Wednesday January 24, 2018

Kalabhairava Karma: The dimension of consciousness beyond time

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By Gaurav Sharma

Most people have some clue about Karma, the cycle of action and reaction that defines one’s state of existence or life. Few are aware about the phenomenon of death.

For the majority, life comes to an end after death, implying therefore, that there is no experience beyond the body. The ancient wisdom of the Vedas, however, is unequivocal in defining death as a mere shift of vehicle, a simple change of the bodily dress.

According to the Upanishads, dying can be compared to falling asleep and after-death experiences to dreams.

The nature of dream is solely determined by the thoughts and actions contemplated and performed during the waking stage. Based on these lines, the atma or the soul experiences the results of the activities performed during its time on Earth or the particular plane of existence.

Just as a dream is real to the dreamer, the after-death experiences are real to the soul. Therefore, when a person dies, it essentially means that his body–the accumulated sum of the experiences gathered up to that particular point of time–has been left behind.

The subtle body, comprising of the mind (manas), the intellect (buddhi) and the ego (ahamkara) carries the self or the soul to another body according to the level of consciousness of the self.

And, when the consciousness created by the living entity is such, that there is absolutely no awareness of the difference between the body and the self, the soul tends to hang about. This is because it has merged itself in experience with the gross body.

When the person is leaving, it is possible to create the required awareness that ‘who one is’ and ‘what one has collected’ are two entirely different aspects. This is where the concept of Kalbhairava Karma comes in.

According to Yogi Jaggi Vasudev, Kalbhairava Karma relates to the bundle of memory that is floating around and seeking a new body. It is about the dimension of life that has left the body.

“Kala Bhairava is a unique manifestation of Shiva, which is in the form of time.

You cannot manage time because it is running at its own pace. Energy you can manage, you can play with it. Time is running at its own pace, but there is a certain dimension of consciousness, which can go beyond time. That dimension of consciousness is referred to as Kala Bhairava”, says the founder of the Isha foundation.

While enumerating the different ways in which the soul can leave the body, the mystic reduces death to three basic eventualities: Old age, accidents/natural causes and attainment of a higher spiritual dimension.

Old age implies the weakening of the life energy to such a feeble extent that life becomes incapable of holding on to the physical body. Accidents refer to death through crashes, body ailments and also through deliberate wrecking of the the body organs.

Lastly, death can also occur when the life energy is magnified to a level where the physical body becomes powerless in maintaining the being.

The rare third form of death can be termed as liberation, enlightenment and attainment in the spiritual jargon.

When a being passes away via any of the first two mediums, there is a possibility of ‘touching’ the life element. Touching means that the being loses its physical body and, more importantly, the discernment ability of the mind.

Due to such inexorable factors, when the ‘passed-away’ being is touched with pleasantness or unpleasantness, it experiences the feeling in a much more intense form.

To make the concept more vivid, Sadhguru elucidates the fable of Markandeya from the annals of Hindu ‘mythology’. Although the parable has been vocalised in myriad ways, the basic plot revolves around the death of Markandeya, a devotee of Shiva.

When Yama, the God of death approaches Markandeya, a 15 year-old child, the young child holds on to a form of Shiva; a linga consecrated in the form of Kala Bhairava. Suddenly, a dimension of consciousness explodes within the child after which the child is no longer within the realm of time.

The child then continues to live his life as a fifteen year old, never, for once, turning sixteen; the age when he was predicted to die.

The epic of Markandeya defines Kala Bhairava Karma in no uncertain terms, as the journey of the soul beyond the clutches of body, death and time.

 

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8 Amazing Facts About Lord Hanuman That Will Astonish You

The glorious tales of Lord Hanuman is mentioned in several texts, such as the Mahabharata, the Puranas, the Buddhist and Sikh texts

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Hanuman is the son of Anjana and Kesari. Wikimedia Commons
Hanuman is the son of Anjana and Kesari. Wikimedia Commons
  • Once Lord Hanuman assumed a very rare form of Panch-Mukhi Hanuman to kill the demon Ahiravan
  • Hanuman was kind of a naughty kid in his childhood and he often used to tease the meditating sages in the forests
  • Agni blessed Lord Hanuman, Saying, “Fire will never burn you

Lord Hanuman was a passionate devotee of Lord Rama and one of the crucial characters in the various versions of the epic Ramayana found in the Indian subcontinent. The glorious tales of Lord Hanuman is also mentioned in several other texts, such as the Mahabharata, the Puranas, the Buddhist and Sikh texts.

As per several other texts, Lord Hanuman is also presented as an incarnation of Shiva. Hanuman is the son of Anjana and Kesari. He is also taken as the son of the wind-god Vayu, who according to several stories played a role in his birth.

Hanuman Jayanti

The Hanuman Jayanti is also known as Hanuman Janam-Utsav. Hanuman Jayanti is a Hindu religious festival that celebrates the birth of Lord Sri Hanuman, who is immensely venerated throughout India and Nepal.

During the Pandavas' exile, Hanuman masked as a weak and aged monkey to Bhima in order to subdue his arrogance. Wikimedia Commons
During the Pandavas’ exile, Hanuman masked as a weak and aged monkey to Bhima in order to subdue his arrogance. Wikimedia Commons

Hanuman Jayanti is celebrated on different days in different parts of India. In many states, the festival is observed either in the day of Chaitra Pournimaa or in the month of Vaishakha. In a few states like Kerala and Tamil Nadu, Hanuman Jayanti is celebrated in the Hindu month of Margazhi.

