Tuesday April 23, 2019

Kidney Problems and even Dementia, for People who have Protein in their Urine: Study

Chronic kidney disease and dementia share many risk factors, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol

0
//
Human Urine sample. Wikimedia

London, December 15, 2016: People who have protein in their urine — a marker of kidney problems — could also be at higher risk of developing problems with thinking and memory skills or even dementia, a study has found.

“Kidney dysfunction has been considered a possible risk factor for cognitive impairment or dementia,” said Kay Deckers from Maastricht University in the Netherlands.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The analysis showed that people with protein — also known as called albuminuria or proteinuria — in the urine were 35 per cent more likely to develop cognitive impairment or dementia than people who did not have protein in their urine.

“Protein in the urine was associated with a modestly increased risk of cognitive impairment or dementia,” Deckers said.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“Chronic kidney disease and dementia share many risk factors, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol, and both show similar effects on the brain, so they may have shared vascular factors or there may even be a direct effect on the brain from kidney problems,” he added.

In addition to analysis on albuminuria or proteinuria, the team also observed other markers of kidney function, known as glomerular filtration rate — best test to measure your level of kidney function and determine stage of kidney disease.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

The results were found to be mixed and did not show an association with cognitive impairment or dementia.

For the study, published online in the journal Neurology, the team conducted a meta-analysis of 22 studies on the topic, including 27,805 people. (IANS)

Next Story

Late Onset of Menstruation May Spike up Dementia Risk, Says Study

For the study, the researchers involved 6,137 women among which 42 per cent later developed dementia

0
However, the researchers are yet not aware of
Representational Image- dementia, Pixabay

Women whose menstruation starts later and those who enter menopause early may have a greater risk of developing dementia, say researchers.

The findings showed that women who had their first menstrual cycle at age 16 or older had a 23 per cent greater risk of dementia than women who had their first menstrual cycle at age 13.

Women who went through natural menopause before age 47 had a 19 per cent greater risk of dementia than women who went through menopause at age 47 or older.

In addition, women who had hysterectomy — surgery to remove all or part of the uterus — had an eight per cent greater risk of dementia than those who did not, according to the study, published in the journal Neurology.

1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay
1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay

“Oestrogen levels can go up and down throughout a woman’s lifetime. Our results show that less exposure to oestrogen over the course of a lifetime is linked to an increased risk of dementia,” said Paola Gilsanz, Researcher at Kaiser Permanente – a US-based healthcare company.

For the study, the researchers involved 6,137 women among which 42 per cent later developed dementia.

Also Read- Food Insecurity In New York, Indian-Americans Work To Raise Awareness

“Since women are 50 per cent more likely to develop dementia over their lifetimes than men, it’s important to study any risk factors that are specific to women that could eventually lead us to potential points of intervention,” Gilsanz suggested. (IANS)