Monday February 24, 2020

Kidney Problems and even Dementia, for People who have Protein in their Urine: Study

Chronic kidney disease and dementia share many risk factors, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol

0
//
Human Urine sample. Wikimedia

London, December 15, 2016: People who have protein in their urine — a marker of kidney problems — could also be at higher risk of developing problems with thinking and memory skills or even dementia, a study has found.

“Kidney dysfunction has been considered a possible risk factor for cognitive impairment or dementia,” said Kay Deckers from Maastricht University in the Netherlands.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The analysis showed that people with protein — also known as called albuminuria or proteinuria — in the urine were 35 per cent more likely to develop cognitive impairment or dementia than people who did not have protein in their urine.

“Protein in the urine was associated with a modestly increased risk of cognitive impairment or dementia,” Deckers said.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“Chronic kidney disease and dementia share many risk factors, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol, and both show similar effects on the brain, so they may have shared vascular factors or there may even be a direct effect on the brain from kidney problems,” he added.

In addition to analysis on albuminuria or proteinuria, the team also observed other markers of kidney function, known as glomerular filtration rate — best test to measure your level of kidney function and determine stage of kidney disease.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

The results were found to be mixed and did not show an association with cognitive impairment or dementia.

For the study, published online in the journal Neurology, the team conducted a meta-analysis of 22 studies on the topic, including 27,805 people. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s Why Chronic Kidney Disease Can Turn Out To Be Deadly

Chronic kidney disease was the 12th leading cause of death globally in 2017

0
Kidney
According to the findings, published in the journal The Lancet, there were 697.5 million cases of chronic kidney disease in 2017 and nearly one-third of those patients lived in two countries - China, with about 132 million cases, and India, with about 115 million. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that chronic kidney disease caused 1.23 million deaths worldwide in 2017 and the rates of people needing dialysis have increased more than 40 per cent since 1990.

According to the findings, published in the journal The Lancet, there were 697.5 million cases of chronic kidney disease in 2017 and nearly one-third of those patients lived in two countries – China, with about 132 million cases, and India, with about 115 million.

“Chronic kidney disease is a global killer hidden in plain sight. The evidence is clear: Many nations’ health systems cannot keep pace with the dialysis demand. Cases far exceed and are well beyond the ability of those systems to handle. The consequences, literally, are deadly,” said study researcher Theo Vos from University of Washington in the US.

In addition to deaths resulting from organ failure in chronic kidney disease, impaired kidney function also puts individuals at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease, the researchers said. Globally, chronic kidney disease directly resulted in an estimated 1.23 million deaths in 2017, with an additional 1.36 million deaths attributable to cardiovascular disease resulting from impaired kidney function.

Chronic kidney disease was the 12th leading cause of death globally in 2017, up from 17th in 1990. According to the study, 10 other nations – the US, Indonesia, Russia, Japan, Brazil, Pakistan, Mexico, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and Vietnam – each had more than 10 million cases in 2017.

In total, 79 of the 195 countries included in the study exceeded 1 million cases. Those cases and deaths in 2017 led to an estimated 7.3 million years lived with disability and 28.5 million years of life lost, the study said.

There was a more than 15-fold difference in the burden of chronic kidney disease among countries: American Samoa, El Salvador, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, and Mauritius had the highest estimated rates of years lost to ill health (disability-adjusted life years or DALYs) with more than 1,500 per 100,000 population.

Kidney, Anatomy, Donor, Human, Medicine, Organ, Surgery
Researchers have revealed that chronic kidney disease caused 1.23 million deaths worldwide in 2017 and the rates of people needing dialysis have increased more than 40 per cent since 1990. Pixabay

In contrast, Andorra, Finland, Iceland, and Slovenia had the lowest burden with fewer than 120 DALYs per 100,000 population. The primary cause of chronic kidney disease varies, with hypertension and diabetes being the most common.

The link between kidney disease and other major non-communicable diseases highlights the importance of preventive care and public health policy in limiting the progression of chronic kidney disease.

ALSO READ: Tech Giant Apple Plans To Unveil 5G iPad in Second Half of 2020

HIV and exposure to toxins or heavy metals play an additional role in developing countries, while in some areas of the world the cause remains unknown, the researchers said. (IANS)