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Most Indian Employees Disagree With Bosses On Equality in their Companies: Accenture Study

Employees don't agree with bosses on gender equality in India

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Gender equality
Iin India, most employees disagree with the company leaders on equality in their organisations. Pixabay

Despite so much talk on inclusively at workplace, a huge perception gap persists in India where most employees disagree with the company leaders on equality in their organisations, an Accenture study has revealed.

Nearly all leaders in India (94 per cent) believe their people feel included, yet just one third (36 per cent) of employees agree and while two out of three leaders (66 per cent) feel they create empowering environments where people have a sense of belonging, less than half (48 per cent) of employees agree, said the report titled “Getting to Equal 2020: The Hidden Value of Culture Makers.”

“A significant gap exists between the way leaders and employees view progress toward equality in their organizations, according to a new cross industry research from Accenture. Closing the gap will yield substantial benefits for companies and their employees,” the findings showed. The report covered several industries across 28 countries including India and found that organizations are at an inflection point.

“For every organisation today, building a culture of equality needs as much focus as any other business goal,” said Rekha M Menon, Chairman and Senior Managing Director, Accenture in India. “In an era where innovation drives growth, people are the most valuable source of competitive advantage, and equality and empowerment are key to unleashing their potential,” she added.

Gender equality
A significant gap exists between the way leaders and employees view progress toward equality in their organizations, according to a new cross industry research from Accenture. Pixabay

Today’s workforce believes it is critical to helping them thrive in the workplace (reported by 88 per cent of women and 77 per cent of men in India), while majority of leaders (91 per cent in India) believe an inclusive workplace culture is vital to the success of their business.

Most leaders rank diversity and workplace culture low on their list of top organisational priorities. A majority of leaders in India ranked brand recognition and quality (84 per cent), and financial performance (78 per cent) at the top of their list of priorities, while only 37 per cent ranked diversity on top.

Aligning leaders’ perceptions with those of their employees would yield significant upsides. “Everyone – both women and men – would advance faster, and global profits would increase by $3.7 trillion, including $1.35 trillion in the Asia Pacific region,” said the study.

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In India, the proportion of women who feel like a key member of their team with real influence over decisions would rise from 1-in-5 to more than 1-in-3. “The annual retention rate in India would increase by 2 per cent for women from 88 per cent to 90 per cent,” it added. (IANS)

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Apple Hardware Teams Battle New Challenges Amidst Travel Restrictions

Apple on March 6 suggested its employees on the California campuses to work from home as an "extra precaution" eve as new coronavirus cases spread on the west coast in the US

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Microsoft
Apple is also especially reliant on face-to-face meetings and internal file-sharing and communications software. Some employees also told The Information that they hope Apple will continue to allow flexible and remote work options after COVID-19. Pixabay

 Apple hardware teams are battling new set of challenges owing to strict security guidelines and travel restrictions as the tech giant prepares for the prototyping of next devices.

New Apple TV, HomePod, iMac, iPhones and other hardware are due later this year. According to a report in The Information, core Apple staff has resorted to tracing shapes in the air to describe components they’ve had to leave back in the office.

“Because of travel restrictions, they’ve had to make decisions based on grainy photos of parts sent from Chinese factories, rather than doing so in person,” the report said. Apple’s hardware teams meet in person at the Cupertino, California-based headquarters to “review upcoming products, often bringing key components of their devices to show colleagues”.

Since most of Apple employees are at home owing to the state’s “shelter-in-place” policy, the iPhone maker “faces a unique set of challenges because of its secretive culture, focus on hardware and dependence on Chinese manufacturing”. The report is based on dozens of interviews The Information conducted in recent days with current and former employees, as well as others who work closely with the company.

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Apple is also especially reliant on face-to-face meetings and internal file-sharing and communications software. Some employees also told The Information that they hope Apple will continue to allow flexible and remote work options after COVID-19.

Apple
Apple hardware teams are battling new set of challenges owing to strict security guidelines and travel restrictions as the tech giant prepares for the prototyping of next devices. Pixabay

A recent report in Wall Street Journal said that Apple workers at home realise that slow home network speeds and confusing security restrictions are impacting their ability to work effectively. Software developers who were sent home have been complaining about what work they are allowed to perform remotely. Other employees have been unable to access key internal systems from home due to Apple’s stringent security policies.

ALSO READ: Microsoft To Unveil New “365 Personal and Family Subscriptions” From April 21

Apple on March 6 suggested its employees on the California campuses to work from home as an “extra precaution” eve as new coronavirus cases spread on the west coast in the US.

In an updated statement, Tim Cook said that all of Apple offices are moving to flexible work arrangements worldwide outside of Greater China. (IANS)