Thursday March 21, 2019
Home World Indian educat...

Indian educational push for Ghanaian small town

0
//

books1

Accra (Ghana): India is to set aside two scholarships every year for post-graduate students from Patriensah, a small town in this West African nation’s Asante-Akim district that is attempting to improve its falling educational standards. The two scholarships will come out of about 25 offered annually to Ghanaian students for higher education in India.

“We send up to 250 Ghanaian nationals from different walks of life to India for various training and skill development progammes,” Indian High Commissioner to Ghana K. JeevaSagar said and promised to consider at least 10 applications from Patriensah every year.

This is being done following a decision taken by the chiefs and people of the town to establish a foundation to help improve its falling educational standards, Sagar told IANS.

The chief of Patriensah, Nana Osei Darkwa, set up the Nana Osei Dankwa Education Foundation (ODEF) to fight the high dropout rate in the town of only 8,000 with poor educational infrastructure and inadequate basic teaching material.

Sagar, who was impressed with the move, said the initiative to improve the education of the people would give them “dignity and improve” their self-confidence.

“India’s founding fathers placed a great deal of emphasis on education and development of science and technology,” he said, and promised to look at how selected people from the town could benefit from training for artisans and craftsmen at the India’s National Institute of Design.

This training will help improve skills in basketry, weaving and woodwork, Sagar said, adding: “We would also be able to help in value addition to various resources if Patriensah can identify them and bring in Indian investors.”

“For developing countries like India and Ghana, small and medium enterprises and agriculture offer the best areas of economic cooperation,” he added.

The high commissioner said that when the foundation takes a more concrete shape, India could look at areas for cooperation in the information and communications technology sector.

“We could help the foundation with training of instructors and even exchange of experts,” he said.

According to Sagar, education without values is meaningless and while teachers and academics impart education, it is the community which should inculcate its values, and congratulated the people of Patriensa for doing just that. (IANS)

Next Story

Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

0
water
Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

water
Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

water
Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)