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Indian IT professional killed family after online research

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London: An India-born IT professional in Britain stabbed his wife and two daughters to death after researching how to cut someone’s throat — then lived with their bodies for a weekend before hanging himself.

Jitendra Lad, 49, his wife Dukshaben Lad, 44, and their daughters Trisha, 19, and Nisha, 16, were discovered at their home in Clayton, Bradford, last October days after celebrating Diwali, the Daily Mail reported on Wednesday.

Lad had researched on depression and how to cut someone’s throat on the internet in the days leading up to the tragedy, an inquest into the deaths was told.

Lad was found hang while the three other members of the “model” family had all been stabbed in their beds with a knife. The crime scene was described as a “scene of unimaginable horror”.

The Bradford Coroner’s Court heard that Dukshaben, also known as Daksha, and her two daughters were probably killed in the early hours of Saturday, October 25. 

But Lad was seen by a number of people later the same weekend. He probably killed himself on Monday afternoon, two days later, the court heard.

The hearing was told how Lad had no medical history of mental illness and relatives and friends said they appeared to be a normal, loving family.

The hearing also heard that Lad had been stressed at work as an IT manager, and was concerned that he had been over-promoted.

The inquest heard how the bodies were discovered at the house when Daksha’s father became concerned after no one answered the phone at Lad’s house.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Are bullied kids prone to suicidal behaviour?

Children who experienced severe peer victimisation were more than twice as likely to report depression or low moods at age 15, and three times more likely to report anxiety

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Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
  • Children face most severe levels of victimization from the beginning of their schooling.
  • These kids develop significant symptoms of suicidal behaviour and anxiety.
  • Even after the victimization ends, it affects still pertains.

A study found that children who face bullying can be at a risk of developing mental health issues, suicidal thoughts and anxiety in their years. For the study, the team looked at 1,363 children who were followed until the age of 15 years.

About 59 percent of participants had experienced some peer victimisation in the first years of elementary school, although it generally declined as the children grew older.

“Our findings showed a general tendency, in about 15 percent of the children, of being exposed to the most severe levels of victimisation from the beginning of their education until the transition to high school,” said Marie-Claude Geoffroy, from the McGill University in Canada.

Also Read: Anxiety and depression genetic, says research

Even though victimization can end after school days, its affect still pertains. Pixabay
Even though victimization can end after school days, its affect still pertains. Pixabay

Findings

  • Children who experienced severe peer victimisation were more than twice as likely to report depression or low moods at age 15, and three times more likely to report anxiety.
  • This group of children were also 3.5 times more likely to report serious suicidal thoughts or attempt suicide.

“Those children were at greater risk of debilitating depressive/dysthymic symptoms or anxiety and of suicidality in adolescence than less severely victimised children, even after we accounted for a plethora of confounders assessed throughout childhood,” Geoffroy added.

Also read: List of 8 Food Items to Battle Depression and Anxiety

“Although peer victimisation starts to decrease by the end of childhood, individuals in the severe trajectory group were still being exposed to the highest level of victimisation in early adolescence,” Geoffroy noted.

Severe peer victimisation may contribute to the development of mental health problems in adolescence, thus, it is important to prevent victimisation early in the lifespan, the results suggest.

The study was published in journal CMAJ. (IANS)

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