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Indian Man Atulkumar Babubhai Patel who came to US from Latin America without proper documents has died while in federal custody

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FILE - Passengers wait in line at Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta.VOA
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New York, May 19, 2017: An Indian man who came to the US from Latin America without proper documents has died while in federal custody in Atlanta, in Georgia state, according to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency.

Atulkumar Babubhai Patel, 58, died on Tuesday at an Atlanta hospital, the ICE said in a statement. “The preliminary cause of death has been ruled to be complications from congestive heart failure,” it added.

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The Indian citizen arrived in Atlanta on May 10 from Quito, Ecuador, without the necessary immigration documents and on May 11 US Customs and Border Protection officials transferred him to ICE custody, the agency said.

When Patel was admitted to the Atlanta Detention Center, an initial medical screening showed he had high blood pressure and diabetes, the ICE said.

On May 13, a nurse checking his blood sugar noticed he “had shortness of breath and he was promptly transported to Grady Memorial Hospital for additional evaluation and treatment where he later died”, it added.

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The Indian Consulate General in Atlanta was informed about Patel’s death and they have informed his family, the ICE said.

The Atlanta Journal Constitution newspaper reported that Patel was the second person to die in ICE custody in Georgia within two days.

A Panamanian citizen was found dead at another ICE centre with a sheet around his neck, the newspaper said.

Shana Tabak, an immigration law professor who heads a Georgia lawyers’ network helping ICE detainees, called the two deaths “shocking and tragic”, the newspaper reported.

She told the newspaper that the government was constitutionally obligated to provide detainees with adequate medical care “and two deaths in Georgia in one week certainly raises the question to me of whether the ICE and the US government are meeting those legal obligations”. (IANS)

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A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

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Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

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Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)