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Indian IT professional killed family after online research

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London: An India-born IT professional in Britain stabbed his wife and two daughters to death after researching how to cut someone’s throat — then lived with their bodies for a weekend before hanging himself.

Jitendra Lad, 49, his wife Dukshaben Lad, 44, and their daughters Trisha, 19, and Nisha, 16, were discovered at their home in Clayton, Bradford, last October days after celebrating Diwali, the Daily Mail reported on Wednesday.

Lad had researched on depression and how to cut someone’s throat on the internet in the days leading up to the tragedy, an inquest into the deaths was told.

Lad was found hang while the three other members of the “model” family had all been stabbed in their beds with a knife. The crime scene was described as a “scene of unimaginable horror”.

The Bradford Coroner’s Court heard that Dukshaben, also known as Daksha, and her two daughters were probably killed in the early hours of Saturday, October 25. 

But Lad was seen by a number of people later the same weekend. He probably killed himself on Monday afternoon, two days later, the court heard.

The hearing was told how Lad had no medical history of mental illness and relatives and friends said they appeared to be a normal, loving family.

The hearing also heard that Lad had been stressed at work as an IT manager, and was concerned that he had been over-promoted.

The inquest heard how the bodies were discovered at the house when Daksha’s father became concerned after no one answered the phone at Lad’s house.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Depression in Children Stay Undetected by Parents and Teachers- Study

The gold standard for identifying children who might be at risk for developing depression later in life is to ask the children themselves

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Studies: More Green Space, Less Crime, Depression in Poor Areas Pixabay

Parents and teachers may find it difficult to detect depression in young children, that can affect their social skills and academics, a new study shows.

According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America, as many as 2-3 per cent of children aged between 6-12 might have a major depressive disorder.

But parents and teachers face difficulties in recognising depression in children.

The findings, appearing in the Journal of School Psychology, showed that children who show mild to severe symptoms of depression in second and third grades are six times more likely to have skill deficits, such as difficulties with social skills or academics, than children without symptoms.

However, when teachers and parents were asked to rate a child’s level of depression, there was only about 5-10 per cent overlap in their ratings.

Depression
Parents and teachers face difficulties in recognising depression in children. Pixabay

“Some people would view that overlap as the truth about a child’s well-being and areas of disagreement as errors, but we need to explore the possibility that each of them are seeing different aspects of children’s behaviour and mental health,” said Keith Herman, professor in the University of Missouri (MU), College of Education.

For the study, the team completed profile analyses of 643 children in early elementary school to explore how patterns between student, teacher and parent reporting can be used to gain a holistic picture of a child’s mental health.

Herman suggested that mental health professionals could work with teachers and parents to identify depressive symptoms early by including self reports from children in mental health evaluations.

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“The gold standard for identifying children who might be at risk for developing depression later in life is to ask the children themselves,” noted Herman.

“However, even if a child doesn’t say they feel depressed, certain outward behaviours might provide clues to the state of the child’s mental health. It’s important for teachers and parents to catch these behaviours early to prevent long-term problems that occur with depression,” he said. (IANS)

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