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Indian-American among math and science teachers honoured by Obama

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Darshan Jain, an Indian-American teacher is one of the 108 teachers named by President Barack Obama as recipients of the prestigious Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.

Jain, who has taught mathematics at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, Illinois for eight years where he currently serves as the director of mathematics, and other winners will receive a $10,000 award each from the National Science Foundation.

The educators will receive their awards at a Washington, DC, event later this summer.

Stevenson High School math teacher Darshan Jain is all smiles while holding his 3-year

“These teachers are shaping America’s success through their passion for math and science,” Obama said of the winners.

“Their leadership and commitment empower our children to think critically and creatively about science, technology, engineering, and math.

“The work these teachers are doing in our classrooms today will help ensure that America stays on the cutting edge tomorrow,” he said.

The Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching is awarded annually to outstanding K-12 (kindergarten through 12th grades) science and mathematics teachers from across the country.

“The Presidential Award validates my core belief that all students can learn mathematics in authentic, rigorous, and impactful ways,” Jain said.

“It is grounded in my experience that collaborative teachers can help all students achieve excellence.”

“This award provides opportunities to have discussions around improving math education at local and national levels,” he said.

“Students’ experiences in mathematics must fundamentally change in order to support our national vision for equity, access, and competitiveness.”

Jain’s industry experience includes time spent as a project engineer and a machine designer.

Darshan Jain, director of mathematics at Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, has received a Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. Here he is when he taught in the classroom.
Darshan Jain, director of mathematics at Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire – here he is when he taught in the classroom. – Daily Herald file photo

Jain’s love for teaching was inspired by his work at the Hispanic Math and Science Initiative and his students’ success in learning.

As adjunct professor for mathematics education, Jain supported novice teachers. He now leads exceptional colleagues as curriculum director for his district.

Jain has also contributed to the education community by speaking on research-based pedagogy at local, state and national conferences.

Jain has a BA in mechanical engineering and a MS in secondary mathematics education from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is pursing further graduate work. (IANS)

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Maths Could Help Understand The Spread of Infectious Diseases

Fear of public pathogens may end up driving the wrong type of behaviour if the public's information is incorrect.

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Maths can help reveal how human behaviour spreads infectious diseases
Maths can help reveal how human behaviour spreads infectious diseases. Flickr

Researchers have found that maths could help public health workers understand how human behaviour influences the spread of infectious diseases like Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

Current models used to predict the emergence and evolution of pathogens within host populations did not include social behaviour.

But adding dynamic social interactions to the new model could allow scientists to better prevent undesirable outcomes, such as more dangerous mutant strains from evolving and spreading.

“We tend to treat disease systems in isolation from social systems, and we often don’t think about how they connect to each other or influence each other,” said Chris Bauch, Professor at Waterloo University in Canada.

Injection and medicines
he team used computer simulations to analyse how the mathematical model behaved under various possible scenarios. Pixabay

“This gives us a better appreciation of how social reactions to infectious diseases can influence which strains become prominent in the population,” Bauch added.

In the study, published in the Journal of Theoretical Biology, the team used computer simulations to analyse how the mathematical model behaved under various possible scenarios.

They observed that human behaviour often changes dramatically during the outbreak, for instance, they might start using face masks.

Also Read: Cholera Infection May be on Edge in Yemen, Says WHO

Also, fear of public pathogens may end up driving the wrong type of behaviour if the public’s information is incorrect.

The new modelling could help public responses navigate and better channel these kinds of population responses, the researchers said. (IANS)

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