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India’s Youngest CEO: 16 year-old Anubhav Wadhwa’s initiative to dispose old Tyres through ‘Tyrelessly’

Old tyres are collected from people's doorsteps, and then they are recycled into fuel and steel for the purpose of reuse

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Old and used tyres Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Anubhav started a company ‘Tyrelessly’, which works to dispose old and used tyres in an eco-friendly manner
  • He is an entrepreneur, designer, data analyst, computer programmer and a social activist
  • He is also the founder and CEO of software firm TechAPTO

Small changes can create big differences- is what one will say of 16 year-old Anubhav. Instead of criticizing the authorities and complaining about the population for the rising levels of pollution, this teenaager has decided to take an initiative to do something.

Anubhav, a resident of Gurgaon, has started a company, called Tyrelessly, which works to dispose old and used tyres in an eco-friendly manner. He is inviting more people to do their bit for this good cause.

Anubhav Wadhwa Image Source: thebetterindia.com
Anubhav Wadhwa Image Source: thebetterindia.com

It all started after Wadhwa saw someone setting a couple of tyres on fire and then he went online to learn how tyres are disposed once they have outlived their usefulness. He got to learn about a number of toxic gases released by burning tyres into the air leading to an environmental threat. In a hope to stop this practise, he started his company, tirelessly on December 15, 2015 and soon the first pilot was rolled out.

Wadhwa, a student of Pathways World School, Aravali, Haryana, and a member of the student council, when returns home from school at 5 PM, he becomes an entrepreneur, designer, data analyst, computer programmer and a social activist.

Old tyres are collected from people’s doorsteps, and then they are recycled into fuel and steel for the purpose of reuse. One just needs to visit the Tyrelessly web platform, and give the location by clicking on the ‘Tyreless’ option, after which a truck comes and picks up the old tyre. Tirelessly provides free service and gets its revenue be selling these byproducts of tyres. Apart from recycling the tyres, the team members of tirelessly also work to aware people about the risk of burning tyres.

Tyres recycling in Sweden Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Tyres recycling in Sweden Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

He has not only started Tyrelessly but he is also the founder and CEO of software firm TechAPTO. He has also developed websites for several companies and was included among the youngest CEOs of India in 2013.

-prepared by Pashchiema, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @pashchiema

ALSO READ:

  • AJ Krish

    The toxic fumes released when tires are burnt are very harmful to the environment. Anubhav has done what we had never thought about. By recycling the tires and creating awareness about the harmful effects of burning them, he has created a better place.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Giving ideas is one thing but implementing these ideas is a great job that should be done. It takes almost years for people to understand the new way of living life if these ideas are to be implemented and used in real life.

  • Aparna Gupta

    Recycling tyres will lower the amount of toxic emissions taking place and reduce the level of global warming.

SHARE
  • AJ Krish

    The toxic fumes released when tires are burnt are very harmful to the environment. Anubhav has done what we had never thought about. By recycling the tires and creating awareness about the harmful effects of burning them, he has created a better place.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Giving ideas is one thing but implementing these ideas is a great job that should be done. It takes almost years for people to understand the new way of living life if these ideas are to be implemented and used in real life.

  • Aparna Gupta

    Recycling tyres will lower the amount of toxic emissions taking place and reduce the level of global warming.

Next Story

Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)