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Indian-American dazzles in ‘The Jungle Book’ trailer

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Los Angeles: “The Jungle Book”, starring Neel Sethi a 12-year-old boy as Mowgli, is the upcoming adventure fantasy 3D film of filmmaker Jon Favreau’s which will show the Indian-American boy who survives in the jungle among various species of animals.

The trailer of “The Jungle Book” was released on Sunday during the Super Bowl broadcast.

The trailer opens with Mowgli, who is raised by Indian wolves, being chased by a black panther who gains ground and leaps on top of him.

The black panther Bagheera, voiced by actor Ben Kingsley, stood over Mowgli and said, “If you can’t learn to run with the pack, one of these days you’ll be someone’s dinner.”

The Bengal tiger Shere Khan, voiced by Idris Elba, was then seen sniffing out Mowgli during a gathering of jungle dwellers.

Mowgli was suddenly chased by Shere Khan and narrowly escaped.

He then embarked on a journey of self discovery and along the way was lured by the seductive python Kaa, voiced by Scarlett Johansson, and also contended with the silver-tongued orangutan King Louie, voiced by Christopher Walken.

Mowgli was aided by Bagheera as well as the friendly bear Baloo, voiced by Bill Murray, as he faced dangers in the jungle.

A remake of the 1967 film of the same name, “The Jungle Book” is set to release on April 15.(IANS)(image: youtube.com)

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Indian-American scientist wins ‘Inventor of the Year’ award for Improving AI Capablities

Scientist Rajiv V. Joshi is an Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay alumnus

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Indian-American scientist Rajiv V. Joshi won the Inventor of the Year Award. (Representative Image). Pixabay

Indian-American scientist Rajiv V. Joshi has won the New York Intellectual Property Law Associations Inventor of the Year Award for his pioneering work in advancing the electronic industry and improving Artificial Intelligence (AI) capabilities, it was reported.

An Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay alumnus, Joshi was presented the 2020 award “in recognition of the contribution that the invention has and/or will make towards society as a whole” earlier this month during a virtual awards ceremony, said the American Bazaar report on Friday.

A research staff member at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Joshi holds 235 US patents.

His work focuses on the development of integrated circuits and memory chips.

He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and received the Industrial Pioneer Award from the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society in 2013 and the IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award in 2018.

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Scientist Rajiv V. Joshi is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Pixabay

Joshi holds a B.Tech. degree in mechanical engineering from IIT Bombay. He came to the US in 1977 to pursue a master’s degree at MIT and a doctoral degree at Columbia University.

According to Joshi’s biography, his novel interconnects processes and structures for aluminium, tungsten, and copper technologies are widely used in IBM for various technologies.

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Joshi has extensively worked on novel memory designs and commercialized these techniques. He received three Outstanding Technical Achievements (OTAs) and three highest Corporate Patent Portfolio Awards for licensing contributions.

A Distinguished Visiting Professor with IIT Roorkee, he was inducted into the New Jersey Inventor Hall of Fame in August 2014 along with the pioneer Nicola Tesla. (IANS)

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Indian-American Businessman Urges Trump to Reopen with “common sense precautions”

Danny Gaekwad, Indian-American businessman has urged Trump's administration to reopen the country's economy with "common sense precautions"

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Reopen the country's economy with "common sense precautions", suggests Indian-American businessman. Pixabay

A prominent Indian-American businessman has urged US President Donald Trump administration to reopen the country’s economy with “common sense precautions”, highlighting the struggles America’s hoteliers were facing during the COVID-19 lockdown, the media reported.

Speaking at a roundtable of hospitality and tourism industry, hosted by Vice President Mike Pence in Orlando on Wednesday, Danny Gaekwad, Chairman of OSEM Hospitality Management, said such a move will “help our industry and our state get our economy moving again”, the American Bazaar reported on Thursday. Gaekwad was speaking as a representative of the Asian American Hotel Owners Association (AAHOA).

Besides Pence, the event was attended by Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and several prominent business leaders from the state. Gaekwad and other industry leaders proposed a number of steps and a phased reopening of the economy. “This pandemic hit the hotel industry particularly hard, and owners and employees alike continue to struggle,” said Gaekwad, also a prominent Republican donor, told Pence.

“Reopening our businesses with common sense precautions that prioritize the health and wellbeing of employees and guests will help our industry and our state get our economy moving again.” Gaekwad, a resident of Ocala, in central Florida, drew Pence’s attention on the liquidity crisis members of AAHOA, who own nearly one in every two hotels in the country, were facing.

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Industry leaders proposed a number of steps and a phased reopening of the economy to Trump administration. Pixabay

“If there is no guest, there is no dollar. If there is no dollar, don’t even think about liquidity. Do we have liquidity? Absolutely not,” the American Bazaar quoted the businessman as saying.

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“As an immigrant, my whole family works in a business because it does bother us. I represent here more than 20,000 (AAOHA) members. We all came with an American Dream. I thought I saw 9/11, I thought I saw the greatest recession. I have never seen this and I was never prepared for this.” (IANS)

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Researchers Use AI To Turn (2D) Images Into 3D

Artificial Intelligence can now be used to convert 2D images into 3D

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Researchers used AI to turn two-dimensional (2D) images into stacks of virtual three-dimensional (3D) slices showing activity inside organisms. Pixabay

A team of researchers has used Artificial Intelligence (AI) to turn two-dimensional (2D) images into stacks of virtual three-dimensional (3D) slices showing activity inside organisms.

Using deep learning techniques, the team from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) devised a technique that extends the capabilities of fluorescence microscopy, which allows scientists to precisely label parts of living cells and tissue with dyes that glow under special lighting.

In a study published in the journal Nature Methods, the scientists also reported that their framework, called “Deep-Z,” was able to fix errors or aberrations in images, such as when a sample is tilted or curved.

Further, they demonstrated that the system could take 2D images from one type of microscope and virtually create 3D images of the sample as if they were obtained by another, more advanced microscope.

“This is a very powerful new method that is enabled by deep learning to perform 3D imaging of live specimens, with the least exposure to light, which can be toxic to samples,” said senior author Aydogan Ozcan, UCLA chancellor’s professor of electrical and computer engineering.

In addition to sparing specimens from potentially damaging doses of light, this system could offer biologists and life science researchers a new tool for 3D imaging that is simpler, faster and much less expensive than current methods.

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3D imaging that shows the activity inside organisms has been made easier with the use of AI. Pixabay

The opportunity to correct for aberrations may allow scientists studying live organisms to collect data from images that otherwise would be unusable.

Investigators could also gain virtual access to expensive and complicated equipment, said researchers.

“Deep-Z” was taught using experimental images from a scanning fluorescence microscope, which takes pictures focused at multiple depths to achieve 3D imaging of samples.

In thousands of training runs, the neural network learned how to take a 2D image and infer accurate 3D slices at different depths within a sample.

Then, the framework was tested blindly – fed with images that were not part of its training, with the virtual images compared to the actual 3D slices obtained from a scanning microscope, providing an excellent match.

The researchers also found that Deep-Z could produce 3D images from 2D surfaces where samples were tilted or curved.

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“This feature was actually very surprising,” said Yichen Wu, a UCLA graduate student who is co-first author of the publication. “With it, you can see through curvature or other complex topology that is very challenging to image.” (IANS)