Sunday March 24, 2019

Indonesia’s immoral Surgical Strike on condoms for the celebration of Valentine’s Day

“Valentine’s Day is often misused by teenagers to have casual sex, this can destroy the morality of the nation”

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Indonesia
Indonesian authorities seize condoms in order to discourage teenagers from having sex on Valentine's day. Image courtesy: VOA

Makassar (Indonesia), Feb 15, 2017: When the whole world was engrossed in painting the town red with love and romance, Indonesia made the best efforts to shun the love in its air.

Indonesian authorities barged in on convenience stores and seized condoms in Makassar, a major city in Indonesia, to stop teenagers having casual sex on Valentine’s Day.

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The mayor of Makassar, a conservative city on central Sulawesi island, led public order officers in the raids late Monday, on the eve of the celebration. Mayor Mohammad Ramdhan Pomanto clarified his stance stating that he was not against the sale of condoms, but the outlets needed to be more cautious about whom they were sold to, as reported by AFP

“Valentine’s Day is often misused by teenagers to have casual sex, this can destroy the morality of the nation,” Pomanto was quoted as saying in local media.

Iman Hud, head of the local public officers, similar to police but with fewer powers told AFP that convenience stores had been failing to verify teenagers’ IDs to check whether they were at least 18 years old, the age of consent, before selling them condoms.

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“We are doing this to prevent promiscuity,” he said, adding that hundreds of condoms were seized in the raids in the city of 1.3 million

In the world’s most populous Muslim preponderance nation, Islamic clerics and some devout Muslims mark this occasion as to denounce what they consider as Western sway which corrupts the youth to indulge into debauchery.

On Monday teenage pupils, including girls in headscarves, staged a protest outside a school in the city of Surabaya, chanting: “Say no to Valentine!”

Like every year, Valentine’s day celebration was banned by Indonesian authorities in some parts of the country.

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But undeterred by all the reluctance, many Indonesians rejoiced the day with their partners, particularly in major cities where cards and chocolates are widely available. Most of the population follow a moderate form of Islam in the country.
This act of Indonesian government raises a few questions over its motive and outcome.
Will this awkward act of moral policing actually help the government in curbing what they instate as the Western influence?
The paucity of condoms is sufficient enough to discourage teenagers from involving into sexual acts?
If not, then wouldn’t this act pose a threat of teenage pregnancies and contiguity with Sexually Transferrable Diseases?
-prepared by Ashish Srivastava of NewsGram Twitter @PhulRetard

 

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Facebook Not Going To Allow Foreign-Funded Add That May Influence Indonesia’s Elections

The company said it had also prohibited foreign-funded advertisements for Nigeria's elections in February and for Ukraine's elections later this month.

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Facebook
The logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square, March 29, 2018. VOA

Facebook says it will not allow foreign-funded advertisements for an upcoming presidential election in Indonesia, the world’s third-largest democracy, hoping to allay concerns that its platform is being used to manipulate voting behavior.

The announcement on Facebook’s website said the restriction in Indonesia took effect Monday morning and is part of “safeguarding election integrity on our platform.”

Facebook and other internet companies are facing increased scrutiny over how they handle private user data and have been lambasted for not doing enough to stop misuse of their platforms by groups trying to sway elections. Critics say foreign interests, and Russia in particular, used Facebook to harvest private data and disseminate paid ads that may have influenced the outcomes of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the U.K. referendum on leaving the European Union.

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The social media company, which also owns Instagram and WhatsApp and has about 2.3 billion users for its Facebook site alone, said it’s using a mix of automated and human intervention to identify foreign-funded election ads. Pixabay

Indonesia votes for president on April 17. The campaign pits incumbent leader Joko Widodo against ultranationalist former Gen. Prabowo Subianto, who was narrowly defeated by Widodo in 2014.

The social media company, which also owns Instagram and WhatsApp and has about 2.3 billion users for its Facebook site alone, said it’s using a mix of automated and human intervention to identify foreign-funded election ads.

Facebook
Critics say foreign interests, and Russia in particular, used Facebook to harvest private data and disseminate paid ads that may have influenced the outcomes of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the U.K. referendum on leaving the European Union. VOA

It said the restriction applies to any ads coming from an advertiser based outside of the country “if it references politicians or political parties or attempts to encourage or suppress voting.”

Also Read: New Techniques Let Scientists Directly Study The DNA Codes

The company said it had also prohibited foreign-funded advertisements for Nigeria’s elections in February and for Ukraine’s elections later this month.

For upcoming elections for the European Parliament and India, it has said advertisers will need to be authorized to buy political ads and a new tool will provide information about an ad’s budget, the number of people it reached and demographics about who saw the ad, including age, gender and location. (VOA)