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Indian-Americans create Political Action Committee to raise funds for Donald Trump

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New York: Political Action Committee (PAC)was created by some Indian-Americans in the New York Tristate area to support and raise funds for Donald Trump. As he is also being called as the “best hope for America” by these people.

Headed by Dr AD Amar, a business professor at Seton Hall University in New Jersey, the ‘Indian-Americans for Trump 2016’ was registered as a PAC with the Federal Election Commission last week.

Its sole goal is “to garner actively the support of all Americans, but particularly Indian-Americans, to have Donald J Trump become the next President of the USA,” the PAC said in a press release.

“On realizing that the agenda of Donald J Trump for President 2016 is focused on reviving the American economy, rightly bringing America on the world stage, defeating terrorism and establishing peace through strength; many Indian-Americans believe that he is the best hope for America and the right candidate to be the next president of the United States,” the PAC said in a statement.

The real estate billionaire also declared and vowed not to seek support from PACs or take money from individuals or special interest groups.

And by people’s choice, Anand Ahuja, an attorney based in New York, and Devendra “Dave” Makkar, a businessman in New Jersey, have been “elected” vice president and treasurer respectively.

Publisher of some community news publications in New Jersey, Dr Sudhir Parikh has been declared the head of fundraising and advisory committee of India-Americans for Trump 2016.

Amar said, “This is only the first step. We are on the side of Trump for this election” explaining Trump’s policies on illegal immigration and economy in particular as the main reason for his group to support the Republican contender.

Nikki Haley, Governor of South Carolina-India, have requested supporters and protestors to stay “Civil and respectful” and also made a pitch for expanding the party’s base.

“I think what Mr Trump is doing is continuing to push through this candidacy. I think he’s continuing to move forward. All we ask is that everybody stay civil and respectful in the way they do that,” she was quoted as saying at a press conference by State newspaper.

“My goal was coming off after the last election with Mitt Romney (in 2012) was to make sure that I did everything I could to open that umbrella – to make sure we opened it up to Indian-Americans, Jewish-Americans, to make sure Hispanics and women felt a part of the Republican party,” the governor said.

Haley, who gave the Republican response to President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address earlier this month said”What I did with the address was very much start that conversation, which is we need to grow our umbrella. We don’t have room to close it,”

“But what I want Republican specifically to do is to remember that we want to grow that tent out. There’s a group of Republicans like me, who have seen that we have a great slate of minorities that are in elected office.”

Haley says she would not expect Trump to become more civil if he becomes the party nominee.

“We’ll find out,” she said.(IANS)

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Americans Tend to Rely on Social Media for News which is often Unreliable: Report

Those who rely on social media and peers for news, on the other hand, don't see those platforms as reliable yet still choose to get their news from these sources

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The findings of a research suggest that perceived reliability is not the only factor that drives what Americans choose as their go-to News sources on Social Media. Pixabay

Owing to lack of time and competing demands, one-third of Americans rely on news platforms they acknowledge are less reliable, mainly social media and peers, says a new report.

The other two-thirds of the public consider their primary news sources trustworthy, mainly print news and broadcast television, according to the report from California-based non-profit RAND Corporation.

“A lack of time and competing demands may explain why a third of Americans turn to news sources they deem less reliable, which suggests improving the quality of news content or teaching people how to ‘better consume’ news isn’t enough to address ‘Truth Decay,'” said Jennifer Kavanagh, senior political scientist and co-author of the report.

“Media companies and other news providers may need to provide more easily accessible and digestible ways for individuals to consume high quality investigative journalism”.

“Truth Decay” is a phenomenon defined as diminishing reliance on facts, data and analysis in public life.

The report draws from a national survey of 2,543 Americans to examine how reliability, demographics and political partisanship factor into news choices and how often people seek out differing viewpoints in the news.

About 44 per cent of respondents reported that news is as reliable now as in the past, while 41 per cent said it has become less reliable and 15 per cent – mostly women, racial and ethnic minorities and those without college degrees – said it is more reliable.

Social Media
Owing to lack of time and competing demands, one-third of Americans rely on News platforms they acknowledge are less reliable, mainly Social Media and peers, says a new report. Pixabay

Respondents who lean on print and broadcast platforms were more likely to deem them reliable.

Those who rely on social media and peers for news, on the other hand, don’t see those platforms as reliable yet still choose to get their news from these sources.

“The findings suggest that perceived reliability is not the only factor that drives what Americans choose as their go-to news sources,” said Michael Pollard, a sociologist and lead author of the report.
“Despite acknowledging that there are more reliable sources for news, people with demands on their time may be limited to using less reliable platforms.”

Asked whether they ever seek out alternate viewpoints when catching up on the news, 54 per cent said they “sometimes” do, 20 percent said, “always or almost always,” 17 per cent said “infrequently,” and 9 percent said, “never or almost never.”

The report also identified the four most common combinations of news media types consumed by Americans: print publications and broadcast television, online, radio, and social media and peers.

Those who are college-educated were less likely to get their news from social media and peers, instead opting for radio and online sources.

Social Media
Media companies and other News providers may need to provide more easily accessible and digestible ways for individuals to consume high quality investigative journalism, especially on Social Media. Pixabay

Those with less than a college education were more likely to report “never or almost never” seeking out news with alternate viewpoints.

“Those who are married were three times more likely than singles to rate their peers as the most reliable source for news,” said the report.

ALSO READ: Here’s how you can Appear More Competent Through your Clothing

Unmarried people were more likely than married people to report they “always or almost always” seek out sources with differing views. (IANS)