activists claimed that the people of the region support him and he should take up the Baloch issue with the international community at the United Nations.

Balochistan Chief Minister Nawab Sanaullah Khan Zehri on Sunday declared in the State capital Quetta that parliamentarians from the province would visit ‘friendly countries’ to notify them and the international community about the interference of the neighboring countries regarding the issues of Balochistan.

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A Quetta datelined report carried by the Pakistan state-run news agency- Associated Press of Pakistan (APP) on Monday quoted the Balochistan Chief Minister as saying that an open letter would also be sent to the United Nations Secretary-General on the subject.

Islamabad has been dynamically and continuously protesting against New Delhi on the issue of Balochistan ever since the Prime Minister Narendra Modi intertwined into his Independence Day speech the issues of Pak-occupied Kashmir, Gilgit in Pak and the professed human rights violations as well as insensitive killings of ordinary citizens by the Pakistani forces in the Balochistan Province.

Before this, no Indian Prime Minister had ever spoken on the issues related to Gilgit and Balochistan during the Independence Day Speech or during any public appearance.

“When you look at things from the scale of human values and humanity when innocent school children were massacred in Peshawar, Indian Parliament wept, every school in India shed tears at this tragedy. On the other hand, we have a situation where some people glorify terrorists in our country,” the Prime Minister had commented.

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APP quoted Mr. Zehri as saying that some rebellious ones had been using the Baloch youth as the “fuel for their so-called freedom fight”.

 “Several misguided youths had joined the national mainstream after leaving mountains. However, some elements were sill talking about the so-called freedom in order to mint money”, he added.

No one would be allowed to enforce his stance and philosophy on gunpoint. The security situation had already been improved to the satisfactory level in Balochistan”, the APP reported.

Balochistan Chief Minister said, “ We are not afraid of India” while stating the statement of Prime Minister Modi had cleared the situation that as to who was behind the disturbances in Balochistan.

“We are not afraid of India. All the nefarious designs of enemies will be foiled at any cost,” the APP reported.

It quoted the CM as saying that a significant development had been witnessed in law and order situation, he said, adding that according to police record some 40 to 50 persons were reported to be missing, most of them were living in Afghanistan and Dubai.

“With the completion of China-Pakistan Economic Corridor and making Gwadar Port completely functional would boost the local and national economy, besides bringing an economic revolution in the region”, the agency reported.

 “We will also make it clear to India that it was India that approached the UN several decades back on Kashmir dispute but now it is not fulfilling its promise,” said Nawaz Sharif.

On the move of Mr. Sharif to send his parliamentarians, the External Affairs Spokesperson had said, “Sending out 22 envoys is not going to make untenable claims legal. They should have sent just one envoy with the right message to the right country of putting an end to cross-border terrorism”.

The spokesperson also said that a part of J&K was illegitimately occupied by Pakistan and was a concern for India.

“The ground reality is that part of J&K is under illegal occupation of Pakistan. Any third party collaboration will be our concern,” Vikas Swarup said.

In its petition to the U.N. Secretary-General, Islamabad had termed Mr. Modi’s remarks on Balochistan and PoK as ‘unwarranted and in complete contravention’ of the U.N. Charter and reasoned that the remarks were aimed at diverting the world attention from the ongoing atrocities in the Kashmir Valley.

Where on one side, Baloch activists are happy that the world’s attention has moved towards the atrocities faced by Baloch civilians but the, on the other hand, Modi’s intervention is criticized heavily.

– prepared by NewsGram Team

Next Story

US-Taliban Meeting Cancelled, 14 Members on “The US and UN Blacklist”

A day later, Pakistan’s information minister Fawad Chaudhry confirmed the talks during a press conference, calling it a “game changer.”

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FILE - Taliban political chief Sher Muhammad Abbas Stanikzai, in the first row, second from left, Abdul Salam Hanafi and other Taliban officials pray during the intra-Afghan talks in Moscow, Feb. 6, 2019. VOA

An upcoming meeting in Pakistan between a delegation of the United States and Taliban representatives has been cancelled, according to information coming from both sides.

A Taliban leader confirmed, on condition of anonymity, that the meeting was cancelled, “by the Americans.” A Taliban statement issued later in the day said the talks were postponed because many members of its 14 person negotiating team were unable to go overseas since they are on “the US and UN blacklist.” Several of them are on the U.N. Security Council sanctions list which bars them from international travel.

Meanwhile, a U.S. official said Zalmay Khalilzad, who was supposed to lead the American delegation, is not planning to visit Islamabad this week.

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FILE – U.S. special envoy for peace in Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, center, speaks during a roundtable discussion with Afghan media at the U.S Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan Jan. 28, 2019. VOA

The U.S. said it had not received an official invitation from the government of Pakistan for this meeting which was first announced by Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid a couple of days ago.

Mujahid’s statement had set February 18 as the date of the talks and said a formal invitation had been issued by Pakistan. In addition, he said, the Taliban delegation would also meet the Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan.

A day later, Pakistan’s information minister Fawad Chaudhry confirmed the talks during a press conference, calling it a “game changer.”

“The next round of negotiations with the Taliban will be in Pakistan, and as a result of these negotiations, there is a chance of stability in Afghanistan,” he said.

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FILE – Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan (R) speaks with U.S. special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad (3rd L) during a meeting at the Prime Minister’s office in Islamabad, Pakistan, in this handout photo released Jan. 18, 2018. VOA

Afghanistan’s Foreign Ministry reacted strongly to the announcement of a meeting in Islamabad, saying it was in violation of a United Nations Security Council resolution.

“#Afghanistan complains to #UNSecurityCouncil on #Pakistan’s engagements with the Taliban on which #Afg Govenrment is not consulted,” Tweeted Sibghatullah Admadi, a spokesman for the Afghan foreign office.

Previously, Afghanistan launched a similar complaint against Russia for allowing Taliban members to travel to Moscow for a conference in which nearly 50 Afghans, including various political leaders, former jihadi commanders, and civil society activists were invited. However, the Afghan government was not invited to that conference because the Taliban have so far refused to engage with the Kabul administration despite pressure from the U.S., Saudi Arabia, and others.

President Ashraf Ghani lashed out at those attending the conference saying they had no “executive authority” to make any agreements.

“Let hundreds of such meetings be held,” he said.

Some analysts say Ghani’s statements indicated his frustration at being left out of the negotiations between the Americans and the Taliban that first started last Summer. Since then, the two sides have held several rounds of talks.

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The last meeting in Doha early January lasted for six days and Khalilzad said the two sides had agreed “in principle” to a withdrawal of foreign troops from Afghanistan in return for guarantees that Afghan soil will not be used by any terrorist groups or individuals.

Speaking in a public event at Washington based United States Institute of Peace, Khalilzad said the Taliban do not want to “sit with the government alone” because they did not want to give President Ghani an advantage in the presidential elections scheduled in July.

“There are indications that they will be willing to sit with the government in a multi-party arrangement,” he said. (VOA)