Tuesday February 18, 2020
Home India Jharkhand gir...

Jharkhand girls make it to toppers’ list defying odds

It’s been a hard road to success for Aarti who now hopes to become an Indian Administrative Service official one day

0
//
St.Aloysius School Ranchi Jharkhand affiliated to the Jharkhand Academic Council Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

By Nityanand Shukla, Ranchi: Nothing could stop Aarti Kumari of Ranchi. Defying all the odds — poverty to displacement — this girl from Jharkhand stood out in her effort to make a mark. Today she has tasted success: Aarti is at the second spot in this year’s Arts intermediate merit list published by the Jharkhand Academic Council (JAC).

Aarti had lost her father in 2015 when she was studying in the 12th standard. It was then left to her mother to shoulder the responsibilities. But a distraught Aarti could not take the JAC exam that year.

But she pulled herself together and made up her mind. This year, she took the test and the JAC result proved that she’s one of the brightest students in Jharkhand.

Her mother has been the pillar of strength for Aarti and her brother, who has also completed his engineering studies.

Besides losing her father, Aarti had to face displacement as the family was forced to vacate their tenement in Naga Baba Khatal. They took shelter in another part of Ranchi. It was a tough time, but Aarti was constantly supported by her mother who told her to never deviate from her academic pursuits.

It’s been a hard road to success for Aarti who now hopes to become an Indian Administrative Service official one day.

Similar is the story of Gayatri Singh of Gumla district. Her parents work at a brick kiln in Uttar Pradesh. Gayatri, however, didn’t follow them to the neighbouring state — she stayed back along with her sisters and brother, who works in a local store.

Gayatri had been adamant that despite financial constraints and the troubles that come with it, she would never give up studying. Her brother worked hard to ensure that Gayatri was not forced to drop out.

The result has been spectacular: Gayatri is at the third spot on the JAC merit list.

No wonder then that the neighbours are happy — the girl next door has made them proud, proving that nothing can come in the way if one is powered by a dream, determination and hard work.

Another shining example of grit and determination is Reeta Nupur Kujur of Lohardaga district who followed her dreams even as she got married and gave birth to a son. She has secured 10th position as per the JAC merit list.

Reeta got married after taking her matriculation exam. The marital life took away much of her time, as she became a mother. But her wish to pursue studies remained etched deep in her heart. Thankfully, she was encouraged by her husband, a farmer, who understood the need to study if Reeta was to fulfil her dream to become an Indian Police Service official one day.

So after a gap of six years, Reeta got back to the study materials and took admission in a women’s college. There has been no looking back since then. Reeta now plans to pursue graduate course in English and then chase her dream to become an IPS official. (Source: IANS)

(Nityanand Shukla can be contacted at nityanand.s@ians.in)

ALSO READ: 

Next Story

Higher Poverty Associated with Increased Youth Suicide Risk: Researchers

Further, areas of concentrated poverty may lack infrastructure such as quality schools, sustainable jobs, health care facilities, and mental health resources supporting good health for adults and children, they added

0
Suicide
When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person's risk of suicide. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that adolescents living in poverty may be at greater risk of suicide, particularly by firearms.

According to the study, suicide in children under age 20 has been increasing in the US, with rates almost doubling over the last decade. Between 2007 to 2016, nearly 21,000 children ages 5-19 years old died by suicide,

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, show a link between poverty and suicide in children and teens.

“The results were consistent in a step-wise fashion, as poverty increased, so did the rate of suicide,” said study researchers Lois Lee, from Boston Children’s Hospital in the US.

For the results, the researchers grouped the number of suicides into five levels of poverty at the county level ranging from a low of 0-4.9 per cent to greater than 20 per cent.

They learned that the rate of suicides in children and adolescents is 37 per cent higher in counties with the highest levels of poverty – where more than 20 per cent of the population in the county lives below the federal poverty level – compared with suicide rates in the lowest levels of poverty.

In this study, researchers collected information from the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Compressed Mortality File, which includes data on all US deaths, including cause of death.

Suicide
The Suicide rate in cities in 2016 was 13 per cent as compared to the all-India suicide rate of 10.3 per cent. Pixabay

After searching for deaths by suicide, method of suicide, and county where the suicide occurred from 2007-2016, they paired that data with county-level poverty rates from US Census data and poverty estimates from the US Census Bureau Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) Programme.

The findings from this study are similar to research from the CDC that found increases in suicide in youth and young adults ages 10-24 between 2000-2017.

The research also revealed an increased suicide rate from firearms in the more impoverished counties compared to the least.

According to the study, the researchers have seen a rise in the number of children and teens with mental health issues, including suicide attempts or thoughts of suicide, seeking care in the emergency department (ED).

Also Read: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Sued by Girlfriend Lauren’s Brother Over Defamation

The study authors reported that children living in poverty are likely to be exposed to more family turmoil, violence, social isolation, and lack of positive peer-to-peer relationships and may be more likely to have emotional difficulties like depression and anxiety.

Further, areas of concentrated poverty may lack infrastructure such as quality schools, sustainable jobs, health care facilities, and mental health resources supporting good health for adults and children, they added. (IANS)