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Indian-origin Harnish Patel’s widow pleads for ‘selflessness and love’ to honour his memory

Harnish Patel, who immigrated to the US in 2003, ran a convenience store

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New York, March 11, 2017: The widow of Harnish Patel, an Indian-origin businessman who was shot dead outside his home in South Carolina, has made a plea for “selflessness and love” to honour his memory.

“To honour the memory of Harnish, please continue to demonstrate selflessness and love to one another each and every day,” Sonal Patel said in a statement on Thursday to the local daily, Lancaster News.

Harnish Patel’s brother, Nirav said that Sonal was staying strong and focused getting her and her son’s lives back to as normal as possible, the daily reported.

Harnish Patel, who immigrated to the US in 2003, ran a convenience store. He was shot on March 2 when he reached his house in Lancaster, South Carolina, after closing the store.

As for the motive behind his killing, Nirav Patel told the Lancaster News: “We just don’t know. Nobody knows yet.”

The family was “very good friends with the law enforcement community, and they trust them completely. Right now, we’re just letting them do their job,” he added.

Meanwhile, Doug Barfield, a lawyer for the sheriff’s office, told the daily that a full team of investigators were working on the case with the help of state law enforcement agents.

Many people were interviewed but no arrests so far. (IANS)

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USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

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Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)

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