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India’s Youngest CEO: 16 year-old Anubhav Wadhwa’s initiative to dispose old Tyres through ‘Tyrelessly’

Old tyres are collected from people's doorsteps, and then they are recycled into fuel and steel for the purpose of reuse

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Old and used tyres Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Anubhav started a company ‘Tyrelessly’, which works to dispose old and used tyres in an eco-friendly manner
  • He is an entrepreneur, designer, data analyst, computer programmer and a social activist
  • He is also the founder and CEO of software firm TechAPTO

Small changes can create big differences- is what one will say of 16 year-old Anubhav. Instead of criticizing the authorities and complaining about the population for the rising levels of pollution, this teenaager has decided to take an initiative to do something.

Anubhav, a resident of Gurgaon, has started a company, called Tyrelessly, which works to dispose old and used tyres in an eco-friendly manner. He is inviting more people to do their bit for this good cause.

Anubhav Wadhwa Image Source: thebetterindia.com
Anubhav Wadhwa Image Source: thebetterindia.com

It all started after Wadhwa saw someone setting a couple of tyres on fire and then he went online to learn how tyres are disposed once they have outlived their usefulness. He got to learn about a number of toxic gases released by burning tyres into the air leading to an environmental threat. In a hope to stop this practise, he started his company, tirelessly on December 15, 2015 and soon the first pilot was rolled out.

Wadhwa, a student of Pathways World School, Aravali, Haryana, and a member of the student council, when returns home from school at 5 PM, he becomes an entrepreneur, designer, data analyst, computer programmer and a social activist.

Old tyres are collected from people’s doorsteps, and then they are recycled into fuel and steel for the purpose of reuse. One just needs to visit the Tyrelessly web platform, and give the location by clicking on the ‘Tyreless’ option, after which a truck comes and picks up the old tyre. Tirelessly provides free service and gets its revenue be selling these byproducts of tyres. Apart from recycling the tyres, the team members of tirelessly also work to aware people about the risk of burning tyres.

Tyres recycling in Sweden Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Tyres recycling in Sweden Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

He has not only started Tyrelessly but he is also the founder and CEO of software firm TechAPTO. He has also developed websites for several companies and was included among the youngest CEOs of India in 2013.

-prepared by Pashchiema, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @pashchiema

ALSO READ:

  • AJ Krish

    The toxic fumes released when tires are burnt are very harmful to the environment. Anubhav has done what we had never thought about. By recycling the tires and creating awareness about the harmful effects of burning them, he has created a better place.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Giving ideas is one thing but implementing these ideas is a great job that should be done. It takes almost years for people to understand the new way of living life if these ideas are to be implemented and used in real life.

  • Aparna Gupta

    Recycling tyres will lower the amount of toxic emissions taking place and reduce the level of global warming.

SHARE
  • AJ Krish

    The toxic fumes released when tires are burnt are very harmful to the environment. Anubhav has done what we had never thought about. By recycling the tires and creating awareness about the harmful effects of burning them, he has created a better place.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Giving ideas is one thing but implementing these ideas is a great job that should be done. It takes almost years for people to understand the new way of living life if these ideas are to be implemented and used in real life.

  • Aparna Gupta

    Recycling tyres will lower the amount of toxic emissions taking place and reduce the level of global warming.

Next Story

Monitoring Method May Help To Conserve Lions in India

In the new study, Keshab Gogoi and his colleagues have demonstrated an alternative method for monitoring Asiatic lions

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Lions
Conserving this sub-specie of lions with the use of best scientific methods is a global priority and responsibility, according to authors of the study from the Wildlife Institute of India (WII). Pixabay

An alternative method of monitoring endangered lions in India can help improve estimates of their numbers and also in making informed conservation policy and management decisions.

New conservation practices have helped increase the number of Asiatic lions from 50 to 500 in the Gir Forests of Gujarat.

Accurate estimates are needed for better conservation efforts, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The existing methods, particularly a technique known as total counts, can miss some and double-count others. Also, they provide limited information on the spatial density.

Conserving this sub-specie of lions with the use of best scientific methods is a global priority and responsibility, according to authors of the study from the Wildlife Institute of India (WII).

In the new study, Keshab Gogoi and his colleagues have demonstrated an alternative method for monitoring Asiatic lions.

“Our research addresses this priority by developing a robust approach to their population assessment and monitoring, which can be used for all lion populations across the world,” said an author.

Gogoi and colleagues used whisker patterns and permanent body marks to identify lions using a computer programme, and analysed the data with a mathematical modelling method known as ‘spatially explicit capture recapture’ to estimate the lion density.

They also assessed the prey density and other factors that could influence the lion density.

Lion, Predator, Dangerous, Mane, Big Cat, Male, Zoo
An alternative method of monitoring endangered lions in India can help improve estimates of their numbers and also in making informed conservation policy and management decisions. Pixabay

The researchers identified 67 lions of the 368 sightings within the 725 sq km study area in the Gir Forests, estimating an overall density of 8.53 lions per 100 sq km. They found the prey density didn’t appear to influence the lion density variations in the study area.

The lion density was higher in the flat valley habitats (as opposed to rugged or elevated areas) and near sites where food had been placed to attract lions for tourists to see them.

ALSO READ: You Can Now Pre-Book New Samsung’s Foldable Smartphone “Galaxy Z Flip” in India

The study suggests that baiting lions for tourism affects their natural density patterns, in line with other researches that baiting disrupts lion behaviour and social dynamics.

The authors said the alternative monitoring method could be used to assess lions across their range (in India and Africa) and better conservation efforts. (IANS)