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Journey of Hindi from Dialect “boli’ to Official-National Language ‘rashtrabhasha’

It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood, among all the other Indian languages

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August 27, 2016:

“Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.”
– Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A Language has a paramount importance just not in the terms of exchanging words, but also in terms of sharing  feelings, expressions and beliefs – in the form of words, signs, symbols or sound. It is an important source and means of human communication. But with time, gradual change and development of languages, have become more apparent.

Evolution of any language depends mainly on socialization and interaction. Most interactive languages have evolved rapidly, rather than any isolated language of any particular tribe, that resides distinctly far away, based on the geographical biases. Languages which lack in socialization and interaction, also lack in adapting values and behaviors from other culture as well.

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India is a multi-lingual country, and officially it has 22 languages and Hindi being one of them. It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood by the majority of Indians.

  • Origin of Hindi Language: According to Griysen, Hindi is divided into two- Paschimi Hindi – Shourseni Apbransh and Purvi Hindi – Ardhmagdhi Apbransh. The root of Shourseni Apbhransh is Sanskrit, which came from Aryan language. Shourseni Apbhransh has developed into Khadi Boli, and later to Hindi.

Hindi, being the most interactive and socialized language is coupled with the influence of technology, lifestyle and other languages and culture, is no less far in terms of evolving.

Image source: YouTube
Image source: YouTube

Evolution of Hindi has occurred in numerous forms:

  • Change in writing and speaking: Hindi is written in Devnagri script originated from ‘Bahamani Lipi’, though later in 1935, few corrections in changing of letter’s shapes and use of the verbs took place in “Nagri Lipi Sudhar Samiti” by Kaka Kalelkar. Moreover, nowadays people are more prone to using ‘Bol Ki Bhasha’ or spoken word, rather than, ‘Manak’ or standard Hindi.

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  • Insertion of New Words: Over time, Hindi has been influenced by foreign languages- like Urdu, English, Persian Sanskrit, Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Portuguese, Dravidian Languages and others. Hindi is full of loan words and one will be surprised to know that most of the words that we use in our daily conversation have a foreign origin. Therefore number of words like – Tadbhava (तद्भव/تَدبهَو derived from Sanskrit or Prakrit), Tatsama (तत्सम/تَتسَم identical, derived from Sanskrit), Deshaja (देशज/دیشَج local, derived from Sanskrit).
  • Influence of media: Hindi has got worldwide fame for the influence of media. Social media, film, and television have influenced the writing style of Hindi a lot! People who don’t know how to read or write Hindi to express his feelings in the form of Devnagri script can easily do the same in Roman script. Be it ‘sharyari’ or a film script; use of Roman script in Hindi in nothing new.
  • Popular songs and Advertisements: Exposure of Hindi through songs or adds helps the language to reach out to several people. Nowadays, to make songs appealing and catchy, lyricists and script writers prefer a combination of both Hindi and English and other languages. Due to this, directly or indirectly one comes across the language or gets aware of it. Thus, we can have an idea, how Hindi has evolved with the evolution of time.

– by Riashe Chakraborty from NewsGram. Twitter: @itzriashe

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  • Islamic Origin Language Hindi

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Next Story

Survey Says More Than Half of The Indians Talk to People With Opposing Views

The fieldwork was conducted from November 26-December 7, 2018

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Multiple apps are displayed on an iPhone in New York.. VOA

Amid allegations of “intolerance” of diverse opinions in the country, a new survey for the BBC’s Crossing Divides season has found that 56 per cent Indians profess to have conversations with people with opposing views on issues like politics, climate change, immigration and feminism at least once a week.

Further, 42 per cent urban Indians polled said that they felt comfortable sharing their political opinion with others even if they have a contrary view to theirs, showed the results on Tuesday, making India the fourth country with such a large proportion of population that feels at ease with political viewpoints.

The other three markets endorsing this view were Turkey (61 per cent), Mexico (45 per cent) and South Africa (43 per cent), according to the survey conducted by market research firm Ipsos.

At the bottom of the heap were Japan (seven per cent), South Korea (27 per cent) and Italy (28 per cent).

“The study shows that Indians are taking the opposing views in their stride and have figured out a mature way of dealing with them by avoiding direct confrontation,” Parijat Chakraborty, Head of Ipsos Public Affairs, Ipsos India, said in a statement.

The study, however, also showed that 43 per cent self-righteous urban Indians believe that those who oppose their views care less about India’s future.

But only two in 10 Indians (22 per cent) feel that people’s divisive views on politics are dangerous for the society.

Just as social media companies have come up with transparency rules for political ads, they should have similar features for influencers so that people can distinguish between commercial space and personal space. Pixabay

Nearly 70 per cent of urban Indians believe that social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are giving a voice to people who would not normally take part in debates and social issues.

Further, 63 per cent Indians credit social platforms like Facebook and Twitter for breaking down barriers between the public and those wielding power.

“Also, majority of Indians exhort the merits of social platforms as interactive mediums. Downside being, social platforms are denounced for being divisive though,” Chakraborty added.

Also Read- Air Pollution Kills Around 6 Lakh Children Every Year, Claims UN

While 43 per cent Indians hail the positive impact of immigration on India, 20 per cent hold the contrary view, the results showed.

The findings were part of a global study carried out online among adults under 65 across 27 countries. Nearly 20,000 adults participated in the survey.

The fieldwork was conducted from November 26-December 7, 2018. (IANS)