Monday August 19, 2019
Home Politics Is Srinagar t...

Is Srinagar turning blind eye to militants who killed 3 policemen?

Several questions such as “Don’t they have the right to live?” “Why to attack unarmed policemen?” are being raised.

2
//
J&K Cheif minister, Image credits : Indianexpress.com
  • Unidentified gunmen shot dead 2 policemen at Bagh-e-Mardan 
  • Hizbul Mujahideen claimed responsibility for all these lethal attacks
  • Militants are getting ready for more action and are lurking in Srinagar

SRINAGAR: For the first time in 3 years once again Policemen are being targeted by the militants in Jammu and Kashmir. Unidentified militants shot dead 3 policemen from the Special Operation Group (SOG) recently in Srinagar on May 24.

In the first attack, unidentified gunmen shot dead 2 policemen at Bagh-e-Mardan (located 200m from Zadibal police station). Both officers were unarmed. After being shot they died on their way to the hospital. Whereas in the second attack attackers came on a motorcycle and shot the policemen. Before fleeing the spot they also managed to snatch Rifles and other weapons.

Hizbul Mujahideen claimed responsibility for all these lethal attacks. He has further warned of similar attacks in near future. For a long time though the J&K police have been able to maintain the city as a militant free place. Security forces were achieving very good success but these killings now indicate militants have managed to sneak into the city. However, security in Srinagar was tightened and armed policemen were deployed in crowded areas.

Javid Mujtaba Gillani (Inspector General of Police (Kashmir Zone)) said: “the attacks were the result of security forces maintaining pressure on militants.”

Paying homage to dead soldiers. Wikimedia commons
Paying homage to dead soldiers. Wikimedia commons

K Rajendra Kumar (The Director General of Police) further elucidated “Militant recruits face a shortage of weapons because the traditional arms-supply through the Line of Control has been thwarted by a strict vigil of the Indian Army, according to news reports. The militants, as a result, have taken to snatching weapons from security forces to stock their arsenals.

These attacks a desperate act by militants to announce their presence. Militants are getting ready for more action and are lurking in Srinagar.

Contrary to this fact Khurram Parvez, (human rights activist and Programme Coordinator of the Jammu and Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society in Srinagar) said “the police personnel knows the consequences and dangers involved in duty. Legally speaking this [Zadibal shootout] was combatants fighting combatants,”

J&K Chief minister Mehbooba Mufti paid homage to the departed souls of the policemen. Omar Abdullah (National Conference working president) called it a “worrying development. Locals are mourning the death of those unarmed police forces. Several questions such as “Don’t they have the right to live?” “Why to attack unarmed policemen?” are being raised. There have been sayings that “If this is Jihad, then we want nothing out of it.”

ALSO READ:

-by Pritam

Pritam is a 3rd year engineering student and an intern at NewsGram. Twitter handle: @pritam_gogreen

  • Pritam Go Green

    India and Pakistan should work collectively to stop these infiltration. The more we are trying to make peace in J&K , the more they attack.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    J&K have been a place of such inhuman activities. There are people in J&K who are anti-Indians. The main reason behind this is the brainwash they go through. Some wish to declare J&K as a separate country, not with Pakistan nor with India

Next Story

Phishing Attacks Remain Top Threat to Financial Services Organisations and Customers

The goal of phishing is to trick the recipient of a malicious email into opening and engaging with it

0
Phishing, Attacks, Threat
The study by cloud delivery network provider Akamai Technologies found that 50 per cent of all unique organisations impacted by observed phishing domains were from the financial services sector. Pixabay

Criminals seem to be recycling old attack methods as a new report has found that phishing attacks remain the top threat to financial services organisations and customers.

The study by cloud delivery network provider Akamai Technologies found that 50 per cent of all unique organisations impacted by observed phishing domains were from the financial services sector.

The goal of phishing is to trick the recipient of a malicious email into opening and engaging with it.

The “sender” of the email deceives the victim by making the email appear to be sent from a reputable source, such as a government department, a supplier, or a customer of the business.

Phishing, Attacks, Threat
Criminals seem to be recycling old attack methods as a new report has found that phishing attacks remain the top threat to financial services organisations and customers. Pixabay

The phishing email may have a malicious attachment, like a PDF or Word document, that, once opened, will harm the user’s computer by installing malware.

Or, the phishing email will contain a malicious URL link in its body. When the user clicks on that link, they might be directed to a site that appears legitimate, but in actuality it is used to collect confidential information such as usernames and passwords, or to install malware onto their device, according to Akamai.

The report indicates that between December 2, 2018 and May 4, 2019, nearly 200,000 phishing domains were discovered, and of those domains, 66 per cent targeted consumers directly.

In addition to unique phishing attempts, adversaries also leveraged credential stuffing attacks to the tune of 3.5 billion attempts during an 18-month period (November 2017 to
April 2019), putting the personal data and banking information of financial services customers at risk, said the “State of the Internet/Security Financial Services Attack Economy” report.

Also Read- Conclave of Himalayan States Urge Centre for Development of New Tourist Destinations, New Central Ministry

In credential stuffing, bad actors use real credentials stolen from a third-party resource. They take advantage of a common habit of people using the same credentials for different online accounts.

“We’ve seen a steady rise in credential stuffing attacks over the past year, fed in part by a growth in phishing attacks against consumers,” said Martin McKeay, Security Researcher at Akamai.

“Criminals supplement existing stolen credential data through phishing, and then one way they make money is by hijacking accounts or reselling the lists they create. We’re seeing a whole economy developing to target financial services organisations and their consumers,” McKeay added. (IANS)