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Kerala Education Department to bring Transformation: Over 9,000 Kerala Schools Get IT Boost

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THIRUVANANTHAPURAM, May 27, 2017:  The Kerala education department on Friday announced the holistic intervention of ICT (information and communication technologies) that will assist education in 9,279 schools. Students of Class 1 to 7, through IT@School Project, would be benefited in the new academic year starting in June.

Kerala, being a role-model in ICT-enabled education, started IT education under IT@School Project for High School classes (Class 8 to 10) in early 2005 and with Friday’s launch, ICT-enabled education would be available from Class 1 to 12.

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“The scaling up of ICT enabled education in classrooms is a major step in achieving the educational goal of the government with respect to its General Education Rejuvenation Mission. Computer labs and Smart Classrooms would be set-up in all schools,” said Kerala Education Minister C. Raveendranath while launching this new initiative.

“IT@School has already imparted specific ICT training for 70,602 teachers in the state and we have roped in BSNL for providing broadband connectivity to all schools in the State and as on date 97 percent of the schools have been fully covered,” said K. Anvar Sadath, Executive Director of IT@school project. (IANS)

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Depression in Children Stay Undetected by Parents and Teachers- Study

The gold standard for identifying children who might be at risk for developing depression later in life is to ask the children themselves

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Studies: More Green Space, Less Crime, Depression in Poor Areas Pixabay

Parents and teachers may find it difficult to detect depression in young children, that can affect their social skills and academics, a new study shows.

According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America, as many as 2-3 per cent of children aged between 6-12 might have a major depressive disorder.

But parents and teachers face difficulties in recognising depression in children.

The findings, appearing in the Journal of School Psychology, showed that children who show mild to severe symptoms of depression in second and third grades are six times more likely to have skill deficits, such as difficulties with social skills or academics, than children without symptoms.

However, when teachers and parents were asked to rate a child’s level of depression, there was only about 5-10 per cent overlap in their ratings.

Depression
Parents and teachers face difficulties in recognising depression in children. Pixabay

“Some people would view that overlap as the truth about a child’s well-being and areas of disagreement as errors, but we need to explore the possibility that each of them are seeing different aspects of children’s behaviour and mental health,” said Keith Herman, professor in the University of Missouri (MU), College of Education.

For the study, the team completed profile analyses of 643 children in early elementary school to explore how patterns between student, teacher and parent reporting can be used to gain a holistic picture of a child’s mental health.

Herman suggested that mental health professionals could work with teachers and parents to identify depressive symptoms early by including self reports from children in mental health evaluations.

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“The gold standard for identifying children who might be at risk for developing depression later in life is to ask the children themselves,” noted Herman.

“However, even if a child doesn’t say they feel depressed, certain outward behaviours might provide clues to the state of the child’s mental health. It’s important for teachers and parents to catch these behaviours early to prevent long-term problems that occur with depression,” he said. (IANS)