Wednesday March 21, 2018

Kalabhairava Karma: The dimension of consciousness beyond time



By Gaurav Sharma

Most people have some clue about Karma, the cycle of action and reaction that defines one’s state of existence or life. Few are aware about the phenomenon of death.

For the majority, life comes to an end after death, implying therefore, that there is no experience beyond the body. The ancient wisdom of the Vedas, however, is unequivocal in defining death as a mere shift of vehicle, a simple change of the bodily dress.

According to the Upanishads, dying can be compared to falling asleep and after-death experiences to dreams.

The nature of dream is solely determined by the thoughts and actions contemplated and performed during the waking stage. Based on these lines, the atma or the soul experiences the results of the activities performed during its time on Earth or the particular plane of existence.

Just as a dream is real to the dreamer, the after-death experiences are real to the soul. Therefore, when a person dies, it essentially means that his body–the accumulated sum of the experiences gathered up to that particular point of time–has been left behind.

The subtle body, comprising of the mind (manas), the intellect (buddhi) and the ego (ahamkara) carries the self or the soul to another body according to the level of consciousness of the self.

And, when the consciousness created by the living entity is such, that there is absolutely no awareness of the difference between the body and the self, the soul tends to hang about. This is because it has merged itself in experience with the gross body.

When the person is leaving, it is possible to create the required awareness that ‘who one is’ and ‘what one has collected’ are two entirely different aspects. This is where the concept of Kalbhairava Karma comes in.

According to Yogi Jaggi Vasudev, Kalbhairava Karma relates to the bundle of memory that is floating around and seeking a new body. It is about the dimension of life that has left the body.

“Kala Bhairava is a unique manifestation of Shiva, which is in the form of time.

You cannot manage time because it is running at its own pace. Energy you can manage, you can play with it. Time is running at its own pace, but there is a certain dimension of consciousness, which can go beyond time. That dimension of consciousness is referred to as Kala Bhairava”, says the founder of the Isha foundation.

While enumerating the different ways in which the soul can leave the body, the mystic reduces death to three basic eventualities: Old age, accidents/natural causes and attainment of a higher spiritual dimension.

Old age implies the weakening of the life energy to such a feeble extent that life becomes incapable of holding on to the physical body. Accidents refer to death through crashes, body ailments and also through deliberate wrecking of the the body organs.

Lastly, death can also occur when the life energy is magnified to a level where the physical body becomes powerless in maintaining the being.

The rare third form of death can be termed as liberation, enlightenment and attainment in the spiritual jargon.

When a being passes away via any of the first two mediums, there is a possibility of ‘touching’ the life element. Touching means that the being loses its physical body and, more importantly, the discernment ability of the mind.

Due to such inexorable factors, when the ‘passed-away’ being is touched with pleasantness or unpleasantness, it experiences the feeling in a much more intense form.

To make the concept more vivid, Sadhguru elucidates the fable of Markandeya from the annals of Hindu ‘mythology’. Although the parable has been vocalised in myriad ways, the basic plot revolves around the death of Markandeya, a devotee of Shiva.

When Yama, the God of death approaches Markandeya, a 15 year-old child, the young child holds on to a form of Shiva; a linga consecrated in the form of Kala Bhairava. Suddenly, a dimension of consciousness explodes within the child after which the child is no longer within the realm of time.

The child then continues to live his life as a fifteen year old, never, for once, turning sixteen; the age when he was predicted to die.

The epic of Markandeya defines Kala Bhairava Karma in no uncertain terms, as the journey of the soul beyond the clutches of body, death and time.


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Life Lessons We All Should Learn From Lord Shiva

There are lot's if life lessons that one can learn from this Hindu deity

There are many life lessons that one can learn from the philosophies of Lord Shiva. Wikimedia Commons
There are many life lessons that one can learn from the philosophies of Lord Shiva. Wikimedia Commons

By Ruchika Verma

  • Lord Shiva is the supreme Hindu Deity
  • He is a symbol of peace and tranquillity
  • There are lot’s if life lessons that one can learn from this Hindu deity

Lord Shiva as everyone knows is a Hindu God. He is one of the Trinity and is the principal deity of Hinduism.  God Shiva is considered the “destroyer of evil and the transformer” of the world. The Birth and history of Lord Shiva are topics of great discussions and confusions.

Lord Shiva is one of the principle deity of hinduism. Wikimedia Commons
Lord Shiva is one of the principle deity of Hinduism. Wikimedia Commons

Lord Shiva is known to have no end and no beginning, yet, the origin of his birth is a much sought-after topic for several generations. Many ‘Puranas’ claims Shiva to be ‘aja’ meaning the one who has no birth. Some other scriptures claim that Lord Shiva was born out of Lod Narayana or Lord Vishnu. However, the authenticity of all the claims remain unclear, and there is still a solid mystery which surrounds the origin and birth of Shiva.

Shiva is also known Mahadev, i.e., the gods of all gods and rightly so. Throughout the Hindu mythology, Shiva has been portrayed as a tranquil and peaceful figure who grants all prayers of his followers and devotees. His another name is ‘Bhole Bhandari’ because of his innocent nature.

Lord Shiva is known for his peace and tranquillity. Pixabay
Lord Shiva is known for his peace and tranquillity. Pixabay

However, other than his peaceful nature, the other thing Lord Shiva is famous for is his flaring temper. Indian mythology is full of stories about Lord Shiva causing mass destruction due to his anger. The opening of his third eye is said to cause mass destruction.

Also Read: Enigmatic Mount Kailash: The abode of Lord Shiva

Lord Shiva’s appearance is a beautiful shade of blue because of him consuming the poison from the sea to save the world. However, just like his body is shades of blue there are many shades to his personality as well. Here are few life lessons of Lord Shiva that we all need to take a note of.

  • Come what may never tolerate the evil. Being destroyer of the evil himself, Shiva teaches us to never tolerate or bow down in front of the evil.
  • Self-control is the key to living a fulfilled life. Excess is of everything is bad and losing control ourselves is worse. One should always have a control over themselves to live a successful and fulfilled life.
  • Materialistic happiness is temporary. To be happy, be adjustable like water. Shiva says that attaching our happiness to earthy, material things won’t give us long-lasting happiness.
  • Keeping calm is very important. Lord Shiva used to meditate for hours and is easily the epitome of calmness and that’s what he advocates too.
  • Desires lead to destruction. Shiva believes that desires lead to obsessions which in turn leads to destruction. Never desire more than what you deserve. Be happy with what you have and work hard for what you want to achieve.
  • Respect your family. Lord Shiva is husband to Goddess Parvati and father to Lord Ganesha and Lord Kartikeya. He respected his children and especially wife a lot. Respecting one’s  family is very important for living a successful life.
  • Control your ego and let go of pride. Ego prevents us from achieving greatness. Let go of your pride and control your ego to live a fulfilled life.
  • Everything is temporary. Everything in this world is temporary. Time changes as do we and our choices and desires. It is better to let go of all the ‘moh maya’ and live in the moment happily with what we already have.