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ITU defines 5G network speed; to be launched during 2018 winter Olympics

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

The International Telecom Union (ITU) has set out a preliminary set of definitions for the fifth generation of mobile networks. In a recent conference held in San Diego from June 10th to 18th, a 12-member delegation decided upon the specifications of this network which is expected to have a speed that would be 20 times faster than the current 4G network.

The group decided that the data speed for the 5G network would be around 20Gbps (Gigabits per second) which is almost 20 times faster than the 4G network which provides a speed of only 1Gbps. With a speed of 20 Gbps, users will be able to download HD movies within seconds and surf the internet faster than ever. A very high resolution of video content and holographic technology via networks can be easily accessed by the users. While Indians are yet to grace the 4G network more widely, the world is already gearing up for the fifth generation. The 5G network is most likely to be named as IMT 2020. However, a huge challenge for this network would be the issue of standardization and bringing together the major telecom operators around the world to settle for a similar set of regulations. The IMT 2020 systems will be designed to deal with a potentially wide range of fields like healthcare, robotics, virtual reality and industrial automation. It is going to significantly transform wire353682less communications as a part of its predicted functioning which is likely to match the speeds and reliability achieved by fiber-optic infrastructure. With instant connectivity and high speed surfing options, 5G network is about to bring in a huge revolution in the telecom sector.

The final confirmation for these specifications will be done in the month of October 2015, after an approval from the 193 member nations of ITU. This 5G network is expected to be rolled out in 2020 commercially, with a prior demonstration of the technology at the 2018 winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Sources revealed that by 2019, the international spectrum for the 5G network will be distributed across the globe.

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Facebook To Invest $300Mn In Local News Partnerships, Programs

The idea behind the investments, Brown said, is to look “holistically at how a given publisher can define a business model."

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Facebook, dating
Facebook owned photo-messaging app Instagram already supports the "Unsend" capability VOA

Facebook says it is investing $300 million over the next three years in local news programs, partnerships and other initiatives.

The money will go toward reporting grants for local newsrooms, expanding Facebook’s program to help local newsrooms with subscription business models and investing in nonprofits aimed at supporting local news.

The move comes at a difficult time for the news industry, which is facing falling profits and print readership. Facebook, like Google, has also been partly blamed for the ongoing decline in newspapers’ share of advertising dollars as people and advertisers have moved online.

Facebook, Fake News
A user gets ready to launch Facebook on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. Facebook has made changes to fight false information, including de-emphasizing proven false stories in people’s feeds so others are less likely to see them. VOA

Campbell Brown, Facebook’s head of global news partnerships, acknowledges the company “can’t uninvent the internet,” but says it wants to work with publishers to help them succeed on and off the social network.

“The industry is going through a massive transition that has been underway for a long time,” she said. “None of us have quite figured out ultimately what the future of journalism is going to look like but we want to be part of helping find a solution.”

Facebook has increased its focus on local news in the past year after starting off 2018 with the announcement that it was generally de-emphasizing news stories and videos in people’s feeds on the social network in favor of posts from their friends.

At the same time, though, the company has been cautiously testing out ways to boost local news stories users are interested in and initiatives to support the broader industry. It launched a feature called “Today In” that shows people local news and information , including missing-person alerts, road closures, crime reports and school announcements, expanding it to hundreds of cities around the U.S. and a few in Australia.

Facebook, social media
Silhouettes of laptop users are seen next to a screen projection of Facebook logo in this illustration. VOA

The push to support local news comes as Facebook, which is based in Menlo Park, California, tries to shake off its reputation as a hotbed for misinformation and elections-meddling. The company says users have been asking to see more local content that is relevant to them, including news stories as well as community information such as road closings during a snowstorm.

The $300 million investment includes a $5 million grant to the nonprofit Pulitzer Center to launch “Bringing Stories Home,” a fund that will provide local U.S. newsrooms with reporting grants to support coverage of local issues. There’s also a $2 million investment in Report for America as part of a partnership aiming to place 1,000 journalists in local newsrooms across the country over the next five years.

The idea behind the investments, Brown said, is to look “holistically at how a given publisher can define a business model. Facebook can’t be the only answer, the only solution — we don’t want the publisher to be dependent on Facebook.”

Also Read: Democratic Lawmakers Further Investigate Russia’s Involvement In U.S. Election

Fran Wills, CEO of the Local Media Consortium, which is receiving $1 million together with the Local Media Association to help their member newsrooms develop new revenue streams, said she is optimistic the investment will help.

“I think they are recognizing that trusted, credible content is of benefit not only to local publishers but to them,” she said. (VOA)