Tuesday March 26, 2019
Home Lead Story Indian Origin...

Indian Origin Team Develops Model For Safer Self-driving Cars

"When the system is deployed into the real world, it can use learned model to act more cautiously and intelligently," said Ramakrishnan

0
//
Uber began testing self-driving cars in Pittsburgh and is now rolling out the service in San Francisco. (Uber), VOA

A team of Indian American researchers has developed a novel model that uses human inputs to uncover Artificial Intelligence (AI) “blind spots” in self-driving cars, so that the vehicles can avoid dangerous errors in the real world.

The model developed by MIT and Microsoft researchers identifies instances in which autonomous systems have “learned” from training examples that don’t match what’s actually happening in the real world.

Engineers could use this model to improve the safety of AI systems, such as driverless vehicles and autonomous robots.

“The model helps autonomous systems better know what they don’t know,” said first author Ramya Ramakrishnan from Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT.

“Many times, when these systems are deployed, their trained simulations don’t match the real-world setting [and] they could make mistakes, such as getting into accidents.

“The idea is to use humans to bridge that gap between simulation and the real world, in a safe way, so we can reduce some of those errors,” explained Ramakrishnan.

Waymo, driverless cars
Waymo has been giving rides to a group of volunteer passengers in Arizona in driverless cars since last year. Flickr

The AI systems powering driverless cars are trained extensively in virtual simulations to prepare the vehicle for nearly every event on the road.

But sometimes the car makes an unexpected error in the real world because an event occurs that should, but doesn’t, alter the car’s behaviour.

The researchers validated their method using video games, with a simulated human correcting the learned path of an on-screen character.

The next step is to incorporate the model with traditional training and testing approaches for autonomous cars and robots with human feedback.

Also Read- Facebook Restricts External Campaigners From Accessing Political Ads

Co-authors on the papers are Julie Shah, an associate professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and head of the CSAIL’s Interactive Robotics Group; and Ece Kamar, Debadeepta Dey, and Eric Horvitz — all from Microsoft Research.

“When the system is deployed into the real world, it can use learned model to act more cautiously and intelligently,” said Ramakrishnan. (IANS)

Next Story

Auto History Museum to Add First Self-Driving Test Vehicles

The GM-donated vehicle originally made its debut testing on the streets of San Francisco in 2016

0
auto museum
FILE - Several Chevrolet Bolt EV vehicles are shown during a tour of the General Motors Orion Assembly plant in Orion Township, Michigan, Nov. 4, 2016. VOA

One of General Motors’ first self-driving test vehicles is going on display at an automotive history museum in suburban Detroit.

The Henry Ford history attraction announced Tuesday that it has acquired a modified pre-production Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicle.

auto museum
FILE – In this Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, General Motors Chairman and CEO Mary Barra speaks next to a autonomous Chevrolet Bolt electric car, in Detroit. VOA

The GM-donated vehicle originally made its debut testing on the streets of San Francisco in 2016. Now it will be displayed at the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation in Dearborn.

The camera- and sensor-equipped vehicle is the first autonomous car to be added to The Henry Ford collection. It’ll be next to a 1959 Cadillac El Dorado at the “Driving America” exhibit, which chronicles the history of the automobile.

ALSO READ: School Students Set to March for Global Climate Change Strike

The Henry Ford President and CEO Patricia Mooradian says self-driving capabilities “will fundamentally change our relationship with the automobile.” She says the acquisition “is paramount in how we tell that story.” (VOA)