Thursday August 22, 2019

Kidney Disease Risk Linked To Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: Study

Findings, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, showed that among the participants, 185 (6 per cent) developed CKD.

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Swapping out water for one sugary drink per day can improve health according to a new study. (VA Tech) VOA

A pattern of higher collective consumption of sweetened fruit drinks, soda and water was associated with a higher likelihood of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD), researchers warned.

It was surprising for the researchers to see water as a component of this beverage pattern that was linked to a higher risk of CKD.

They noted that study participants may have reported their consumption of a wide variety of types of water, including flavoured and sweetened water.

CKD
They noted that study participants may have reported their consumption of a wide variety of types of flavoured and sweetened water. Pixabay

“There is a lack of comprehensive information on the health implications of the wide range of beverage options that are available in the food supply,” said Casey Rebholz, Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the US.

“In particular, there is limited information on which types of beverages and patterns of beverages are associated with kidney disease risk in particular.”

For the study, the researchers studied 3,003 men and women with normal kidney function.

Kidney disease may increase the risk of diabetes.
Kidney disease may increase the risk of diabetes. IANS

Findings, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, showed that among the participants, 185 (6 per cent) developed CKD.

Also Read: Natural Sugar Supplement “Mannose” Could Help in Fighting Cancer

In addition, participants in the top tertile (any of the two points that divide an ordered distribution into three parts) for consumption of this beverage pattern were 61 per cent more likely to develop CKD than those in the bottom tertile. (IANS)

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New Study Reveals, Sugar-Sweetened Foods Can Worsen Your Mood

They suggested that rise in obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in recent years highlights the need for evidence-based dietary strategies to promote healthy lifestyle.

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"Our findings very clearly indicate that such claims are not substantiated -- if anything, sugar will probably make you feel worse," Mantantzis added. Pixabay

Contrary to popular beliefs that eating sugar-sweetened foods lift up low spirits, a new study suggests that sugar can worsen your mood.

Researchers discovered that sugar increases tiredness and lowers alertness within an hour after its consumption.

The idea of a “sugar rush” — sudden gush of energy after the consumption of sugar — is a myth, said the study published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews journal.

“The idea that sugar can improve mood has been widely influential in popular culture, so much so that people all over the world consume sugary drinks to become more alert or combat fatigue,” said lead author Konstantinos Mantantzis from the Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany.

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The idea of a “sugar rush” — sudden gush of energy after the consumption of sugar — is a myth, said the study published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews journal. Pixabay

“Our findings very clearly indicate that such claims are not substantiated — if anything, sugar will probably make you feel worse,” Mantantzis added.

For the study, the researchers collected data from 31 studies, involving nearly 1,300 adults and analysed the effect of sugar on various aspects of mood including anger, alertness, depression and fatigue.

sugar

The idea of a “sugar rush” — sudden gush of energy after the consumption of sugar — is a myth, said the study published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews journal.
Pixabay

Researchers are hopeful that their findings will go a long way to dispel the myth of the “sugar rush” and inform public health policies to decrease sugar consumption.

Also Read: Speeding Brings Costly Consequences

They suggested that rise in obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in recent years highlights the need for evidence-based dietary strategies to promote healthy lifestyle.

“Our findings indicate that sugary drinks or snacks do not provide a quick ‘fuel refill’ to make us feel more alert,” said Sandra Sunram-Lea from Lancaster University.
(IANS)