Monday July 23, 2018

iPad Neck Pain More Common Among Women Than Men

Postures that led to pain included those that cause the tablet user to "slump" over and gaze downward

0
//
14
iPad Neck Pain More Common Among Women Than MeniPad Neck Pain More Common Among Women Than Men
iPad Neck Pain More Common Among Women Than Men. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Women are two times more likely than men to experience pain in their neck during iPad use due mainly to bad postures, warns a new study.

iPad Neck — a condition of persistent pain in the neck and upper shoulders caused by slouching or bending into extreme positions while using tablet computers — is also more prevalent among young people than older adults, said the study.

The findings, published in the Journal of Physical Therapy Science, suggest that posture, not screen time, is the biggest factor behind neck and shoulder pain due to iPad use.

“Theoretically, the more hours you spend bent over an iPad, the more neck and shoulder pain you experience — but what we found is that time is not the most important risk factor. Rather, it’s gender and specific postures,” said lead study author Szu-Ping Lee from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV).

Postures that led to pain included those that cause the tablet user to “slump” over and gaze downward.

The pain disparity among men and women might be explained by size and movement differences.

iPad
iPad. Pixabay

Women’s tendency to have lower muscle strength and smaller stature (for example, shorter arms and narrow shoulders) might lead them to assume extreme neck and shoulder postures while typing, according to the researchers.

In the study, the team conducted a survey of over 400 people, including public university students, staff, faculty, and alumni who were touchscreen tablet computer users.

The results showed that 70 per cent of female respondents reported experiencing symptoms of iPad neck as compared to just under 30 per cent of men.

Women were also more likely (77 per cent) to use their tablets while sitting on the floor than men (23 per cent).

Also Read: Asthma Patients May be Over-Medicating

Further, sitting without back support increased the odds of pain by two times. Sitting with the device on the lap or sitting on a chair with the tablet placed on a flat desk surface also contributed to the pain.

The researchers found that university students, staff and alumni they studied reported a higher prevalence of neck and shoulder pain than the general population.

Sitting on chairs with back support and exercising to strengthen muscles are some steps that users could take to avoid pain due to iPad use, according to the researchers. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Diabetic Women at Greater Risk of Developing Cancer Than Men, According to a New Study

Overall, it was calculated that women with diabetes were six per cent more likely to develop any form of cancer than men with diabetes

0
The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.
The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher. Pixabay

Women suffering from diabetes may be at a higher risk of developing cancer than men, a new study has found.

The findings suggested that among the study participants, women with diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2) were at higher risks for developing kidney cancer (11 per cent), oral cancer (13 per cent), stomach cancer (14 per cent) and leukaemia (15 per cent) compared to men with the similar condition.

Diabetes affects more than 415 million people worldwide, with five million deaths every year.

According to the researchers, it is believed that heightened blood glucose may have cancer-causing effects by leading to DNA damage.

“The link between diabetes and the risk of developing cancer is now firmly established,” said lead author Toshiaki Ohkuma from The George Institute for Global Health in Australia.

They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women.
They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women. Pixabay

“The number of people with diabetes has doubled globally in the last 30 years but we still have much to learn about the condition,” Ohkuma added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetologia, the researchers examined data on all-site cancer events (incident or fatal only) from 121 cohorts that included 19,239,302 individuals.

The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.

Also Read: Eating Dinner Early May Lower Risk of Breast, Prostate Cancer

They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women.

Overall, it was calculated that women with diabetes were six per cent more likely to develop any form of cancer than men with diabetes.

“It’s vital that we undertake more research into discovering what is driving this, and for both people with diabetes and the medical community to be aware of the heightened cancer risk for women and men with diabetes,” Ohkuma noted. (IANS)