Hanuman Chalisa

The Hanuman Chalisa literally means forty Chaupais (chapter) on Lord Hanuman. It is a Hindu devotional hymn addressed to Lord Hanuman.

Traditionally, it was believed that Hanuman Chalisa was authored by 16th-century poet Tulsidas in the Awadhi language and is his best-known text apart from the Ramcharitmanas.

The word “Chalisa” is derived from “Chalis”, which means the number forty in Hindi. So does the Hanuman Chalisa has 40 verses.

Here, we have compiled some interesting facts about Lord Hanuman which will surely amaze you.

  1. Lord Hanuman’s battle with Lord Rama

The sage Vishwamithra ordered Lord Rama to kill Yayati. Sensing the gravity of the situation, Yayathi pleaded Lord Hanuman for help. The Yayati was promised By Hanuman that he would save Yayati from any kind of danger.

In the battlefield, Lord Hanuman did not use any weapon. Hanuman stood chanting Rama’s name and the arrows from Lord Rama’s bow did not have any effect on him

Finally, Lord Rama had to give up and sage Vishwamithra relieved Rama of his word seeing the courage of Hanuman.

Once Lord Hanuman assumed a very rare form of Panch-Mukhi Hanuman to kill the demon Ahiravan. Wikimedia Commons
Once Lord Hanuman assumed a very rare form of Panch-Mukhi Hanuman to kill the demon Ahiravan. Wikimedia Commons

2. Hanuman’s hunger saga

Once Lord Hanuman visited Sita Mata in sage Valmiki’s cottage and expressed his desire to eat some food cooked by Sita. Sita Mata started cooking many dishes and started serving Hanuman.

But Hanuman’s hunger was unquenchable and the entire rations of the house were coming to an end and finally, Sita Mata had to pray Lord Rama. Then Lord Hanuman suggested Sita Mata serve a morsel with a Tulsi Leaf and then his hunger was finally satisfied.

Also Read: Saphala Ekadashi: Significance, Celebrations, Rituals, Festival Timings and Dates

3. Five headed Hanuman

Once Lord Hanuman assumed a very rare form of Panch-Mukhi Hanuman to kill the demon Ahiravan. Ahiravan was the younger brother of Ravan, who kidnapped Ram and Lakshman and took them to the Netherworld. The only way to kill Ahiravan was to extinguish 5 lamps in 5 different directions, which Lord Hanuman did with Panch-Mukhi form.

The other five faces of Hanuman, apart from himself are that of Narasimha, Garuda, Varaha and Hayagriva.

4. Demise of Rama

Lord Ram would have lived more only if Lord Hanuman wouldn’t have allowed Yama to enter Ayodhya to claim Ram.

Lord Ram diverted Hanuman’s attention by dropping his ring through a crack in the floor and asked Hanuman to fetch it back for him. Lord Hanuman immediately reached the land of serpents and asked their King for Ram’s ring and the king showed Hanuman a vault filled with rings all of which were Ram’s.

Hanuman challenged Arjuna to build a bridge like the one Lord Rama made. Wikimedia Commons
Hanuman challenged Arjuna to build a bridge like the one Lord Rama made. Wikimedia Commons

5. The curse on Hanuman

Hanuman was kind of a naughty kid in his childhood and he often used to tease the meditating sages in the forests. Finding Lord Hanuman’s unbearable acts, but realizing that he was but a child, the sages placed a mild curse on him by which he became unable to remember his own ability unless reminded by another person.

The curse of the sages is featured in Kishkindha Kanda and Sundara Kanda when Jambavantha reminds Hanuman of his abilities and encourages him to go and find Sita.

6. God’s blessing to Hanuman

After the birth of Lord Hanuman, Varuna blessed Lord Hanuman with a boon that he would always be protected from water and Agni blessed him, Saying, “Fire will never burn you.” Surya blessed him with two siddhis of yoga namely “Laghima” and “Garima”(“Laghima” could help him to attain the smallest form and with “Garima” the biggest form of life).

Vayu showered Lord Hanuman with more speed than he himself had and Yama (the God of Death) blessed him with a healthy life.

Also Read: Diwali 2017: Significance of the Diwali, Celebrations & Rituals, Date & Diwali Recipes

7. Lord Hanuman and Bhima confrontation

Hanuman is also appraised to be the brother of Bhima as they had the same father, Vayu. During the Pandavas’ exile, Hanuman masked as a weak and aged monkey to Bhima in order to subdue his arrogance.

Hanuman put his tail by blocking Bhima’s way. Bhima, unaware of his identity, tells him to move it out of the way but was refused by Lord Hanuman. Bhima wasn’t able to move the tail by himself, despite his great strength.

Lord Ram would have lived more only if Lord Hanuman wouldn't have allowed Yama to enter Ayodhya to claim Ram. Wikimedia Commons
Lord Ram would have lived more only if Lord Hanuman wouldn’t have allowed Yama to enter Ayodhya to claim Ram. Wikimedia Commons

8. Mahabharata’s relevance

During the illustrious battle of Kurukshetra, Arjuna made his way into the battlefield with a flag displaying Hanuman on his chariot.

Earlier, after one of the encounters between Hanuman and Arjuna, Hanuman appeared as a small talking monkey before Arjuna at Rameshwaram, where Rama had built a bridge to cross over to Lanka.

Hanuman challenged Arjuna to build such a bridge alone when Lord Hanuman found out that Arjuna’s was wondering aloud at Rama’s taking the help of monkeys rather than building a bridge of arrows.